MECA’s Academic and Student Handbook includes information about academic and student life policies and resources, as well as conduct expectations. The handbook includes the Student Code of Responsibility, Academic policies, graduation requirements and other important student life policies and information.

As a member of the MECA Community you are responsible for the information contained in this handbook. Please take some time to familiarize yourself with this information. This handbook is available as a PDF on the MECA website (updated annually). Individual policies and resource information can also be accessed through the online links below (most up-to-date information).

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Sincerely,
Adrea Jaehnig
Director of Student Life
ajaehnig@meca.edu
207.699.5035

Maine College of Art believes in environmental responsibility. In the spirit of this belief, we ask that you consider the environmental impact of printing this full color handbook. Thank you.

Student Handbook

Last updated January 01, 2016.

Welcome

Welcome to Maine College of Art and the Portland community!

As a MECA student, you are a member of a nationally recognized creative community of highly committed students, outstanding faculty and dedicated staff.

MECA is unique for the excellent quality of its education and the high level of personal support. This student-centered campus is at the heart of a vibrant contemporary arts community. In coming to Portland, you are joining one of the most livable metropolitan communities in the country, an appealing haven for artists that combines cultural amenities and accessibility with inspiring coastlines and mountains.

This Student Handbook is a tool to help you chart your course at MECA. You’ll find clear explanations of campus policies as well as helpful information about how to connect with the extraordinary resources at MECA and in the Portland community. Keep it close at hand; you will want to consult it throughout your MECA career.

Your education will be anchored in MECA’s classrooms, studios, library and galleries, but it will also be deeply connected to the region’s professional art and design circles as well as to Portland’s diverse neighborhoods, community organizations and extraordinary natural environment. You will, of course, learn from MECA’s faculty, all of them practicing artists and scholars, and from our staff. You’ll also learn from your fellow students and from members of the Portland community — its artists, designers, neighborhood leaders, young people and seniors. Equally important, you’ll learn from yourself. The MECA experience is designed to help you push your own boundaries, both in and out of the classroom.

Our knowledgeable and experienced staff is here to help you take advantage of all that MECA has to offer, from tutorial and counseling services to internships, co-curricular programs and community engagement opportunities. Whether you need support with academic or personal matters, you can rely on us for information, advice and referrals. I encourage you to partner with staff for assistance in shaping the quality of your academic experience at MECA.

College provides a liberating opportunity to express and to share your energy, opinions, vision, and talents, and to help create the kind of artistic and educational community where you and your future colleagues can thrive. It is a special time to explore, experiment, test your limits, fail and succeed, and push the boundaries of your ambitions.

Thank you for honoring us with your faith in our ability to serve you in your personal and professional development. We are excited that you have chosen MECA, and we are willing to do everything we can to help you reach your aspirations.

Sincerely,

Don Tuski
President

Mission Statement

Our Mission:
Maine College of Art educates Artists for Life.

Our Vision:
MECA will be distinguished by its focus on educating artists and designers who excel in their chosen field with integrity, professionalism and community leadership.

Our Core Values:
At MECA, we believe in the transformational power of an arts education to serve as the foundation for a lifelong pursuit of personal and professional goals. We combine a rigorous interdisciplinary curriculum, immersive studio practice and a wealth of professional development opportunities to provide an educational experience that embodies artistic excellence, civic engagement and creative entrepreneurship.

Artistic Excellence: In the belief that learning is centered in the process of inquiry, self-discovery and creative expression, we offer our students the environment and tools they need to take risks, think critically and work creatively within and across disciplines.

Civic Engagement: With a history of a commitment to the creative evolution of our communities, we focus on engaging students in the process of becoming the inventive, self-disciplined, contributing citizens upon whom our world depends.

Creative Entrepreneurship: We teach each student the necessary professional skills to transform aspirations and values into a creative practice that will serve as the foundation for a rewarding career.

Bachelor of Fine Arts

The BFA (Bachelor of Fine Arts) is an undergraduate college degree offered in all areas of the fine and applied arts. Since World War II it has been recognized as the standard degree for students seeking a professional education in art and design. The National Association of Schools of Art & Design (NASAD) is the nationally recognized accrediting agency for programs in art and design. In NASAD’s own words, “the professional degree focuses on intensive work in the visual arts supported by a program of general studies.”

Bachelor of Fine Arts

BFA Majors at MECA

MECA offers eleven majors:

  • Ceramics
  • Digital Media
  • Graphic Design
  • Illustration
  • Metalsmithing & Jewelry
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
  • Textile & Fashion Design
  • Woodworking & Furniture Design

Students declare a major in the spring of their sophomore year. They must meet with the program chair of their chosen major and obtain the chair’s signature to start the approval process.* See “Standards to Enter a Studio Major and Maintain While Majoring” for details.

BFA Minors at MECA

Students must meet with the minor coordinator of the discipline for application materials and to design a pathway for completion of minor requirements. MECA offers four minors:

  • Art History
  • Drawing
  • Public Engagement
  • Writing

Credit Requirements for a BFA Degree at MECA

  • 120 credits required if matriculated after Fall 2009
  • 121 credits required if matriculated between Fall 2003 and Spring 2007
  • 129 credits required if matriculated between Fall 2002 and Spring 2003
  • 132 credits required if matriculated between Fall 1999 and Spring 2002
  • 134 credits required if matriculated prior to Fall 1999

Full-time students take between 12-18 credits per term. The typical load is 15 credits. Taking fewer than 12 credits per semester changes a student’s status to part-time. Students who wish to take over 18 credits will be charged for the additional credits.

General BFA Credit Distribution

120 Credits over 4 Years:

  • 75 Studio Credits
  • 30 Liberal Arts Credits (WH, WP, NS, SS, ENG)
  • 15 Art History Credits
  • 64% studio courses
  • 36% humanities courses

Art History Requirements

Students must take 15 credits of Art History courses, as follows:

  • AH 101 and AH 102 Art History Survey I & II, 6 credits
  • AH 250 Critical Approaches to Contemporary Art, 3 credits
  • (2) Art History electives, 6 credits
  • (Prior to F12 all students must have 3 credits of Non-Western Art History)

Liberal Arts Requirements

Students must take 30 credits of liberal arts courses, as follows:

  • EN 100 English Composition, 3 credits
  • EN 105 Introduction to Literature, 3 credits
  • Humanities or Social Science (HU/SS), 6 credits
  • Natural Science (NS), 6 credits
  • World History (WH), 3 credits
  • Western Philosophy (WP), 3 credits
  • (2) Liberal Arts electives (NS, SS, HU, WP or WH) 6 credits
    • One Art History elective can be used towards this requirement

Minor Requirements

Art History Minor
The Art History minor is designed for students who wish to augment their studio major with a series of courses that analyze the history, theory and criticism of diverse visual traditions in visual culture. A total of 21 credits, equal to seven (7) courses are required to complete the undergraduate minor in Art History. Prerequisites for declaring an Art History minor include completion of AH 101 and AH 102 Art History Survey with a minimum 3.0 GPA in both classes, and permission of the Art History Minor Coordinator.

The Art History Minor pathway consists of:

  • AH 101 and AH 102 Art History Survey I and II, 6 credits
  • AH 250 Critical Approaches in Contemporary Art, 3 credits
  • AH 3xx Art History Electives, 9 credits
  • AH 440 Art History Thesis, 3 credits

Drawing Minor
The Drawing Minor at MECA is sequenced to provide progressive challenges within a flexible structure, allowing students to make an educated choice about the path of their studies within this diverse discipline. A total of 18 credits is required to complete the minor. Prerequisites include successful completion of DR 100 Introduction to Drawing and permission of the Foundation Coordinator.

The Drawing Minor pathway consists of:

  • DR 100 Introduction to Drawing, 3 credits
  • DR 120 Representation Drawing, DR 130 Non-Objective Drawing or DR 140 Thinking with Drawing, 3 credits
  • DR 2xx/ 3xx Drawing Electives, 9 credits
  • DR 400 Advanced Drawing OR Independent Study, 3 credits

Public Engagement Minor
The Public Engagement (PE) minor puts students in real-world situations that tap into their creative potential. Public Engagement students work with community partners to address real, complex problems in project- and problem- based courses. Eligibility for application includes successful completion of a minimum of 30 credits with a 2.5 GPA minimum. Permission of the Public Engagement Director required.

The Public Engagement Minor pathway consists of:

  • FYL 100 First-Year Seminar 3 credits
  • PE xxx Studio Elective 3 credits
  • PE xxx Liberal Arts Elective 3 credits
  • SEM 330 Art for Social Change 3 credits
  • PE xxx Internship w/Community Partner 3 credits
  • PE 400 Public Engagement Capstone 3 credits

Writing Minor
This 18-credit minor is designed to give students exposure and experience in the writing of fiction and nonfiction writing while providing them with ample opportunity to develop their craft as writers and to create a body of work in their genre of choice. Revision and multiple drafts are treated as a necessary element in the writing process, and are therefore a required part of each course.

The Writing Capstone experience is a 3-credit course in which students develop a substantial writing project of their own choice, whether a novel, graphic novel, memoir, three-act play, collection of poetry, series of essays, etc.. Interdisciplinary work and collaborations with other departments are also encouraged.

Requirements:
Any MECA student who has successfully completed a minimum of 30 credits and has achieved a 3.0 average or higher in EN 100/105 and EN 110/112 may apply to the writing minor. To apply, each student must fill out the Writing Minor Application Form (available in the Registrar’s Office) and have an interview with the Writing Minor Coordinator prior to the start of their third semester. The minor requires accumulating 18 credits as described below:

The Writing Minor pathway consists of:

  • EN 100/110 English Composition, 3 credits
  • EN 105/112 Introduction to Literature, 3 credits
  • NOTE: Only one of these can be applied to the minor. All honors sections apply to minor.
  • HU 323(W) Creative Writing or HU 326 (W) Fiction Writing, 3 credits
  • Writing Intensive Elective (1* or 2) look for the (W,) 6 credits*
  • HU 326 (W) Advanced Essay & Thesis Writing, 3 credits
  • HU 440 Writing Capstone, 3 credits

*Writing minors who have completed the Honors section of both English Composition and Introduction to Literature with a grade of 3.0 or higher will require only one (1) 3-credit Writing Intensive Elective.

Time on Task

A 3-credit studio course meets each week for six hours and assumes a minimum of another three hours will be spent outside of class to complete assignments. A 3-credit liberal arts or art history course meets each week for three hours and assumes a minimum of another six hours will be spent outside of class to complete assignments.

BFA Graduation Plan

BFA Graduation Plan

The BFA Graduation Plan maps a student’s pathway through the curriculum. At the end of each semester the Office of Registration & Academic Advising updates each student’s degree requirement control sheet with completed coursework, course numbers, semesters completed, and credits earned. Any questions about the accuracy of your control sheet should be directed to the Office of Registration & Academic Advising. Questions regarding course selection can be directed to your Academic Advisor or Faculty Mentor.

Please keep your control sheet handy when making enrollment decisions. Tracking your courses in relationship to your requirements is critical in both following the sequential learning necessary to successfully complete all course work and assuring one graduates on time.

Standards to Enter a Studio Major

1. Achieved Satisfactory Academic Progress with a minimum GPA of 2.0 (C)
2. Completed their first two years (60 credits)
3. Completed a minimum of two semesters of electives in your chosen major department with a grade of at least 2.7 (B-) in your second semester major studio elective.

*Exceptions to this policy may be made by the appropriate Program Chair and Dean of the College. Students seeking an exception should make this request in writing (email is fine) to the Program Chair and Dean of the College.

The Registrar will continue the approval process after the spring term grades are recorded. The Registrar will then send a report to the appropriate Program Chair regarding the academic standing of the incoming majors. Program chairs can decide to allow a student into a major on a probationary basis. This student then must achieve a GPA of 2.0 (C) or better within the studio major in the first term of majoring. Enrollment in a studio major may occur before the last four semesters if all prerequisites are met and departmental permission is obtained.

Standard to Maintain While Majoring

A minimum of nine major credit hours per semester is required while majoring. Students must maintain a minimum 2.0 (C) GPA each semester in the major studio courses. However, if a student’s major GPA falls below 2.0 (C) during the first semester of the first year of majoring, the student may remain in the major on probation. Failure to maintain a 2.0 (C) major GPA in any other semester will result in the student’s ineligibility to continue in that major.

Year by Year Curricular Requirements

Year One: Foundation
In the foundation year students develop essential skills, including a rigorous perceptual vocabulary across media and an understanding of the foundational academic issues in art and design. These courses foster collective inquiry, teach students how to access their creative potential, and help build trust and confidence in institutional community and self.

  • FN 113 Two-Dimensional Design, 3 credits
  • FN 115 Three-Dimensional Design, 3 credits
  • DR 100 Introduction to Drawing, 3 credits
  • FN 101 Digital Imaging (Basic, Drawing & Painting, Photography or 3-D), 3 credits
  • FYL 100 (PE) FY-IN, 3 credits
  • (2) Studio Electives, 6 credits
  • AH 101 Art History Survey I, 3 credits
  • EN 100 English Composition, 3 credits
  • EN 105 Introduction to Literature, 3 credits

Year Two: Expansion
The expansion year builds upon the foundational principles developed in the previous year, involving project-based work and expansive studio exploration, which includes experimentation with different disciplines, media, processes, ideas, motives, and communities. Students have a wide array of choices in this year and are encouraged to try new processes, media and disciplines.

  • AH 102 Art History Survey II, 3 credits
  • AH 250 Critical Approaches to Contemporary Art, 3 credits
  • SYL 200 Second Year Lab, 3 credits
  • WH 231 or 232 Diverse Cultures, 3 credits
  • WP 211 or 212 Issues in Ideology, 3 credits
  • Five Studio Electives, 15 credits

Year Three: Convergence
In year three, convergence, students enter the major and become grounded in their chosen discipline, begin to develop an independent voice and artistic identity, and work on focused historical, theoretical, contextual and social inquiry.

  • (2) Majors Studio Courses 6 credits
  • (2) Majors Electives 6 credits
  • Seminar: Introduction to the Discipline 3 credits
  • Seminar: Combined Junior Seminar (Craft, Fine Arts or Design/Media) 3 credits
  • (2) AH Electives 6 credits
  • (2) Liberal Arts Electives 6 credits

Year Four: Synthesis
In their synthesis year, students wed strong technical, aesthetic and critical thinking skills with the concurrent creation of a self-directed body of work and a written thesis. Together, Senior Synthesis, the written thesis course, and the studio major form the capstone experience, which culminates in the Senior Exhibition. Entrepreneurial and professional development courses are also embedded into the synthesis year and the term ends with a capstone experience.

  • (2) Majors Studio Courses, 6 credits
  • (2) Majors Electives, 6 credits
  • Seminar: Professional Studio, 3 credits
  • Seminar: Senior Synthesis, 3 credits
  • (4) Liberal Arts Electives, 12 credits

Core Studio-Seminars from First Year to Senior Year

A series of studio-seminars underlines MECA’s commitment to an education that cuts across disciplines. The studio-seminars bring together teachers and students from a range of disciplines, and provide time for research and discussion not always possible in a fast-paced studio class. The seminars include project-based learning, understanding art and design in a historical context, and various approaches to contemporary practice.

FYL 100 (PE) FY-IN
This seminar involves studio work, academic research, and involvement with a community partner. Its intent is to fully immerse you in art and design, to involve you in the MECA and Portland communities, and to place your creative efforts into a real-world context. FY-In teaches the critical importance of combining research and practice, and serves as an introduction to collaborating with one another and with a community partner. Students read, write, research, make art, discuss and critique while working on specific projects in their section. The course is required of all first-year students: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week.

SYL 200 Second Year Lab
This course is designed to immerse students in a sustained project in order to combine and advance objectives from their foundation year, develop the ability to take an idea from inception to completion, and introduce professional skills necessary to be an artist at work. Students will research, write, make, revise, remake, and present their work in a professional context. Within this interdisciplinary class, required of all second-year students, structured parameters create an environment in which students have the opportunity to work both individually and collaboratively while developing the skills to self-direct. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week. Prerequisite: Foundation courses completed. Required of students who entered MECA in or after Fall 2010. (PE) option typically available.

SEM 352 Junior Seminar: Design/Media Topics
The focus of this course will be how to best represent yourself and your work online. Students will learn the fundamentals of translating works for display online. Demonstrations and lectures will explore the potentials of social networking sites, open source software, and desktop web tools. Examples of successful web presences will be presented and discussed. Topics covered in this class will include online portfolio design and development, professional networking sites, and digital distribution opportunities among others. You will create, or continue to build your unique digital presence as an Artist, Designer, Photographer, or Illustrator. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week.

SEM 353 Junior Seminar: Fine Arts/Topics Contemporary Topics and Practice
This is a studio/discussion course designed to provide historical ideas, context and ground for students to more clearly define their own studio work and relationship to art history. Group conversations, field trips, in-process critiques, workshops and/or visiting artists will assist students in establishing strategies for studio research in order to isolate, identify, and pursue a meaningful subject(s) within a personal and art historical context. Students will practice voicing their attitudes, opinions and conclusions about the topics discussed in seminar and gain more confidence talking about their own practice within larger issues of history, society, and culture outside of the art world. Scheduled concurrently with other sections of junior seminar, faculty and students will have the opportunity to meet as a larger group when appropriate. Students outside of the fine arts disciplines may take this class as a studio elective. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week.

SEM 354 Junior Seminar: Crafts Issues/Topics
This course is designed to foster each student’s relationship within the historical context of crafts through the study and application of contemporary practice and theory. In coordination with all departments, course lectures, field trips, workshops and visiting artists will be selected to assist students in establishing strategies for studio research in order to isolate, identify, and pursue a meaningful subject(s) within a clearly defined personal and craft historical context. In addition each student will develop a more articulate understanding of their practice within a larger context of their specific discipline, history, society, and culture. Major requirement: 3 credits/ semester; 3 hours/week. This class may be taken by students outside of the crafts disciplines as a studio elective.

SEM 451 Professional Studio
This one-semester course is designed to deliver professional development information to seniors through presentations and lectures pertinent to artists and designers. How to establish a studio/community, to various ways of working with individuals and the public, to making a professional identity package, to managing finances are among the topics explored. In addition to lectures and tutorials, there may also be field trips connected to appropriate topics, as well as visiting artists and professionals such as a CPA and Maine Arts Commission. Class projects are designed to offer specific experiences and skills pertinent to the student’s professional development. Sections will be split into Fine Art, Design, Illustration, and Craft to focus area-specific professional information and assignments. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week.

SEM 452 Senior Synthesis
This course is taken in the final semester of the senior year. Students’ studio practice is integral to their work in this class, as they are led through a guided research and writing process to identify and explore the inspirations for their studio work, how those interests are played out historically, and what their relevance is to contemporary art and culture. The class will culminate in a fully articulated written thesis that explains and details their studio thesis work. Students will present their ideas at various points throughout the semester and conversations will be held about the ideas underlying their work both in the classroom and in individualized studio visits. Major requirement: 3 credits/ 6 hours per semester. Prerequisites: Senior Status.

Independent Study

MECA students have the opportunity to design their own independent study course and explore areas of interest not currently offered in our curriculum. To be eligible, a student must be at least a sophomore and have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B). Interested students must complete an Independent Study application form, available on the Office of Registration & Academic Advising Google site. The completed application should be delivered to the Dean’s Office by the posted deadline. A subcommittee of the Curriculum Committee will review all independent studies for approval or denial in the first week of the semester they will be performed; the committee then makes a recommendation to the Dean of the College, who either approves the proposal or denies it. The Dean’s decision is final. Deadlines are strict and are printed in the Academic Calendar. Upon receipt of appropriate approval, the Office of Registration & Academic Advising will automatically register the student in the course and provide documentation to the student. Internships and Independent Studies taken in the summer are applied to fall term. A lab fee will be applied.

Internships

Internships are available in a wide range of both studio and art administrative settings, and provide opportunities for students to explore first-hand the different venues in which their art knowledge and skills may be applied. To be eligible, a student must be in good academic standing (cumulative GPA of at least 2.0). Students may receive course credit while gaining professional, hands-on experience and building relationships with practicing professionals. Not infrequently, internships lead to summer or post-graduation employment opportunities, and become the basis for life and career defining decisions.

If you are interested in doing an internship, contact the Artists at Work Office for information on available placements. All internship applications must be submitted to Artists At Work who then passed the application on for approval by the Assistant Dean. Ideally, these are approved prior to the semester in which they will be performed; deadlines are published in the Academic Calendar. Upon receipt of appropriate approval, the Office of Registration & Academic Advising will automatically register the student in the course and provide documentation to the student. Internships and Independent Studies taken in the summer are applied to fall term. A lab fee will be applied.

Academic Policies

Enrollment Rules

Students are not permitted to attend classes until all outstanding College bills are paid. Students may not register for courses until adequate proof of immunization is filed with the Registration & Academic Advising Office. A student will not receive a grade for a course unless he or she is properly registered for it. A student may receive a failing grade for a course he or she stops attending unless a drop form or exit form has been completed and submitted. It is the student’s responsibility to submit the necessary forms and to be aware of credit-load status and refund period deadlines. Students who are not achieving satisfactory academic progress will not be allowed to continue their enrollment at Maine College of Art. Any student who creates a disruption or interferes with instruction of a class may be removed from that course. Any student who causes harm to another student, or to faculty or staff, may be asked to leave the College. Students receiving financial aid are governed by the policies outlined in the catalog.

The Registrar may revoke full or partial registration at any time for lack of proper immunization records, non- payment of financial obligations to the school, or failure to complete academic prerequisites, including failure to participate in required reviews. The College reserves the right at any time to change the course offerings, fees, calendar, rules and regulations governing admission and registration.

With enrollment in any class, a student consents to being photographed in student activities on- or off-campus. These photographs may be used in promotional efforts without specific written permission from the student. The College may also use reproductions of student work in promotional materials.

Determination of Class Level in the BFA

All students achieve class levels solely based on the accumulation of credits.

  • First Year: 0 – 30 credits
  • Sophomore: 31 – 60 credits
  • Junior: 61 – 90 credits
  • Senior: 91 credits and above

**Based on the current 120 credit curriculum

Class level designation is used to determine financial aid award eligibility. Failure to complete a course with credit or enrollment in less than the optimum number of credits per semester could result in less aid in the future. Transfer credits are included in the calculation of class level. Students receiving financial aid who are making decisions about dropping classes or not registering for a full load should speak to a staff member of the Financial Aid Office.

Add and Drop Procedures

Add/Drop forms are available online within the Registration & Academic Advising site and in paper form outside the Assistant Registrar’s office. Deadlines for adding/dropping classes are listed in the academic calendar and on the actual form. It is the student’s responsibility to submit the necessary forms and to be aware of credit-load and refund period deadlines. Failure to submit a Add/Drop form can result in not getting credit for your work or can result in a grade of “F” in the course. These forms are also used to determine eligibility for refunds.

In order to add or drop a class:
Complete the student portion on the top of the form found in the Registrar Office.

  • Adding: Obtain the signature of the professors on your form, then return form to the Registrar’s Office.
  • Dropping: You can drop a class within the first two weeks without a professor’s signature. Simply complete your portion and submit to the Registrar’s Office, which will then email your professor for you.

Please note that English Composition and Art History Survey cannot be dropped without counsel. These courses are prerequisites for all further academic courses.

Withdrawals for a Single Class

A “W” grade indicates that the student withdrew from the course after the add/ drop period. A withdrawal (W) receives no credit. The “W” is not figured into the grade point average (GPA) but counts towards attempted credits. A student who withdraws from a course after the Drop Period but during the Withdrawal Period (the third through the eighth weeks of a semester) will receive an automatic grade of “W”. The instructor’s signature is not required to withdraw from a course during the Withdrawal Period. After the eighth week of the semester, a student withdrawing from a class will receive a letter grade designated to be determi the instructor. Exceptions for cause (e.g. illness) may be made by the course instructor, on a case-by-case basis. Doctor’s certification may be required. Withdrawals do not affect the student’s grade point average.

Attendance Policy

Regular class attendance is mandatory at MECA. Attendance is an essential condition for success in the BFA program. Students are expected to attend all class sessions and required course-related activities. Students, whether present or absent, are responsible for obtaining all material presented and completing all course assignments. Course material and demonstrations cannot typically be repeated on an individual basis. Absence from a course does not relieve the student from the obligation of course work, exams, critiques or discussions.

More than two unexcused absences will lower your grade one full mark. (For example, a B becomes an B-, a B- becomes a C+, and so on). Arrive on time. Do not leave early. Three instances of arriving late and/or leaving early without permission of the instructor constitute one absence. Seven or more absences, unexcused or not, will result in a failing grade. In the case of courses that meet once a week, two absences will result in lowering your grade two full marks (an A becomes a B+, a B+ becomes a B- and so on), and three absences, unexcused or not, will result in a failing grade.

In consultation with the Assistant Dean, a “W” grade may be granted by the instructor for legitimate medical or qualifying personal reasons if too much class time has been missed for successful completion of the course.

Students who are seriously ill should not come to class and should notify their faculty as soon as possible.

MECA Alert

Whenever an instructor observes that a student’s absences are adversely affecting performance and may ultimately result in the lowering of a grade or failure, or if for any reason a student seems to be experiencing serious difficulties in the class, the instructor should use the MECA Alert system to report concerns.

The MECA Alert system is a centralized student referral system for faculty, staff, students and parents to use. Every legitimate referral will be carefully reviewed, responded to, and forwarded to the appropriate staff or faculty member. All information will be held in appropriate confidence.

Statement on Religious Observance for MECA Students

MECA respects the religious beliefs of all members of the community, affirms their rights to observe significant religious holy days, and will make reasonable accommodations, upon request, for such observances. If one’s religious observance is in conflict with the academic experience, the student should inform his/her instructor(s) of the class or other school functions that will be affected. It is the student’s responsibility to make the necessary arrangements mutually agreed upon with the instructor(s).

Types of instances/absences that the policy supports:

Class absence: Excused absence from a scheduled academic class/classes due to a religious conflict that falls on the same day as the class itself. Missing a class due to travel associated with a particular holiday does not constitute an excused absence and faculty do not have to consider such requests for accommodations.

Missed exam: Excused absence from an exam scheduled on a date/time in conflict with a religious holy day. Reasonable accommodations can be made to take the exam earlier or later than the date/time in conflict. If an instructor requires a make-up exam, the instructor retains the right to determine the content of the exam and the conditions of its administration, with considerations given to equitable treatment. Missing an exam due to travel associated with a particular holiday does not constitute an excused absence and faculty do not have to consider such requests for accommodations.

Deadline conflict: Reasonable accommodations may be made for academic work that is due on a date/time in conflict with a religious holy day. In such cases work may be submitted earlier or later than the date in conflict. Missing a deadline due to travel associated with a particular holiday does not constitute an excused absence and faculty do not have to consider such requests for accommodations.

Audit Policy

Current matriculated MECA students may audit MECA classes within their program of matriculation by permission of the instructor. They will be allowed to do so on a space-available basis, and will be accommodated after all credit-seeking students are registered. They will register through the Registrar’s Office, and will be charged full tuition and fees.
Individuals who are not currently matriculated MECA students may take classes at MECA – either for credit or as an audit – only after they have applied and been admitted to the program offering the class. They may apply for either “special or non-degree” student status or as degree candidates. Once admitted, they may audit MECA classes within their program of matriculation by permission of the instructor. They will be allowed to do so on a space- available basis, and will be accommodated after all credit-seeking student are registered. They will register through the Registrar’s Office, and will be charged full tuition and fees.

Graduation Requirements

The Bachelors of Fine Arts degree is awarded to students who have earned 120 credits (according to the curricular distribution requirements) and who have met the following criteria:

  • Completion of all course credit requirements with a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of not less than 2.0.
  • Completion of all studio major requirements with a grade point average (GPA) in the major of not less than 2.0.
  • Completion of all requirements within the parameters of Satisfactory Academic Progress.
  • Presentation of work in the Senior Thesis Exhibition and Index Show.
  • Submitted Intent to Graduate Application to the College Registrar’s Office.
  • Completed a Financial Aid Exit Interview (for students receiving federal loans).
  • Satisfied all financial obligations to Maine College of Art.
  • Returned all books to the Joanne Waxman Library (even if they are not overdue).
  • Returned all equipment borrowed from the College.

*NOTE: All credit requirements must be completed to participate in Commencement ceremonies.

Graduating with Honors

The BFA degree is awarded “with honors” to those who have a cumulative grade point average (GPA of 3.5 or better) for the years of study at Maine College of Art.

Commencement Policy

Maine College of Art believes that commencement is a degree granting ceremony. Therefore commencement is strictly reserved for students who have completed all degree requirements. This policy applies to all degree programs. Though MECA informs students about their status through annual degree audits, ultimately it is the student who is responsible for identifying requirements and completing necessary courses. Students are responsible for the selection of courses, the completion of all degree requirements, and familiarization with all regulations pertaining to their degree status. Students who have not completed all degree requirements cannot walk at commencement.

Formal commencement ceremonies are held every year in May. Only students who have completed all BFA graduation requirements will be permitted to participate in commencement. Students who complete degree requirements after May obtain their diploma from the Registrar’s Office; these students may also participate in the formal commencement ceremony the following May. Exceptions to this policy will only be made in extreme circumstances that are clearly beyond the student’s control. Appeal for an exception should be made in writing to the Dean of the College no less than ten days before commencement.

Directory Information: Disclosure Policy & Solomon Amendment

The College normally will not supply non-related organizations with personally identifiable student information, including “directory information.” Active students who wish to have directory information withheld from release must do so in writing on a “per academic-year” basis. Please remember: Active students must renew a request for nondisclosure each year to keep such requests in effect.

One exception to this policy is the result of a federal law known as the “Solomon Amendment” which requires the College to release directory information to military recruiters upon request. For this purpose, directory information is defined as: name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, level of education, academic major, degrees received, and educational institution in which a student most recently was enrolled. Information not required or permitted by the Solomon Amendment and not considered directory information under FERPA will not be released without written permission of the student.

FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are:

The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day Maine College of Art receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Registrar’s Office written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the Registrar’s Office, the student shall be advised of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.

The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate. Students may ask Maine College of Art to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the Registrar, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If Maine College of Art decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the student shall be notified of the decision and advised as to his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by Maine College of Art in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom Maine College of Art has contracted (such services (such as an attorney, auditor, consultant, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. As allowed within FERPA guidelines, Maine College of Art may disclose education records without consent to officials of another school, upon request, in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Maine College of Art to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Washington, DC, 20202-4605. At its discretion Maine College of Art may provide Directory Information in accordance with the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act. Directory Information is defined as that information which would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. Designated Directory Information at Maine College of Art includes the following: student name, permanent address, local address, temporary address, electronic mail address, telephone number, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities, theses titles/topics, photograph, full- time/part-time status, most recent previous school attended, date and place of birth, class schedule. Students may withhold Directory Information by notifying the Registrar in writing; please note that such withholding requests are binding for all information to all parties other than for those exceptions allowed under the Act. Students should consider all aspects of a Directory Hold prior to filing such a request. Although the initial request must be filed during the first two weeks of the enrollment period, requests for nondisclosure will be honored by the for no more than one academic year. Re-authorization to withhold Directory Information must be filed annually in the Registrar’s Office within the first two weeks of the fall semester.

Grading Policies

Grade Reports

Grades are available on-line using MyMECA. Printed grades can be mail upon request.

Grading System
Letter grades are assigned based on the chart below, and record the level of student performance. Plus and minus grades are computed into grade point averages. Grades are permanent after one year.

  • 4.0 A Excellent
  • 3.7 A-
  • 3.5 B+
  • 3.0 B Above average
  • 2.7 B-
  • 2.5 C+
  • 2.0 C Average
  • 1.7 C-
  • 1.5 D+
  • 1.0 D Below average
  • 0.7 D-
  • 0.0 F Failed
  • 0.0 I Incomplete (The student must make up an “I” incomplete grade within 30 days;* otherwise, it becomes an F)
  • 0.0 W Withdrawal
  • 0.0 FR Failed & Repeated (Original grade is forgiven)

Failed & Repeated Classes
A student may repeat a failed course, and the original “F” grade will be replaced with a “FR” (failed & repeated) grade. The “FR” grade will remain on the transcript, along with the new grade earned during the second attempt. Students must notify the Registrar that they are repeating a course to improve their grade. (See Evaluation of Satisfactory Academic Progress for further details.)

Incomplete Grades

Incomplete grades are granted only for mitigating circumstances and are given at the course instructor’s discretion only. The student must make up an “I” incomplete grade within 30 days;* otherwise, it becomes an F.

Mid-term Grades
Midterm grades reflect a student’s academic progress at about the sixth week into the semester. Although midterm grades are not part of a student’s permanent record and will not be reflected in the semester grade point average (GPA), they are important indicators of academic performance. Midterm grades are meant to encourage students to get in touch with their instructors and to request academic assistance if it is needed.

Dean’s List and Honors
The Dean’s list is for students earning a semester grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 or better. The BFA degree is awarded “with honors” to those who have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 or better for their years of study at Maine College of Art.

Appealing a Grade
To appeal a grade, a student must contact, in writing, the course instructor who issued the original grade. The appeal must include a detailed explanation for the reason of the appeal. If the student is not satisfied with the instructor’s response, he/she may appeal in writing to the Dean of the College. A copy of the original written appeal and the instructor’s response to the appeal must be included with the written appeal to the Dean. The Dean will call a meeting of an Appeal Committee, which shall consist of one faculty member selected by the student, one faculty member selected by the instructor, and one faculty or staff member selected by the Dean of the College. The committee shall make a recommendation to the Dean of the College. Every reasonable effort will be made to convene this committee; however, if circumstances are such that the committee cannot be organized in a reasonable amount of time, the Dean has the authority to make a final decision independently, after review of relevant materials.

Evaluation of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

The academic records of degree-seeking students are regularly reviewed by the Registrar to ensure that each student is making satisfactory academic progress. Each measure is reviewed at the conclusion of each semester, and is used to determine whether or not a student is in good academic standing. Three measures are used in evaluating a student’s standing:

1. Qualitative Measure of Satisfactory Academic Progress: Every student must achieve a semester grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C ) or above to remain in good academic standing. This measure is reviewed at the conclusion of each semester, and is used to determine whether or not a student is in good academic standing. A student with a semester GPA below 2.0 is put on an Academic Probation Status in which they continue to be eligible for financial aid. Any student who has earned a semester grade point average below 2.0 for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the College and may not be eligible for financial aid. This measure is not affected by full-time or part-time enrollment status.
* See also student admitted on probation.

2. Quantitative Measure of Satisfactory Academic Progress: Students must complete at least 67% of cumulative attempted credit hours. The completion rate is defined as the percentage of the total number of credits earned divided by the total number of credits attempted over the entirety of a student’s academic record. Any transfer credits and remedial credits on the student’s record are included when computing the student’s completion rate. This measure is reviewed at the conclusion of each semester, and is used to determine whether or not a student is in good academic standing. A student who has earned less than 67% during a semester is put on an Academic Probation Status in which they continue to be eligible for financial aid. A student who has not successfully completed at least 67% of coursework attempted for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the College and may not be eligible for financial aid.

(Credits Completed / Credits Attempted) x 100 = Completion Rate

3. Maximum Time Frame: Federal regulations allow financial aid recipients to receive financial aid for a maximum number of attempted credits. Students attempting credits in excess of 150% of the required number of credits to complete their program of study will be ineligible for financial aid. MECA’s formula for maximum time to complete the program is based on the total number of credit hours required for the degree: 120 credits x 150% = 180 maximum credits that can be attempted.

The following are included in the calculation of allowable maximum time frame:

  • Changes in major
  • Adding a minor degree
  • Incomplete grades
  • Repeated courses
  • Second degrees
  • Transfer credits

Advanced Placement (AP) Credits: are not included in the qualitative measure of satisfactory academic progress but are included in the quantitative measure.

Incomplete grades (I grades): If, at the time satisfactory academic progress is reviewed, the student has an incomplete on his/her record and is not meeting satisfactory academic progress, no exception is made. If the student completes the incomplete within the 30-day time frame, they can request a re-review of satisfactory academic progress. Failure to complete automatically changes the grade to “F.” The “F” grade will be included in the quantitative and qualitative measures.

Transfer Credits: Are not included in the qualitative measure of satisfactory academic progress but are included in the quantitative measure.

Failed Repeat Courses (FR grades): When a student repeats a course that was previously failed, only the new grade and credit earned are included in the qualitative measure of academic progress. However, both the subsequent credits earned and the original credits unsuccessfully attempted are included in the quantitative measure. In other words, a repeated course may improve a student’s grade point average, but it does not extend the allowable attempted credits toward degree completion. Both courses must be taken at Maine College of Art.

AICAD Mobility and Student Exchange Grades: Grades earned through the AICAD (Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design) mobility program are included in both the qualitative and quantitative measures of satisfactory academic progress. Due to the time needed to transfer academic records, these evaluations may be delayed beyond the usual evaluation timetable. Grades earned in other student exchange programs are not included in the qualitative measure of satisfactory progress but are included in the quantitative measure.

Midterm Grades: Midterm grades reflect a student’s academic progress at about the sixth to eighth week into the semester. Although midterm grades are not part of a student’s permanent record and will not be reflected in the semester grade point average (GPA), they are important indicators of how a student is doing academically. Midterm grades are meant to encourage students to get in touch with their instructors and to request academic assistance if it is needed.

Academic Sanctions

The following actions are taken when a student fails to achieve satisfactory academic progress in the BFA program as ascertained by either of the College’s measures.

Students Admitted to MECA on Academic Probation

The Director of Admissions will determine if a student is to be admitted to the college on Academic Probation and will notify that student in writing. A student who achieves a 2.0 or better in his/her first semester will be removed from Academic Probation. If a student’s GPA falls below a 1.7 (C-) during their first semester, s/he will be academically dismissed.

In order to ensure academic success, every student who enters MECA on Academic Probation is required to meet with the academic tutor within the first two weeks of the semester. The tutor will develop a contract of goals and expectations that the student must follow. This contract will be on record. Students who fail to comply will be subject to dismissal.

Academic Probation: Students who earn a semester grade point average below 2.0 and/or have earned less than 67% of their attempted credit hours are placed on Academic Probation for the following semester. Students remain Title IV Financial Aid eligible while on academic probation. See Satisfactory Academic Progress.

Academic Dismissal: A student who is not making Satisfactory Academic Progress, as ascertained by qualitative, quantitative or maximum time-frame measurements will be academically dismissed. See Satisfactory Academic Progress.

Appeal of Dismissal: Students may appeal to the Dean of the College for a reversal of an academic dismissal and a one-time exception to the qualitative, quantitative and/or maximum time-frame measures of satisfactory academic progress. The appeal must be in writing and must be submitted within thirty (30) days of official notification of dismissal. The formal appeal letter must be accompanied by third-party documentation detailing the circumstances as to why satisfactory academic progress was not maintained and what has changed that will permit the student to make satisfactory academic progress by the end of the upcoming semester. Both the appeal and the documentation should also address the possibility of the circumstances recurring within 30 days of official notification of dismissal. Appeals will be considered from students who have been laboring under adverse circumstances beyond their control, including illness or injury (student or a close relative), death of a relative, or family emergency. Customarily the Dean will convene an appeal committee of at least three employees to review the appeal. The committee typically consists of the student’s mentor or program chair, an employee of the college selected by the student, and another employee selected by the Dean. The committee will interview the student, review his/her work from all courses, and, if necessary, speak with other faculty and staff who have worked with the student. The appeal committee will submit its findings to the Dean in the form of a recommendation, and the Dean will decide whether to uphold the dismissal or permit the student to be readmitted on a probationary basis. The Dean of the College also reserves the right to forgo the committee process and review the appeal directly. The student will be notified of the appeal decision within thirty (30) days of the Dean’s receipt of the appeal or before the start of the next enrollment period, whichever comes first.

Transfer Credit Policy

Prior to your arrival on campus, the Admissions Office in conjunction with the program chairs will determine transfer credit evaluation and placement. Please note that transfer placement is studio driven and determined on a case-by-case, individual basis.

MECA will award up to 60 credits in transfer for courses matching our curriculum and completed with a grade of C or better. Only credits completed at regionally accredited colleges, universities or post-secondary professional schools will be considered. No more than 30 credits will be awarded for humanities coursework, 15 for art history coursework, and 36 in studio coursework. Official college transcripts and course descriptions for all such coursework are required. Visual documentation must be submitted in slide or digital format, from all courses for which studio credit is sought. Please make sure that all work submitted is clearly labeled with your first and last name.

If you are a current MECA student who is planning to take a summer course and you would like to receive transfer credits for this work please refer to the following:

  • Make sure the school you would like to attend is regionally accredited.
  • Find the course(s) you are interested in taking and print the course description(s).
  • Bring the course descriptions to the Office of Registration & Academic Advising to determine whether the course or courses are transferable.
  • Once the course or courses are complete you will need to submit an official transcript to the Office of Registration & Academic Advising.
  • Courses completed with a grade of C or better.
  • Once the transcript is received you will need to follow-up with the Office of Registration & Academic Advising to see if any further information is needed. Please note that the above transfer Credit Policy will apply.

Leave of Absence and Withdrawal

If a student decides not to continue at Maine College of Art, he/she may either withdraw or take a leave of absence. Students who are in good academic standing may take a leave of absence for up to four semesters and then return to MECA without reapplying for admission.

A student who does not plan to return to the college, must formally withdraw. In either case, you must complete the proper paperwork (Exit-LOA form). Non-attendance does not constitute notification of intent to exit. Your exit date is the date the College is formally notified and the exit is completed.

A student withdrawing during the first eight weeks of a semester will have a permanent record of registration with all courses carrying a grade of “W.” A student withdrawing after the eighth week of classes will have a grade issued by the professor. A student withdrawing before the start of a semester will have their registration completely removed from their academic record. Tuition refunds will be issued according to the enrollment agreement each student signs. Students who are receiving financial aid may need to follow additional procedures and guidelines pertaining to credit loads and financial aid exit interviews. For further information, contact the Financial Aid Office directly (telephone 207-699-5074 or 5073).

Voluntary Medical Leave Policy

A medical leave is a leave of absence from Maine College of Art (MECA) based on a qualified and documented medical issue. A medical leave may be taken for up to four (4) consecutive semesters. If a medical leave is granted during a semester already in progress, that semester shall count as the first of the four semesters. A medical leave is initiated by the student and supported by documentation provided by a medical professional. MECA may request additional documentation from a provider to make a final decision.

Initial Request: A student requesting a medical leave must complete an Exit Notification Form with the Registrar indicating his/her request for a medical leave. When the Exit Notification Form is submitted, it must be accompanied by documentation from a medical professional that specifies: 1) the reason(s) for the leave (i.e. diagnosis), 2) the reason(s) the leave is needed (i.e. the symptoms), 3) the expected duration of the leave, and 4) the criteria under which the medical professional will be able to recommend the student’s re-entry at MECA.

Review: Within forty-eight (48) business hours of receiving the completed Exit Notification Form and medical documentation, the Director of Student Life (or designee) will review the submitted documentation and contact members of the MECA community to discuss the case. Based on the documentation, the Director of Student Life (or designee) will inform the student of the decision in writing; in the event that a decision is made not to grant a leave of absence, this notification shall also include a description of the appeal process.

Grading: A medical leave effectively withdraws a student from all enrolled classes. The student’s instructors will assign a grade of withdraw (W) or if requested by the student, the grade the student has earned up to the date of the withdrawal taking into consideration requirements for the whole semester.

Request to Return: When a student who has voluntarily withdrawn wishes to return to MECA, s/he must submit a reentry letter to the Director of Student Life requesting a return to the College. The letter should include detailed and comprehensive written documentation from a medical professional that indicates: (1) symptoms, (2) current and future treatment plan, (3) reason(s) that the voluntary medical withdrawal no longer poses a significant risk or threat to the health and safety of the individual student and/or the MECA Community, and (4) that the student is capable of successfully returning to MECA. The Director of Student Affairs (or designee) shall review the submitted documentation and contact members of the MECA community to discuss the case. Based on the documentation and advice, the Director of Student Life(or designee) shall inform the student of the decision in writing; in the event that a decision is made not to grant a return, the notification will also include a description of the appeal process. If readmitted, the student must adhere to any conditions set forth in the letter by the Director of Student Life (or designee). If a student does not adhere to these conditions, the student may be removed from MECA at any point through due process established within the Student Code of Conduct.

Appeal: A student may appeal a denial of either the request for a medical leave or the request to return from medical leave. This appeal, along with a report from the Director of Student Life (or designee) must be submitted in writing to the Dean of the College. The Dean of the College has the ultimate authority for the medical leave process.

Additional Information
Relationship of Medical Leave to the Student Conduct Code: All MECA students are accountable to the standards articulated in the Student Conduct Code. A student’s decision to pursue a medical leave in no way suggests that the student will not be held accountable if his/her behavior was in violation of the Student Conduct Code.

Campus Access: A student on a voluntary leave may maintain contact with the MECA community with permission of the Director of Student Life (or designee).

Confidentiality: All information received and/or reviewed during the medical leave process, will be held in the strictest confidence and shall constitute the working papers of the Director of Student Life (or designee) rather than a component of the student’s official academic file. Documentation and official letters of notice written by an agent of MECA shall be considered part of the student’s file and not that of the academic file. An academic file will only disclose that the student is on leave for a standard amount of time.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is defined as the use without attribution of languages, images, ideas, or the organization of ideas not one’s own. It is considered to be a fundamental breach of basic academic principles and is prohibited in all courses. The development of original thinking and intellectual honesty is regarded as central to MECA’s pedagogy. Although in the pursuit of these goals students continually consult existing works, it is expected that they acknowledge the debt owed to others by citing all sources. Unless group work is assigned, coursework is normally completed independently. If books, journals, magazine, or any other sources are reviewed and the ideas or language therein used, they must be cited. Students should consult a reference source on proper notation.

Evidence of plagiarism results in a grade of F for the assignment and may, at the discretion of the faculty, lead to a grade of F in the course. In addition, the Dean of the College may impose further sanctions (such as probation or dismissal). For complete information, see the Student Conduct Code in the Student Handbook.

Prerequisites

Many courses have prerequisites, which are noted at the end of each course description. Be sure you have completed the prerequisites for any courses for which you want to register. In addition, please note that many courses are sequential from fall to spring.

Immunization Policy

Maine Law requires all degree-seeking students and full-time, non-degree students born after December 31, 1956 to provide the following proof of immunization:

  • One (1) dose of Tetanus/Diphtheria (Td or Tdap) received within the last ten (10) years.
  • Two (2) doses of Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) received after (not on) the first birthday. If measles immunization was done prior to 1968, students must provide proof it was done with a live virus.

Immunization records must indicate the date of immunization and are REQUIRED to be signed or stamped from one of the following sources:

  • Healthcare provider
  • High school
  • Military base
  • Previous college
  • Titre tests with positive results for immunity to Measles, Mumps and Rubella are accepted as long as they are signed or stamped and clearly indicate immunity to all three diseases.

Academic Programs & Services

AICAD and the AICAD Mobility Program

MECA students benefit from the cooperative programs and built-in access to leading art schools that are members of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD). By sharing resources and facilities, AICAD colleges offer educational opportunities that, taken together, are without parallel in professional arts education. Through the Student Mobility Program, qualified students at one AICAD school can spend a semester at another participating AICAD school without additional cost or loss of credit. It is very important to discuss your interest in participating in the Mobility/ Exchange program with your Faculty Mentor and/or Major Program Chair. View the AICAD website.

Through the New York Studio Program, qualified students can spend a semester studying in New York. Selected students also have the opportunity to study at the Burren College of Art in Ireland. Students should contact the Office of Registration and Academic Advising (telephone 207.699.5057 or 5054) for more information on these programs. Application deadlines are April 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the winter semester.

Grades earned through the AICAD (Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design) mobility program are included in both the qualitative and quantitative measures of satisfactory academic progress. Due to the time needed to transfer academic records, these evaluations may be delayed beyond the usual evaluation timetable. Grades earned in other student exchange programs are not included in the qualitative measure of satisfactory progress but are included in the quantitative measure.

Curriculum Fair

The annual Curriculum Fair, held each spring, marks the beginning of the registration process for the following year. Faculty from each department and area are available to answer questions and discuss courses and majors. Staff from the Registrar’s Office distribute the fall and spring course schedule and registration materials, and are available to assist students.

Office of Registration & Academic Advising

The office of the registrar exists to serve the needs of the students, to respond to faculty and administrative requests for data, and to safeguard the integrity of the institution’s records and degrees.

Student Reviews

End of term reviews or critiques are held twice a year during the first year and at least once each year during the sophomore and junior years, and are required for all students. Pass/fail grades are assigned. During a review, the student meets with a team of faculty to view a body of work assembled by the student. Reviews provide the opportunity to discuss the student’s progress and to recognize common themes in works from different courses. Attendance and participation in all foundation and major reviews are mandatory.

Guidelines for Foundation Reviews

  • You should plan to arrive at least 30 minutes before your scheduled time. It is helpful to have done a practice set up of your work in the same room you are to show your work.
  • Bring lots of work from all foundation and studio elective classes. Also bring papers and writings from English Composition, Art History and other Liberal Arts classes.
  • Two or three weeks before your review, ask your faculty and advisor any questions you have about the reviews, what they like to talk about when they participate in reviews and what you can do to better prepare for your review.
  • An effective presentation allows space between both two- and three-dimensional works. It encourages the viewer to walk amongst three-dimensional work, and to see the relationship to drawing and two- dimensional design. Avoid crowding works together. Find relationships. Arrange tables, pedestals, and chairs in the room so that your work can be seen clearly.
  • You will be nervous, especially if this is your first review. Remember, this is a supportive process that seeks to help you see more in your work, to help you identify your strengths, and to learn how to use them to your advantage.
  • In preparation for your review, think of questions,you would like to explore or have answered.
  • Don’t hesitate to show work that you feel was not particularly successful. It is possible to gain as much benefit and insight from discussing less successful attempts at something new as from successful work. In general, it is always better to have a lot of work at your review rather than not enough.
  • You must ask a friend to attend your review, to listen and take notes. This will give you something to review regarding the issues that are discussed.
  • Enjoy your work! Foundation Reviews are grade Pass/Fail and are recorded on student transcripts.

Transcript Requests

Transcript request forms are available online. Each student pays a one-time transcript fee upon initial enrollment and no per-transcript fee is charged. It is important to note that official transcripts will not be released with outstanding financial obligations to the school. Transcript processing takes seven business days.

Veteran Benefits

Maine College of Art programs are approved for military personnel, veterans, and their eligible dependents under various educational assistance programs. The Registrar of the College is the Certifying Official and can be reached at adennison@meca.edu. Please notify the registrar upon admission to the college if you will be receiving VA benefits.

To apply for veterans educational benefits online, search for the VONAPP (Veterans Online Application) on the Dept. of Veterans Affairs website. Prior to applying, please read the latest update on the Post- 9/11 GI Bill and contact the Department of Veterans Affairs (1.888.442.4551, prompts 1 then 0) to discuss your eligibility. The election of CH 33 is irrevocable; the service member or veteran will need to make the best decision on which program benefits them most – staying with the Montgomery GI Bill or electing the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Representatives with the Department of Veterans Affairs in Buffalo, NY are available to counsel members on a comparison of both program benefits.

One month before classes begin the Registrar will submit an electronic enrollment certification to the Department of Veterans Affairs on your behalf. This certification will included the number of credit hours authorized towards completion of degree, tuition and fees for the term.. An undergraduate student would receive maximum monthly entitlement with full-time status of 12 credit hours or more for Fall or Spring semester. Please contact the Registrar with any questions you might have on veterans’ educational benefits. Thank you for all that you do and for your service to our country.

Student Policies

Disability Services, Policies & Procedures

Maine College of Art (MECA) is committed to providing equal access for students with disabilities. Under the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and its amendments, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, MECA provides reasonable accommodations to qualified students with documented disabilities. We encourage self-advocacy and early identification of need. Students can expect to work collaboratively with the disability services coordinator to develop an individualized plan for specific accommodations.

Students must contact the Disability Services Coordinator in order to initiate the process and make requests for accommodations. It is recommended that students seeking services contact the coordinator prior to or upon admission. The determination of disability-related accommodations and support services does not affect MECA’s admission process. The coordinator will guide students through the process and procedures to access services.

Students can expect that some previous K-12 accommodations may not continue in the college setting and a student’s active role in the process of receiving accommodations becomes essential to accessing accommodations. As such, the Disability Services Coordinator strives to individually assess student needs and provide supportive strategies to gain self-advocacy skills and increase awareness of student responsibility.

Brief Step-by-step guide:

  • Admitted or enrolled at Maine College of Art
  • Student discloses need for services/accommodations to the Disability Services Coordinator
  • Student completes application and waiver form
  • Student provides documentation
  • Coordinator reviews student’s request with documentation
  • Implementation and completion of accommodations or appeals process
  • Each semester, student requests an accommodation memo and notifies faculty of approved accommodation needs

 

 

Support Services

Services for students with disabilities are provided to promote full participation in programs and activities at MECA. The Disability Services Coordinator has the role of reviewing documentation and determining effective and reasonable accommodations. Specific information about the procedures for requesting accommodations may be obtained by contacting the coordinator, Joanne Benica at disabilityservices@meca.edu or 207-699-5035 (phone)/207-775-5087 (fax).

Students who need auxiliary services will be permitted to use aids such as digital recorders, Braille or recorded texts, sign language interpreters, note takers or other adaptive equipment. The college’s responsibility for providing auxiliary aids will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

The college does not provide wheelchairs, hearing aids, personal attendants, and other kinds of personal devices or services.

Documentation Guidelines for Disability Services

Students are not required to notify the college of their disability either prior to or after the admission process. However, if students with disabilities wish to request support services or program modification on the basis of disability, the college must receive reasonable advance notice of such needs. In addition, the college may require that students provide evidence/documentation that identifies the nature of the disability and its current, functional impact. The following should be included in the documentation:

  • Name, credentials and contact information of the evaluator
  • The nature of the disability and relevant history
  • Test results, including scores and written evaluation of scores
  • A description of how the disability impacts engagement in day to day activities as related to life at college
  • Names of any medications and potential side effects
  • Suggested accommodations

It is important to note that submission of documentation does not ensure accommodations. Students must also meet with the Disability Services Coordinator to engage in the interactive process to determine reasonable accommodations.

Documentation should be authored by a licensed clinical professional or health care provider, who is trained and qualified to evaluate the disability and familiar with the student’s history. Documentation may not be provided by a student’s relative, friend or family member. Accommodations are determined based on documentation content, student’s self-report and the coordinator’s evaluation at intake. Once determined, accommodations remain the same for the duration of a student’s tenure at MECA. Students who experience a change in their disability and accommodations needs, must contact the Disability Services Coordinator for review. Additional documentation may be requested at this time of review. All documentation must be on official letterhead, include the title, professional credentials as well as licensing and certification information, and signed by a qualified evaluator. Below are examples of documentation by disability type.

Examples of Documentation by Disability

Disability

Appropriate Documentation

ADHD/ADD Neuropsychological/Psychoeducational Testing and Report AND/OR

Statement from psychiatrist, nurse practitioner, primary care doctor or other qualified clinical professional

Autism Spectrum Disorder Neuropsychological/Psychoeducational Testing and Report AND/OR

Statement from psychiatrist, nurse practitioner, primary care doctor or other qualified clinical professional

Blind and Low Vision Report from ophthalmologist or optometrist AND/OR

Documentation from an agency that specializes in working with individuals who are blind or have low vision i.e. Iris Network, Bureau of Rehabilitation Division for the Blind Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Report from audiologist or otolaryngologist including audiogram AND/OR

Documentation from an agency that specializes in working with individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing i.e. Maine Center on Deafness, Division for the Deaf

Learning Disability Neuropsychological/Psychoeducational Testing and Report
Medical Statement from physician, medical specialist, physical therapist, occupational therapist or other qualified clinical professional
Mental Health Statement from psychiatrist, nurse practitioner, primary care doctor other qualified clinical professional
Physical and Neurological Statement from physician, medical specialist, physical therapist, occupational therapist or other qualified clinical professional AND/OR

Documentation from an agency that specializes in working with individuals with barriers to physical movement i.e. Office of Adults with Cognitive and Physical Disabilities Speech and Language

Speech and Language Neuropsychological/Psychoeducational Testing and Report AND/OR

Documentation from Medical Speech-Language Pathologist, Speech Therapist or other qualified clinical professional

Traumatic Brain Injury and other Cognitive Disabilities Neuropsychological/Psychoeducational Testing and Report AND/OR

Statement from physician, physical therapist, occupational therapist or other qualified clinical professional

Items not suitable for documentation include but are not limited to: Prescription bottles, prescriptions, hand written notes on prescription pads, IEP without corresponding testing results, documentation provided by certified but not licensed professionals.

Specific Learning Disabilities

Students with Specific Learning Disabilities requesting access must present specific additional documentation to comply with ADA and Section 504. The eligibility for support is validated by a current neuropsychological or psychoeducational assessment within the last three years and completed by a qualified professional.

1. Assessment: Testing to document a learning disability must be comprehensive. It is not acceptable to administer only one test for the purpose of diagnosis. Trained and certified/licensed psychologists, learning disability specialists and educational therapists are typically involved in the assessment process. Experience working with an adult population is essential. Minimally, domains to be addressed must include but shall not be limited to:

  1. Aptitude. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – Revised (WAIS-R) with subtest scaled scores is the preferred instrument. The Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-Revised: Tests of Cognitive Ability, or the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale: Fifth Edition, are acceptable.
  2. Achievement. Current levels of functioning in the areas of reading, mathematics, and written language are required. Acceptable instruments include the Woodcock Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery – Revised; Tests of Achievement; Stanford Test of Academic Skills (TASK); Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults; or specific achievement tests such as the Test of Written Language – 2 (TOWL-2), the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test – Revised, or the Stanford Diagnostic Mathematics Test. The Wide Range Achievement Test – Revised is not a comprehensive measure of achievement and is therefore not suitable.
  3. Information Processing. Specific areas of information processing (e.g. short- and long-term memory; sequential memory; auditory and visual perception/processing and processing speed) must be assessed. Use of subtest scaled scores from the WAIS-R or the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability are acceptable. This is not intended to be an exhaustive list or to restrict assessment in other pertinent or helpful areas such as vocational interests and aptitudes.

2. Specific Diagnoses: Comprehensive diagnostic reports must contain the name and credentials of the evaluator(s) and the date(s) of testing. The report must contain the following information:

  1. Background information on the student and the reason for referral, to include: current areas of difficulty, medical history, employment history, psychological history, interpersonal skills, educational history, family history, developmental history, academic strengths and weaknesses, and personal factors which might affect academic functioning.
  2. A statement concerning the evaluation measures that were used and a brief description of each measure.
  3. Information concerning the student’s behavior during the assessment process, including but not limited to attitude towards testing; physical appearance; attention; visual, auditory and/or motor problems; language; affect/mood; and any unusual behaviors or verbalizations.
  4. An analysis and interpretation of the results of the assessment, including both a narrative explanation and illustrative test scores.
  5. A summary of the entire assessment process which specifically addresses the concerns of the referral and includes an explicit determination of the presence of a learning disability.
  6. Recommendations that include the student’s strengths and weaknesses, in order to determine appropriate strategies to assist the student to be successful in the competitive post-secondary learning environment.

3. Recommended Accommodations: The diagnostic report should include specific recommendations for accommodations that are realistic and that the College can reasonably provide. A detailed explanation should be provided as to why each accommodation is recommended and should be correlated with specific functional limitations determined through interview, observation and/or testing. A prior history of accommodations without clear demonstration of current needs does not warrant the provision of like accommodations. The determination of reasonable accommodations for a disabled student at MECA rests with the Disability Services Coordinator working in collaboration with the individual with the disability.

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders

Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders (ADD/ADHD) requesting access must present specific additional documentation to comply with ADA and Section 504. The eligibility for support is validated by a current neuropsychological or psychoeducational assessment within the last three years and completed by a qualified professional.

1. Diagnostic Interview: Because ADD/ADHD is, by definition, first exhibited in childhood (although it may not have been formally diagnosed at that time) and manifests itself in more than one setting, relevant historical information is essential. In addition to providing detailed evidence of a childhood history of the impairment, the following areas must be investigated:

  1. A history of the individual’s presenting attentional symptoms should be provided, including evidence of ongoing impulsive/hyperactive or inattentive behaviors that significantly impair functioning in two or more settings.
  2. The individual’s developmental history.
  3.  Family history which explores the presence of ADD and other educational, learning, physical or psychological difficulties deemed relevant by the examiner.
  4. Relevant medical history, including medications and determination of the absence of a medical basis for the symptoms being evaluated.
  5. A thorough academic history of elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, including review of prior psychoeducational reports to determine whether a pattern of strengths and weaknesses is supportive of attention-based learning problems.
  6. Description of current functional limitations pertaining to an educational setting that are presumably a direct result of problems with attention.

2. Assessment: Neuropsychological or psychoeducational assessment is important in determining the current impact of the disorder in the academic setting. The evaluator should objectively review relevant testing to support the diagnosis. If grade equivalents are reported, they must be accompanied by standard scores and/or percentiles. Test scores or subtest scales should not be used as the sole measure for diagnostic profile. Checklists and/or surveys can serve to supplement the diagnostic profile but are not adequate in and of themselves for the diagnosis of ADD and do not substitute for clinical observations and sound diagnostic judgment. Data must logically reflect a substantial limitation for learning for which the individual is requesting accommodations(s).

3. Specific Diagnoses: The report must include a specific diagnosis of ADD/ADHD based on the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Use of terms such as “suggests,” “is indicative of” and “attention problems” is not acceptable. Individuals who report only problems with organization, test anxiety, memory and concentration in selective situations do not fit the prescribed diagnostic criteria for ADD/ADHD. A positive response to medication or the use of medication does not in and of itself support or negate the need for accommodations.

4. Recommended Accommodations: The diagnostic report should include specific recommendations for accommodations that are realistic and that the College can reasonably provide. A detailed explanation should be provided as to why each accommodation is recommended and should be correlated with specific functional limitations determined through interview, observation and/or testing. A prior history of accommodations without clear demonstration of current needs does not warrant the provision of like accommodations. The determination of reasonable accommodations for a disabled student at MECA rests with the Disability Services Coordinator working in collaboration with the individual with the disability.

Chronic Health/Physical Impairments including Hearing & Vision Loss/Temporary Disabilities

Students with Chronic Health Impairments requesting access must present specific additional documentation to comply with ADA and Section 504. The eligibility for support is validated by a current medical assessment within the last three years and completed by a qualified professional.

1. Assessment: The evaluation should describe the type and severity of the individual’s symptoms at the time of first diagnosis and should state the approximate date of onset. It should also describe the subsequent course of the disabling condition and specify the current treatment of the condition, detailing any currently prescribed or recommended medication, therapies, care or assistive devices. The evaluation should contain a description of the type and severity of the current symptoms and note the impact of the disability in all relevant spheres of functioning. The evaluation should address how the disability may affect the individual’s ability to function in the academic setting, e.g., reading, comprehension, memory, writing, note taking, test taking, endurance and attention. The evaluation should indicate any activities that are typically a part of an academic program that would be specifically contraindicated by the individual’s disability or disabilities.

2. Recommended Accommodations: The evaluation should include specific recommendations for accommodations that are realistic and that the College can reasonably provide. Accommodations are adjustments to the academic environment provided to ensure equal access to an enrolled student based on his or her substantial impairment of functional capacity. They are not remedial in nature, nor can they fundamentally alter the nature, nor can they fundamentally alter the nature of, or reduce the academic standards of, a course or degree program. A detailed explanation should be provided as to why each accommodation is recommended and each recommendation should be correlated with the specific functional limitations related to the disability or disabilities. A prior history of accommodations without clear demonstration of current needs does not warrant the provision of like accommodations. The determination of reasonable accommodations for a disabled student at MECA rests with the Disability Services Coordinator working in collaboration with the individual with the disability.

Psychiatric Impairments

Students with Psychiatric Impairments requesting access must present specific additional documentation to comply with ADA and Section 504. The eligibility for support is validated by a current medical and/or psychological assessment within the last three years and completed by a qualified professional.

1. Assessment: Professionals conducting evaluations and providing a diagnosis of a psychiatric disability must have training and competency in assessing the full range of psychiatric disorders. The name, title, professional credentials as well as licensing and certification information should be clearly stated in the evaluation. The following professionals are generally considered to be qualified to evaluate and diagnose psychiatric disorders: clinical psychologists, clinical social workers, psychiatrists and other relevantly trained medical doctors. The evaluation should be based on a comprehensive clinical interview and psychological testing where clinically indicated. The evaluation should include a developmental, social and family history, a relevant medical history, and a complete mental status examination that includes global assessment of current functioning. Current prescription medications should be noted, and note of any side effects which would compromise academic functioning should be included. The evaluation report must include a specific diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder based on the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria with an accompanying description of the specific symptoms that the individual presents.

2. Recommended Accommodations: An interpretive summary based on the comprehensive evaluative process is a necessary component of the documentation. This summary should include indication and discussion of the substantial limitation to learning presented by the psychiatric disorder and the degree to which this affects the individual in a learning environment. The diagnostic report should include specific recommendations for accommodations that are realistic and that the College can reasonably provide. A detailed explanation should be provided as to why each accommodation is recommended and should be correlated with specific functional limitations and the specific diagnosis indicated. A prior history of accommodations without clear demonstration of current needs does not warrant the provision of like accommodations. The determination of reasonable accommodations for a disabled student at MECA rests with the Disability Services Coordinator working in collaboration with the individual with the disability.

Grievance Procedures

Discrimination based on disability is prohibited under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and its amendments and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. The following outlines MECA’s process for resolving complaints:

  1. Contents: The grievance must be in writing; must contain the name, address, and telephone number of the student; and must include the location, date and description of the alleged discrimination. Alternative means of grieving, such as a personal interview or tape-recording, are available upon request.
  2. Filing: The student, or, if necessary because of disability, a designee, must submit the grievance to the 504/ADA Compliance Coordinator. The Director of Student Life serves as the 504/ADA compliance coordinator with the role of providing information about services and referring complainants to the appropriate office. The grievance should be submitted as soon as possible and no later than twenty (20) calendar days after the alleged violation. The Director of Student Life, Adrea Jaehnig, may be contacted at: Maine College of Art, 522 Congress Street., Portland, ME 04101; telephone 207.699.5035 or ajaehnig@meca.edu.
  3. Decision: As soon as practical after receipt of the grievance, the Director of Student Life will meet with the student to discuss the complaint. Reasonable accommodations to participate in the grievance process will be provided to the complainant upon request. As soon as practical after the meeting, the Director of Student Life will respond in a format accessible to the student (such as large print, braille or audiotape). The response will explain the position of the College and, where practical, will offer options for substantive resolution.
  4. Student Appeal to the Dean of the College: Within fifteen (15) calendar days after receiving the Officer’s decision, the student may appeal to the Dean of the College. Such an appeal should be directed to Ian Anderson, Dean of the College, Maine College of Art, 522 Congress Street., Portland, ME 04101; telephone 207.699.5036 or ianderson@meca.edu.
  5. Decision of the Dean of the College: As soon as practical after the receipt of the appeal, the Dean of the College will meet with the student to discuss the appeal. As soon as practical after the meeting, the Dean of the College will issue, in a format accessible to the student, a final decision regarding the grievance.
    Record Retention: The College will retain all documentation of grievances, appeals and responses in the above procedure for at least three (3) years.

Confidentiality

The nature of your disability, the content of your documentation and other records on file with the Disability Services Coordinator are confidential. You are free to disclose any information that you choose about your disability to faculty or others, but you are not required to disclose any information beyond what is contained in the accommodation memo.

Notification Policy

The disability services policy will be included in the Student Handbook and on the MECA website.  

Roles & Responsibilities of MECA Community Members

Students must:

  1. Self-identify and meet with the Disability Services Coordinator.
  2. Provide documentation.
  3. Discuss accommodations with faculty.
  4. Meet academic standards of courses.

Disability Services Coordinator must:

  1. Maintain the confidential records that identify students with disabilities.
  2. Evaluate the documentation and determine eligibility for accommodations.
  3. With the student, and with faculty as appropriate, determine reasonable accommodations and provide consultation and assistance as needed for their timely and effective provision.
  4. Educate faculty and institutional members on ADA policies and procedures.

Faculty must:

  1. Provide notice to students of ADA services and how they can access them via a syllabus statement.
  2. Provide approved accommodations to registered students in coordination with program chairs and the Disability Services Coordinator;
  3. Ensure that academic standards are met in compliance with ADA policies.
  4. Refer students with accommodations to the Disability Services Coordinator when issues arise involving accommodations.
  5. Serve as role models to set the tone for sensitivity and acceptance of students with disabilities.

Department Chairs must:

  1. Ensure that students are notified of ADA services and access procedures in every class in their department at the beginning of each term; and
  2. Ensure that students receive fair and respectful treatment in their departments.

The Dean of the College:

  1. Serves as the primary source of appeal in accordance with established grievance procedures.
  2. Ensures that students receive fair and respectful treatment at the institutional level.
  3. Serves as a role model to set the tone for sensitivity and acceptance of students with disabilities to faculty.
  4. Ensures that reasonable equal access has been extended to students with disabilities applying to and attending the College.

Student Information on Accommodations

Distribution of Accommodation Memo: The accommodation memo identifies the accommodations for which you are eligible. Students must request a copy of their faculty memo each semester and provide the memo to individual faculty.

Provision of Accommodations: Your instructor is notified of your initial request for accommodations through the memo that you provide. It is important that you meet with your faculty individually to discuss your needs for the course and how your accommodations will be implemented. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate with the faculty or the disability services coordinator if an accommodation is not working or needs revision. If a disagreement or conflict arises that cannot be resolved satisfactorily between you and the instructor, you must contact the Disability Services Coordinator for further assistance as soon as possible. Instructors have also been notified to contact that office in the event of questions or concerns. You must notify the faculty member of accommodations at the beginning of each semester or as soon as possible upon receipt of the accommodation memo. If you chose not to use accommodations and then decide to implement them in the middle of the semester, the accommodations are put into effect at the time of notice. Accommodations are never retroactive.

Further Requests For Accommodations: Students who experience a change in their disability and accommodations needs, must contact the Disability Services Coordinator for review. Additional documentation may be requested. If the additional accommodation is deemed reasonable, the accommodation will be added to your accommodation memo and a copy provided to you to distribute to your instructor(s). The denial of any requested accommodation by the Disability Services Coordinator can be appealed.

Use of Accommodations: You may decline to use an accommodation if you determine that the accommodation is not needed for a given course. For testing accommodations involving extended time, an alternative test location or alternative format, you should discuss with your instructor(s) how these accommodations will be implemented. Reasonable notice to the instructor is required in order to ensure timely provision of the accommodation. We recommend at least two weeks notice for testing accommodation logistics. If an approved accommodation is not being provided in a timely or effective manner, you must contact the Disability Services Coordinator as soon as possible to seek resolution.

Renewal of the Accommodations Memo: Upon student request, the accommodation memo will be provided to you for distribution to faculty on a semester-by-semester basis. You should contact the Disability Services Coordinator prior to classes beginning or the first week of classes to request a copy of your accommodation memo.. Once your request is received, your accommodation letter will be emailed to you so that you can provide a copy to your instructors.

First-Year Student Live-On Requirement & Exemptions

In an effort to provide our undergraduate students with the best experience possible and help them be academically successful, Maine College of Art has established a live-on requirement for all full-time, first-year students. We established this requirement because of the many benefits living in the residence halls provides students, especially during their first year at college.

Students first enrolling in the fall are required to live in the residence halls during the fall and spring semesters. Students first enrolling in the spring are required to live in the residence halls during the spring semester.

First-Year Student Live-On Requirement Exemptions

Students will be exempt from the live-on requirement and can choose to live on or live off campus if:

  • They will be living at home with parent(s) or legal guardian(s) and commuting to MECA. Students will need to provide written documentation from a parent or guardian,
  • They are married or have dependent(s).
  • A student is deemed medically excused by the Office of Residential Education & Housing after presenting written documentation from a qualified doctor.
  • They turn 21 years old before the first day of classes of their first enrolled semester.
  • All other requests will be handled on a case-by-case basis.

Requesting an Exemption
Students requesting an exemption from the live-on requirement, must submit a formal request in writing to the Director of Student Life and must cite specific reasons for the exemption. The Director will make a decision and the student will be notified in writing within one week of receiving the initial request.

If the student is dissatisfied with the Director’s decision, s/he can make a final appeal to the Dean of the College. This appeal must be made in writing and must be received by the Dean within one week of the Director’s decision. The Dean will provide the student written notification regarding the appeal within one week.

Mental Health Emergency Protocol and Mandated Risk Assessment Policy

MECA’s Mental Health Emergency Protocol and Mandated Risk Assessment Policy (MRA) provide guidelines for how Maine College of Art will respond when alerted that students have indicated by action, gesture, or statement that they are considering or recently have attempted suicide. This protocol is designed to ensure that interventions are handled in a personal, professional, and confidential manner. Its purpose is to assess and support students; it is not intended to be punitive.

Any member of the MECA community who learns that a student has expressed suicidal thoughts, made a suicidal threat, or attempted suicide is obligated to do the following:

Active Suicide Attempt
Call 911 immediately, and then call the MECA Emergency Phone (“red phone”): 207.228.3474.

Suicidal Ideation
If you are concerned that a student may try to commit suicide, call the MECA Emergency Phone (“red phone”): 207.228.3474.

Past Suicide Attempt or Ideation
This is not considered an emergency. Consider submitting a MECA alert, and encourage the student to connect with MECA Counseling by emailing counseling@meca.edu.

Follow-Up
Any MECA community member who has reported a suicidal incident may be directed to complete a Universal Incident Report.

The Mental Health Coordinating Team (MHCT), comprised of members from Student Life and Counseling, will evaluate the incident and make recommendations such as the following to the Vice President of Academic Affairs or, in his or her absence, another Vice President:

  • take no action at this time
  • monitor the situation, and gather collateral information
  • recommend an intervention meeting with the student
  • mandate a psychiatric evaluation
  • contact family and/or mental health provider(s)

Mandated Risk Assessment
If the MHCT determines there is sound reason for concern about the student’s well being, the student may be required to be assessed by one or more of the following:

  • MECA counseling staff
  • non-MECA mental health provider
  • a local crisis intervention service (e.g., 207.774.HELP)
  • Emergency Department at Maine Medical Center or Mercy Hospital

A student assessed by an off-campus provider must agree to submit comprehensive documentation to the MHCT. Required documentation may include the following:

  • student’s mental health status, symptoms, diagnosis
  • safety plan
  • treatment plan
  • professional opinion of whether the student poses a threat to self and/or the MECA community
  • other information if requested

Based on the mandated assessment, the MHCT will communicate to the student any required follow-up. All information obtained via a MRA will be kept confidential by the MHCT within the limits of the law.

This policy is obligatory if advised by the MHCT. Any student refusing to comply with the MRA may be subject to involuntary leave of absence and/or removal from MECA housing.

Return to Campus Following a Suicide Attempt or Mental Health Hospitalization

Within 24 hours of returning to campus after a suicide attempt, the student will be required to meet with members of the MHCT. Similarly, students returning from a mental health hospitalization may also be required to meet with the MHCT. A recently hospitalized student may be required to provide written documentation from a licensed mental health professional verifying that he or she is ready to return to a rigorous academic environment. Treatment and/or discharge plans signed by the medical clinician who provided services to the student are likely to be required.

Required Authorization to Release Information

A student required to complete a MRA will also be required to sign pertinent releases of information, enabling the MHCT to communicate with appropriate individuals, such as clinicians and parents.

Voluntary Medical Leave

MECA students are permitted to take a Voluntary Medical Leave for mental health reasons. This policy is available in the student handbook and directly from the registrar’s office.

Involuntary Leave of Absence or Removal From Campus

There may be times when it is not safe or appropriate for a student to remain at MECA. In such instances MECA has the right to require the student to take an involuntary leave of absence or be removed from campus.

Housing

MECA reserves the right to:

  • prohibit access of any individual to the residence halls
  • relocate or remove from MECA housing a student who displays behavior or ideation that is harmful, threatening, and/or endangering to the lives of others or her/his own life

Disciplinary Action

MECA does not bring disciplinary action against students for suicide attempts or suicidal ideation. However, behaviors that cause injury to self or others, cause disruption, or otherwise violate the Student Code of Responsibility are subject to disciplinary review.

Student Accounts

Billing Information

Tuition and fees are billed by semester. BFA students enrolled in 12-18 credits are considered full-time for tuition billing. BFA student enrolled 3-11 credit are considered part-time and billed on a per-credit basis. BFA students carrying in excess of 18 credits in any semester will be billed an additional amount for these credits. Student enrolled in the MAT and MFA programs are enrolled as full-time reflected on their invoice. The balance due, after deducting any financial aid or loans, must be paid approximately five (5) weeks prior to the first day of the semester. The College offers a monthly payment plan through Tuition Management Systems, Inc. Information about this plan is mailed directly to students during the summer. Any student with a student account and/or financial aid hold on their record will need to clear the hold prior to completing the registration process. For further information, please contact the Student Accounts Office.

Office of Student Accounts
Room 256, Administrative Center, 207.699.5049

Osher Loan

This program, though not actually a loan, is an advance on an anticipated credit. If a student has an anticipated credit on their student account and needs funds immediately they can use this program to get up to $500.00. Please contact the Student Accounts Office for further information.

Refund Policy and Dates

Students who withdraw from the College during a semester, drop from full- to part-time status within a semester may be granted refunds only in accordance with the College’s published policy and refund schedule. A refund is a reduction in the original tuition charged rather than a portion of the amount already paid. In order to receive a refund, the student must complete and submit a drop or exit form before the end of the refund period. This applies to part-time students and those who drop from full-time (12 credits or more) to part-time (less than 12 credits) status. The date that written notification is received determines whether or not charges will be reduced. Students receiving financial aid funds are governed by additional refund policies related to their aid; for further information, please contact the Financial Aid Office. Refund period deadlines are published in the academic calendar.

Refund Dates

  • Withdraw prior to the first day of classes 100%
  • Drop or Exit Form led by end of 1st full week of classes 75%
  • Drop or Exit Form led by end of 2nd full week of classes 40%
  • Day following 2nd full week of classes No Refund
  • End of Add/ Drop After 2nd full week of classes

Payment Negligence

No student may attend classes, acquire transcripts of grades, receive grade reports, or receive a graduation diploma until all financial obligations to Maine College of Art are fulfilled. Access to email may be interrupted during a period of non-payment.

Student Code of Responsibility

Student Code of Responsibility

It is the responsibility of each MECA student to read, understand, and comply with the following policies. These policies are established to create a safe and vibrant learning environment for all MECA students. Students are encouraged to show respect to all members of the MECA Community. Failure to comply with policies may result in judicial action.

Maine College of Art seeks to create a safe and welcoming environment in which students can achieve their goals of artistic excellence, creative expression, and the highest quality education in the visual arts. Students are responsible for following these standards both inside and outside the classroom. The Student Code of Responsibility seeks to protect the rights of free and peaceful expression in all activities. All members of the MECA community share in establishing this community of learners through mutual respect, integrity, and high ethical standards.

Students enrolled or attending any MECA program or activity shall comply with federal, state and local laws. Students should also be aware of additional policies that may apply to them including Residence Life’s Guide to Community Living and MECA Academic policies. Individuals in violation of federal, state, or local law are subject to prosecution through appropriate authorities regardless whether the activity occurs on or off campus. In addition, students may be subject to disciplinary action by MECA pursuant to this Code. The severity of sanctions imposed will be appropriate to the violation.

MECA’s Code of Student Responsibility is an administrative process based on personal responsibility and educational focus and is not a legal process.

I. Jurisdiction

  1. The MECA Student Code of Responsibility (hereinafter referred to as “Code”) shall apply to the following:
    1. Any person(s) registered, enrolled, or taking courses at MECA, either full, half, or part-time, pursuing undergraduate or graduate studies.
    2. Participants enrolled in Continuing Studies classes.
    3. Persons who withdraw after allegedly violating the Code, who are not officially enrolled for a particular term, but who have a continuing relationship with MECA or who have been notified of their acceptance for admission are considered “students” as are persons who are living in MECA residence halls, although may not be enrolled in MECA.
    4. Student organizations or those participating in student organizations.
  2. The Code may only be applied to the following premises:
    1. All land, buildings, facilities, studios, museums, residence halls, and property owned, used, controlled, and/or governed by MECA. For the purpose of jurisdiction MECA property shall extend to adjacent streets, sidewalks, and properties where MECA community members might gather which is not under the exclusive control of another individual and/or organization, or events and/or programs under the auspices of MECA.
    2. In cases in which MECA can demonstrate a clear and distinct interest as an academic institution regardless of where Code occurs and which seriously threatens any educational process and/or the health and safety of any member of the MECA community.
    3. Violations of local, state, and/or federal laws.

II. Definitions

  1. The term “College” or the acronym “MECA” herein references Maine College of Art.
  2. The Dean of the College is the person responsible for the oversight of the Code. The Dean of the College designates the Department of Student Life to administer the Code.
  3. The term “MECA official” includes any person employed by the College, performing assigned administrative or professional responsibilities.
  4. The term “MECA community” includes students, faculty, staff, visitors, and those engaging in activities on MECA property.
  5. The term “Student Code Administrator” refers to the Student Life professional authorized by the Dean of the College to investigate alleged violations and to impose sanctions upon any person(s) found to have violated the Code. The Student Life professional may designate a “Student Code Hearing Officer” to serve in his/her place. The Student Llife professional is authorized as the Student Code Administrator to impose sanctions in all cases.
  6. The term “Student Code Hearing” means an investigation and hearing by the Student Code Administrator, Student Code Hearing Officer, or “Student Code Hearing Board” appointed by the Student Life professional to hear alleged violations and impose sanctions, if necessary.
  7. The term “Student Code Appellate Board” means an appeals board consisting of the Assistant Dean, chairperson, one faculty member, one student, and a Student Affairs professional as an ex officio member to determine whether a student has the right to an appeal and rehearing.
  8. The term “policy” means the written regulations of the College as found in, but not limited to, the Code, Residential Education Guide to Community Living, the College web page and computer use policy, and undergraduate, graduate, Continuing Studies, and/or Art Education Catalogs.
  9. The term “Complainant” means any person who submits a charge alleging that a student violated this Code. When a student believes that s/he has been a victim of another student’s misconduct, the student who believes s/he has been a victim will have the same rights under this Code as are provided to the Complainant, even if another member of the College community submitted the charge him/herself.
  10. The term “Accused Student” means any student accused of violating this Code.

III. Student Responsibility Code Authority

  1. Composition of Boards. The Student Code Administrator shall determine the composition of Code Hearings and determine whether the Student Code Administrator, Student Code Hearing Officer, or Student Code Hearing Board shall be authorized to hear the Code violation case.
  2. Policy Development. The Student Code Administrator shall develop policies for the administration of the Code and procedural rules for the Code proceedings.
  3. Decisions. Decisions made by a Student Code Administrator or Student Code Hearing Board shall be final, pending the appeal process.

IV. Violations
Those activities, which directly and significantly interfere with MECA’s endeavors to create an environment in which students can achieve their goals of artistic excellence, creative expression, and the highest quality education in the visual arts and/or which seriously threatens any educational process and/or the health and safety of any member of the MECA community. Students are required to engage in responsible social Code that reflects credit upon the MECA community and to model good citizenship in the arts and global community.

  1. The violations below are considered in the context of the student’s responsibility as a member of the MECA community. Other actions may be considered violations based upon various documents such as Residence Hall contract, policies, and procedures. Disciplinary action under this Code is an independent process of awarding grades and the Code cannot be used to change awarded grades unless a violation of Academic Integrity has occurred listed but not limited to subsection (i) listed below.
  2.  The following violations indicate categories of Code or activity that violates the Code. The list below gives reasonable warning to students that such Code is forbidden. These violations, rules, and regulations are not to be rigidly constructed and is not an exhaustive list of violations. Any student found to have committed or to have attempted to commit the following misconducts is subject to the disciplinary sanctions outlined in Section VIII.

i. Academic Integrity
Acts of dishonesty including but not limited to cheating, plagiarism, fabrication, stealing, copying, and academic dishonesty as defined in a course syllabus. Cheating is defined as and includes, but is not limited to: (1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations; (2) use of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; (3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the College faculty or staff; (4) engaging in any behavior specifically prohibited by a faculty member in the course syllabus or class discussion. Plagiarism is defined as and includes but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment including art projects/work. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials.

ii. Abuse
Physical abuse, verbal abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, coercion, and/or other conduct, which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person including oneself.

iii. Alcohol and Drugs
Use, possession, manufacturing, or distribution of alcoholic beverages (except as expressly permitted by MECA regulations), or public intoxication. Alcoholic beverages may not, in any circumstance, be used by, possessed by or distributed to any person under twenty-one (21) years of age. Use, possession, manufacturing, or distribution of any controlled substance and or prescription drugs except as expressly permitted by law. See also full College policy on Alcohol and Drugs.

iv. Code Abuse
Abuse of the Code system, including but not limited to: (1) failure to obey the notice from a Student Code Administrator, Student Code Hearing Officer, Student Code Hearing Board or Appellate Board to appear for a meeting or hearing as part of the Code System; (2) falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a Code administrator or board; (3) disruption or interference with the orderly Conduct of a Code hearing or Appellate Board proceeding; (4) institution of a Code proceeding in bad faith; (5) attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the Code system; (6) attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a Code Hearing or Appellate Board prior to, and/or during the course of, the Code proceedings; (7) harassment (verbal or physical) and/or intimidation of a member of a Code hearing or appellate board prior to, during, and/or after Code proceedings; (8) failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the Code; and (9) influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit a violation of the Code.

v. Convicted of Crimes
Conviction of a crime that threatens any educational process and/or health and safety of the MECA community.

vi. Cyber
Participating in or posting of materials on another person’s site that violates the MECA Student Code of Responsibility.

vii. Defamation of Character
Slander or libel actions of a student.

viii. Demonstrations
Participating in an on-campus or off-campus demonstration, riot or activity that disrupts the normal operations of College and/or infringes on the rights of other members of the College community; leading or inciting others to disrupt scheduled and/or normal activities within any campus building or area. Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on College premises or at College sponsored or supervised functions.

ix. Disorderly Conduct
Conduct that is disorderly, lewd, or indecent; breach of peace; or aiding, abetting, or procuring another person to breach the peace (i.e. fighting) on College premises or at functions sponsored by, or participated in by, the College or members of the academic community. Disorderly conduct includes but is not limited to: any unauthorized use of electronic or other devices to make any media recording of any person while on College premises without his/her prior knowledge, or without his/her effective consent when such a recording is likely to cause injury or distress. This includes, but is not limited to, surreptitiously taking pictures of another person in a private studio, residence hall room, and/or restroom.

x. Disruption
Disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings, other MECA activities, including its public service functions on or off campus, or of other authorized non-MECA activities when the conduct occurs on MECA premises.

xi. Endanger
Behavior or activities that endanger the safety of oneself or others. This includes, but is not limited to, self-destructive behavior.

xii. False Documents
Forgery, alteration, tampering, or misuse of any MECA document, record, or instrument of identification.

xiii. Firearms
Illegal or unauthorized possession of firearms, explosives, other weapons, or dangerous chemicals on MECA premises or use of any such item(s) even if legally possessed, in a manner that harms, threatens or causes fear to others.

xiv. Harassment and Discrimination
Harassment and discrimination based on color, race, creed, religion, gender, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, disability, or veteran status.

xv. Hazing
Hazing is an act that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student, or that destroys or removes public or private property, for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization. The express or implied consent of the victim will not be a defense. Apathy or acquiescence in the presence of hazing are not neutral acts; they are violations of this rule.

xvi. Hate Crimes and Bias Incidents
Acts that threaten and/or target a selective group of people (i.e. sexual orientation, race, color, gender, religion, etc.)

xvii. Identification
Failure to identify one’s self and/or comply with directions of MECA officials or law enforcement officers acting in performance of their duties and/or failure to identify oneself to these persons when requested to do so. Furnishing false information to any MECA official including administrator, faculty, and/or staff members. Furnishing false information to committees in course of disciplinary proceeding, and/or knowingly allowing false information to be supplied is considered an act of dishonesty.

xviii. Keys and Cards
Unauthorized possession, duplication or use of keys, cards or FOBs. This includes, but is not limited to, unauthorized entry to MECA premises.

xix. Property
Attempted or actual theft of and/or damage to MECA property, property of a member of the MECA community, and/or other personal or public property, on or off campus.

xx. Safety Equipment
Tampering, disarming, or causing malfunction of fire and safety equipment, alarm systems, and/or cameras.

xxi. Sanctions Compliance
Failure to comply with or attempts to evade any sanction imposed by a College official, the Judicial Board, Dean’s Hearing Board, or Appeals Board.

xxii. Sexual Misconduct
Any sexual act or attempt to engage in any sexual act with another person without the consent of that person or, in circumstances in which the person is unable, due to age, coercion, disability, altered mental state or unconsciousness, or chemical or other impairment, to give consent. This includes but not limited to sexual assault, rape, harassment, and intimate touching without consent. Also see full College Sexual Misconduct and Anti-Discrimination Policy.

xxiii. Student Identification
The misuse of MECA ID card including Café usage.

xxiv. Technology
Theft or other abuse of computer facilities and resources, including but not limited to:

  • Unauthorized entry into a file, to use, read, or change the contents, or for any other purpose
  • Unauthorized transfer of a file
  • Use of another individual’s identification and/or password
  • Use of computing facilities and resources to interfere with the work of another student, faculty member or College Official
  • Use of computing facilities and resources to send obscene or abusive messages
  • Use of computing facilities and resources to interfere with normal operation of the MECA computing system
  • Use of computing facilities and resources in violation of copyright laws
  • Any violation of MECA’s computer usage policies.

See full College policy on Technology Electronic Communications Policy.

xxv. Theft
The unlawful seizing of another person’s property.

xxvi. Trespassing
Trespassing or unauthorized presence/usage on/of MECA property including residence halls.

xxvii. Vandalism
Destruction or alteration of a public or private property through the use of any materials.

xxviii. Violations
Violation of any MECA policy, rule, or regulation published in hard copy or available electronically on MECA’s website.

V. Legal Process and MECA Conduct

  1. MECA’s disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a student charged with Conduct that potentially violates both the criminal law and this Conduct (that is, if both possible violations result from the same factual situation) without regard to the pendency of civil or criminal litigation in court or criminal arrest and prosecution. Proceedings under this Code may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off campus at the discretion of the Student Code Administrator. Determinations made or sanctions imposed under this Code shall not be subject to change because criminal charges arising out of the same facts giving rise to violation of MECA rules were dismissed, reduced, or resolved in favor of or against the criminal law defendant.
  2. When a student is charged by federal, state, or local authorities with a violation of law, the College will not request or agree to special consideration for that individual because of his or her status as a student. If the alleged offense is also being processed under the Code, the College may advise off-campus authorities of the existence of the Code and of how such matters are typically handled within the MECA community. The College will attempt to cooperate with law enforcement and other agencies in the enforcement of criminal law on campus and in the conditions imposed by criminal courts for the rehabilitation of student violators (provided that the conditions do not conflict with campus rules or sanctions). Individual students and other members of the MECA community, acting in their personal capacities, remain free to interact with governmental representatives as they deem appropriate.

VI. Code Procedures:

  1. Any member of the MECA community may levy charges against a student for violations of the Code. A charge shall be prepared in writing detailing the alleged Code violation and directed to the Department of Student Affairs (Student Code Administrators). Any charges must be submitted no longer than thirty (30) days after the incident or knowledge of the incident.
  2. The Student Code Administrator or designee will investigate to determine if the alleged violations have merit. If the alleged violations have merit, the Administrator may implement administrative sanctions. If sanctions are not accepted by the Complainant or Accused, the Administrator will either investigate the alleged violations, designate to the Officer, or call a Student Code Hearing Board to investigate the allegations based on the Code Hearing process found in Section VII.
  3. All charges shall be presented to the Accused Student in written form. A time shall be set for a Student Code Hearing, not less than one nor more than ten calendar days after the student has been notified that there is merit to the case. Maximum time limits for scheduling a Student Code Hearing may be extended at the discretion of the Student Code Administrator.

VII. Student Code Hearing
A. Student Code Hearing shall be conducted by the Student Code Administrator, Officer, as the individual hearing officer, or a Student Code Hearing Board in which the Student Code Administrator shall serve as chair, according to the following guidelines:

  1. Student Code Hearings shall be conducted in private.
  2. The Complainant, Accused Student and their advisors, if any, shall be allowed to attend the entire portion of the Student Code Hearing at which information is received (excluding deliberations). Admission of any other person to the Code Hearing shall be at the discretion of the Student Code Administrator.
  3. In Code Hearings involving more than one Accused Student, the Student Code Administrator or Student Code Hearing Officer, at his or her discretion, may permit the Code Hearings concerning each student to be conducted either separately or jointly.
  4. The Complainant and the Accused Student have the right to be assisted by an advisor they choose, at their own expense. The advisor must be a member of the MECA community and may not be an attorney and/or parent(s) or guardian(s). The Complainant and the Accused Student is responsible for presenting his or her own information, and therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any Code Hearing before the Student Code Administrator, Student Code Hearing Officer, or Student Code Hearing Board. A student should select as an advisor a person whose schedule allows attendance at the scheduled date and time for the Code Hearing because delays will not be allowed due to the scheduling conflicts of an advisor unless deemed an emergency by the Student Code Administrator.
  5. The Complainant, the Accused Student, and the Student Code Administrator, Student Code Hearing Officer, or Student Code Hearing Board may arrange for witnesses to present pertinent information to the Student Code Administrator, Student Code Hearing Officer, or Student Code Hearing Board.
  6. Witnesses will provide information to and answer questions from the Student Code Administrator or Student Code Hearing Officer. The Accused Student and/or Complainant may suggest questions for answer by each other or by other witnesses either verbally or prior to in writing. All questions and answers will be directed at the Student Code Administrator or Student Code Hearing Officer rather than to the witness(es) directly. This method is used to preserve the educational tone of the hearing and to avoid creation of an adversarial environment. Questions of whether potential information will be received shall be resolved at the discretion of the Student Code Administrator or Student Code Hearing Officer.
    vii. Pertinent records, exhibits, and written statements may be accepted as information for consideration by a Student Code Administrator, Student Code Hearing Officer, or Student Code Hearing Board at the discretion of the Student Code Administrator (chairperson). The Student Code Administrator shall keep permanent records of all hearings.
    viii. If an Accused Student, with notice, does not appear before a Code Hearing, the information in support of the charges shall be presented and considered even if the Accused Student is not present.
  7. All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the Student Code Administrator.
  8. After the portion of the Code Hearing concludes in which all pertinent information has been received, the Student Code Administrator, Student Code Hearing Officer, or Student Code Hearing Board shall deliberate in a closed session to review presented information and shall determine whether the Accused Student has violated each section of the Code, which the student is charged with violating. Accused Students found in violation of the Code shall be sanctioned by the Student Code Administrator as found in Section VIII.
  9. The standard of determination shall be a preponderance — that is, made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not that the Accused Student violated the Code.
  10. Formal rules of process, procedure, and/or technical rules of evidence, such as those applied in criminal or civil court, are not used in Code proceedings.
  11. There shall be a single verbatim record, such as a tape recording, of all Code Hearings before the Student Code Administrator, Student Code Hearing Officer, or Student Code Hearing Board (not including deliberations). Deliberations shall not be recorded. The record shall be the property of the College. The tape recording or other verbatim record of the hearing will be an educational record under FERPA that a student with FERPA access rights would be allowed to review but not to copy.
  12. The Student Code Administrator or Student Code Hearing Officer may accommodate concerns for the personal safety, well-being, and/or fears of confrontation of the Complainant, Accused Student, and/or other witness during the hearing by providing separate facilities, by using a visual screen, and/or by permitting participation by telephone, video conferencing, videotape, audio tape, written statement, or other means, where and as determined in the sole judgment of Student Code Administrator or Student Code Hearing Officer.

VIII. Sanctions

A. The following sanctions or multiple sanctions may be imposed upon any student found to have violated the Student Code of Responsibility:

  1. Warning is a notice (provided in writing) to the student that the student has violated institutional regulations either intentionally or unintentionally.
  2. Probation is a written reprimand. Probation is for a designated period of time and includes the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to violate any institutional regulation(s) during the probationary period.
  3. Loss of Privileges is the denial of specified privileges for a designated period of time.
  4. Restorative Justice is a holistic approach to sanctions. Restorative sanctions may include conferences, discussions, apologies, restitution, and self-evaluation.
  5. Restitution is required compensation for loss, damage, or injury. This may take the form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement. Any restitution amount will be communicated in writing to the Student Accounts (Billing Office) and the amount of restitution owed will be treated as any other outstanding balance, with the student being subject to any penalty the College would typically impose in the event of non-payment including non-course registration.
  6. Discretionary Sanctions: The Student Code Administrator has the right to impose additional discretionary sanctions as he/she sees fit, including, but not limited to, work assignments, essays, service to the College, or other related discretionary assignments.
  7. Residence Hall Suspension is the separation of the student from the residence halls for a definite period of time, after which the student is eligible to return. Conditions for readmission may be specified.
  8. Residence Hall Expulsion is the permanent separation of the student from the residence halls. The timeframe for vacating the residence hall, unless otherwise indicated by the Student Code Administrator, is specified in the Office of Residential Education & Housing Guide to Community Living.
  9. College Suspension is the separation of the student from the College for a definite period of time of not less than one semester nor more than four semesters, after which the student is eligible to return. Conditions for readmission may be specified.
  10. College Expulsion is the permanent separation of the student from the College.ES
  11. Revocation of Admission and/or Degree: Admission to the College or a degree awarded from the College may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation, or other violation of College standards in obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by a student prior to graduation.
  12. Withholding Degree: The College may withhold awarding a degree otherwise earned until the completion of the process set forth in this Code, including the completion of all sanctions imposed, if any.

B. Other than MECA expulsion or revocation or withholding of a degree, disciplinary sanctions shall not be made part of the student’s permanent academic record, but shall become part of the student’s disciplinary record held in the Department of Student Affairs. Upon graduation, the student’s disciplinary record may be expunged of disciplinary actions other than residence hall expulsion, College suspension, expulsion, or revocation or withholding of a degree, upon application to Dean of the College. Cases involving the imposition of sanctions other than residence hall expulsion, MECA suspension, College expulsion or revocation or withholding of a degree shall be expunged from the student’s confidential record three years after initial disposition of the case.

C. In situations involving both an Accused Student(s) and a student(s) claiming to be the victim of another student’s conduct, the records of the process and of the sanctions imposed, if any, may be considered to be the education records of both the Accused Student(s) and the student(s) claiming to be the victim because the educational career and chances of success in the academic community of each may be impacted.

D. In each case in which a Student Code Hearing Officer or Student Code Hearing Board determines that a student has violated the Code, the sanction(s) shall be determined and imposed by the Student Code Administrator. In cases in which persons other than Student Code Administrator have been authorized to serve as the Student Code Hearing Officer or Student Code Hearing Board, the recommendation of that person(s) shall be considered by the Student Code Administrator in determining and imposing sanctions. The Student Code Administrator is not limited to sanctions recommended by those persons hearing the cases. Following the Code Hearing, the Student Code Administrator shall advise the Accused Student, (and a complaining student who believes s/he was the victim of another student’s conduct) in writing of its determination and of the sanction(s) imposed, if any.

E. Interim Suspension

  1. In certain circumstances, the Dean, Student Life professional, or other designee, may impose a MECA or residence hall suspension prior to the Student Code Board Hearing before a Student Code Board.
  2. Interim suspension may be imposed only:
    1. To ensure the safety and well-being of members of the College community or preservation of College property
    2. To ensure the student’s own physical or emotional safety and well-being
    3. If the student poses an ongoing threat of disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of MECA.
  3. During the interim suspension, a student shall be denied access to the residence halls and/or to the campus (including courses) and/or all other College activities or privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible, as the Dean or Student Code Administrator may determine to be appropriate.
  4. In the case of an interim suspension, the student shall be notified in writing of the action and the reasons for the interim suspension. This notification will also specify the time, date, and location of the Code Hearing.
  5. The interim suspension does not replace the regular process, which shall proceed on the normal schedule, up to and through a Code Hearing, if required.

IX. Appeals
A. A decision reached by the Student Code Administrator or a sanction imposed by the Student Code Administrator may be appealed by the Accused Student(s) or Complainant(s) to a Student Code Appellate Hearing Board within five (5) business days of the decision. Such appeals shall be in writing and shall be delivered to the Department of Student Life. The appeal is then delivered to the Appellate Board.

B. The Student Code Appellate Hearing Board shall be comprised of the Dean, and/or the addition of one faculty member, one student member, and a Student Life professional.

C. The Dean shall call the Student Code Appellate Hearing Board to hear the appeal or render a decision on the appeal based on the purposes found in Section IX:d.

D. Except as required to explain the basis of new information, an appeal shall be limited to a review of the verbatim record of the Student Code Administrator and supporting documents for one or more of the following purposes:

  1. To determine whether the Code Hearing was conducted fairly in light of the charges and information presented, and in conformity with prescribed procedures giving the complaining and accused party a reasonable opportunity to prepare and to present information that the Code was violated and/or prepare a response. Deviations from designated procedures will not be a basis for sustaining an appeal unless significant prejudice results.
  2. To determine whether the decision reached regarding the Accused Student was based on substantial information, that is, whether there were facts in the case that, if believed by the fact finder, were more likely than not established that a violation of the Code occurred.
  3. To determine whether the sanction(s) imposed were appropriate for the violation of the Code that the student was found to have committed.
  4. To consider new information, sufficient to alter a decision or other relevant facts not brought forth in the original hearing, because such information and/or facts were not known to the person appealing at the time of the original Code Hearing.
  5. After reviewing the case, the Student Code Hearing Appellate Board, may: (1) affirm the decision of the Student Code Administrator, or (2) ask the Student Code Administrator to reinvestigate the case; (3) amend the sanctions of the Student Code Administrator; and/or (4) take appropriate action as they deem necessary based on the individual case within the Code policies.
  6. If the Student Code Hearing Appellate Board affirms the decision of the Student Code Administrator, the matter shall be considered final and binding upon all involved.

X. FERPA
A. MECA reserves the right to contact parent(s) and/or guardian(s) based on the severity of any Code violation.
B. MECA does not need the signed consent of a student to contact parent(s) and/or guardian(s) based on the severity of any Code violation.
C. MECA administrators may access a file with the written consent of Student Life.

XI. Interpretation and Revision
A. Any question of interpretation or application of the Student Code of Responsibility shall be referred to Student Life and/or designee for final determination.
B. The Student Code of Responsibility shall be reviewed yearly under the direction of the Student Code Administrator.

General College Policies

Alcohol & Other Drugs Policy

Philosophy
The goal of the MECA Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy is to establish and maintain a healthy and safe campus environment free from the detrimental effects of drug and alcohol abuse. Maine College of Art complies fully with local, state and federal laws regarding the sale, possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages. The unlawful use, possession, manufacturing, or distribution of any controlled substance and/or prescription drug(s) is strictly prohibited. MECA recognizes that alcohol and substance abuse is a complex public health concern. The College provides educational programs regarding the health risks associated with alcohol and drug abuse and provides support and resources for students and employees seeking counseling and treatment. All students, faculty, staff, and guests are responsible for their behavior regarding this policy.

Health Risks Associated with Alcohol & Drug Abuse
Members of the MECA community should understand that any substance used immoderately will result in negative consequences for the user. Misuse of alcohol or other drugs can result in psychological and physical dependence and can lead to physical consequences, such as suppression of immune response, organ damage, and learning and memory problems. It can also result in death. A list of local and national substance abuse resources may be found at the end of this document.

Alcohol & Drug Awareness and Education
Educational awareness programming regarding alcohol and other drugs is provided for new students each year during orientation. In addition, education programs and resources are organized by Student Life, Residence Life, and Counseling & Wellness throughout the year. The College distributes the Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy, resources, and information about Maine State Laws via email to all students, faculty and staff annually in early October.

Local, State, and Federal Alcohol & Drug Laws
All students and employees should be familiar with all laws pertaining to the sale, consumption and possession of alcoholic beverages. More information about Federal and Maine State laws can be found at http://alcoholpolicy.niaaa.nih.gov/UnderageDrinking.html or http://www.maine.gov/dafs/bablo/statutes_rules/liquor.htm.

College Policy on Alcohol and Illegal Drugs
The sale, possession and use of alcohol on campus must comply with all laws and MECA policies. Acquisition, possession, transportation, and consumption of alcohol by anyone under 21 years of age are strictly prohibited by the College.

Alcohol may not be possessed or consumed by students, faculty, staff and visitors regardless of age in the Porteous Building or in Oak or Shepley Residence Halls. Students who are 21 years of age or older living in Miles Standish may possess and consume wine or beer (limited to one bottle of wine or a six-pack of beer) in the privacy of their apartments provided that all residents of that apartment are 21 years of age or older.

Exceptions to this policy for special events require prior authorization of the appropriate Vice President, the Executive Vice-President, the Director of Facilities (related to room set-up and capacity), the Director of Student Life (while classes are in session or if students are attending), and the Café Manager (if Sodexo is staffing event). Proper licenses or permits must be obtained as needed. Only those students, faculty, staff, and visitors over the age of 21 may participate in the consumption of alcohol at officially sanctioned and catered events and/or programs. Departments interested in hosting an event with alcohol must submit catering request to serve alcohol at least 30 days via the Catering Request Form. The request will be shared with the above staff. If approved, a plan will be determined about how alcohol will be served in compliance with local and federal laws and what staffing and security is necessary.

All members of the College and their guests who are of legal drinking age are urged to limit their consumption of alcoholic beverages to one drink (5 ounces of wine, 1.5 ounces of hard liquor, or 12 ounces of beer) per hour to decrease the chances of intoxication. Members of the College are responsible for their behavior while drinking and should understand that being under the influence of alcohol does not lessen accountability to the college community. Whenever alcohol is served, there must be a variety of non-alcoholic beverages and food available in sufficient quantities to last for an entire event. Coerced or forced consumption of alcohol or other drugs is strictly prohibited. Engaging in such behavior or failing to take direct action to stop such behavior (personally intervening or alerting authorities) will result in immediate sanctions including suspension/dismissal for the responsible individual(s). Marketing of on-campus or off-campus events will not encourage alcohol misuse or place emphasis on the quantity or frequency of use. Only the philosophy of safe, responsible and legal use of alcohol may be represented on campus.

Illegal Drugs
All students and their guests are required to adhere to federal, state, local and College policies regarding illegal drugs. Possession of illegal drugs in any campus facility or at any college-sponsored activity is strictly prohibited. Students who violate the drug policy and/or state and federal laws will be subject to the Code of Student Responsibility and/or state or federal criminal justice procedures. The following is a partial list of behaviors prohibited by this policy. It is intended to serve as a guide to appropriate behavior and is not an exhaustive list.

  • Possession and/or use of illegal drugs or illegal drug paraphernalia;
  • Possession of a more-than-therapeutic quantity of either prescription or over-the-counter medications;
  • Possession and/or use of another person’s prescription medicine;
  • Exhibiting signs of being under the influence of illegal drugs (such as altered mental state, vomiting, agitation, etc.);
  • Sale, service, provision or production of illegal drugs or prescription medicine with any person;
  • Supporting the violation of the drug policy (being present in a room/space or providing a room/space where a drug violation is taking place);
  • The use or possession of marijuana*, THC, bath salts, spice or salvia.

* Medical marijuana is considered an illegal drug by the Federal Government and therefore cannot be used on campus. While local or state laws may allow for the use of medical marijuana for registered users, institutions of higher education must follow federal laws in order to comply with federal student aid regulations.

Sanctions
Students who violate local, state, or federal law or College policy, will be subject to the Code of Student Responsibility and or state or federal criminal justice procedures. The severity of sanctions imposed will be appropriate to the violation. Sanctions may include but are not limited to: warning, probation, educational sanctions, suspension, expulsion, withholding of degree, or revocation of admission or degree.

Resources: Where can I go for help for substance abuse?

Initial Resources for Assistance and Referrals

  • MECA Counseling & Wellness: counseling@meca.edu
  • MECA Director of Student Life: 207.699.5035
  • MECA Executive Vice President: 207.699.5045
  • Cumberland County Opportunity Alliance Crisis Response (24-hour hotline) 207.774.HELP (4357)
  • National Treatment and Referral Line: 1.800.662.HELP

Portland area resources for substance abuse prevention and treatment

AA
47 Portland Street
24-hour hotline: 800.737.6237 or 207.774.4355
SMCC meeting: 8-9 Wednesdays, room 109 Jewett Hall

AL-ANON
(207) 284-1844
Al-Anon is a fellowship of those who are affected by another’s drinking who come together to share their experience, strength, and hope in order to solve their common problems. Its stated purpose is to help families and friends of alcoholics. To find a meeting:

Crossroads for Women (Scarborough)
24/7 helpline for addiction issues and resources (for men and women): 866.349.0141
Offers an IOP (intensive outpatient treatment program) for women, 1:1 counseling for men and women, women’s residential program

Maine Medical Community and Outpatient Services
844.292.0111 or Info_Recovery@MaineBehavioralHealthcare.org
Outpatient therapy and a range of community and home-based treatment services for children, adults, and families who may be experiencing life stressors, transitions or other behavioral health issues.

McGeachey Hall at Maine Medical Center
207.662.2211
Offers outpatient treatment and partial hospitalization programs

Mercy Hospital
144 State Street
207.879.3600
Offers outpatient partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient (IOP) treatment

Narcotics Anonymous (NA)
800.974.0062

Portland Recovery Community Center (PRCC)
Offers information and groups
468 Forest Avenue
207.553.2575

Maine College of Art Diversity Statement + Compact

Maine College of Art Educates Artists for Life.

To give further definition and distinction to Maine College of Art’s institutional mission and to advance the goal of diversity in the strategic plan, the following set of principles were created to strengthen our learning community and cultivate an environment that prepares its students to thrive in a diverse and global world. Maine College of Art recognizes that diversity is integral to the academic experience and strives to foster an inclusive culture defined by respect, equity and social responsibility. These principles serve as another catalyst for MECA students, faculty, staff and trustees to become the critically engaged citizens upon whom our world depends.

We understand the differences and diversity of our experiences include, but are not limited to, race, class, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, national origin, ethnicity, faith, religion, veteran status, mental and physical ability.

I am responsible as a member of the MECA community:

  1. For recognizing, validating and thinking critically about the diversity of experience within our community.
  2. To move beyond cultural stereotypes and assumptions in order to open up an authentic (and inclusive) culture of critique.
  3. To embrace the principles of a small caring community that supports the authentic expression of self and others.
  4. To see beyond assumptions in order to build authentic relationships across differences.
  5. To learn and be aware of how larger cultural inequalities and inequities influence our daily interactions.
  6. To participate with willingness and openness in opportunities which address current social events and to think critically about the impact on our college community and larger world.
  7. For respecting and supporting all members of our community.
  8. For engaging in action and dialogue when there is injustice driven by privilege and oppression.

Emergency Reporting on Campus

Emergency Reporting on Campus

Emergencies on campus may be broken down into two categories: those involving accidental injury to a person or property and those involving crimes on campus. The following information will help you figure out what to do next. For more details about studio safety procedures, please refer to the College’s Facilities Management Studio Guide in the appendix.

Emergency Telephone Numbers

  • Emergency: 911
  • Porteous Front Desk: 207.775.3052
  • Portland Police Department Non Emergency: 207.874.8479
  • Student Life Staff On-call (24/7): 207.228.3474

How to Report an Accident on Campus
When someone is injured on campus the first thing to do is to get the necessary medical attention. Dialing 911 will connect you emergency professionals. Otherwise, all accidental injuries and other emergencies must be reported immediately to your instructor, classroom technician, a member of Student Life staff, or another College of official.

First Aid Kits are located on each floor of the Porteous building. Familiarize yourself with the locations in your area before an accident occurs. Report any empty kits to an instructor or technician. Eyewash and deluge showers are located in appropriate studio areas. Chemicals in the eyes or on the skin require a minimum of a 15-minute rinse with an eyewash or shower, followed immediately by emergency medical attention by a doctor or nurse. All emergencies/injuries must be reported as soon as possible to a member of Student Life in person or via the Universal Incident Form.

When Reporting an Emergency

  • Give exact location of emergency (building address, room number, etc.).
  • Give your name and phone number from where you are calling.
  • Describe nature of emergency (fire, leak, spill, injury).
  • Stay near phone, if possible, for additional instructions.

The Clery Act Reporting

The following policies are provided as part of the Maine College of Art’s commitment to the safety and security of the MECA community and are in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistic Act, enacted in October 1998.

MECA is firmly committed to providing honest, accurate, and timely reporting of all crime statistics. All data and statistics used for this document are gathered from the MECA Department of Student Life records, which contain reports of all incidents and crimes reported by personnel and members of the MECA Community, Code Officer, Portland Police Department, and anonymous sources.

Confidential Reporting Procedures

If you are the victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action within the MECA judicial system or the criminal justice system, you may still want to consider making a confidential report. With your permission, the Student Life staff can file a report on the details of the incident without revealing your identity. The purpose of a confidential report is to help take steps to ensure the future safety of you and others. With such information, the College can keep an accurate records of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports led in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crimes statistics for the institution.

Disciplinary Sanctions for Any Sex Offense or Sexual Assault

Any person found to have committed any sex offense or sexual assault by Maine College of Art’s Hearing Committee and/or the Maine Criminal Justice System will be subject to severe disciplinary sanctions to include immediate suspension or dismissal.

MECA Alert

MECA Alert is a centralized referral system which captures student concerns and incident reports. The information provided enables us to help students who may be experiencing academic or personal difficulties. Referrals helps us to intervene early on behalf of a student to help him/her be successful at MECA.

Notification of Options for Changing Living Areas or Academic Situations

Any victim(s) of any incident(s), including assaults, sex offenses or sexual assaults have the right to request a change in living areas or academic situations. If an immediate threat is perceived by a person, they can be reassigned a different room or building until the threat is removed or eliminated.

Policy Statement Addressing the Reporting of Criminal Offenses

To report a crime: Contact 911 (for emergencies only) or Portland Police Department at 207.874.8479.

Any suspicious activity or person seen in parking lots or loitering around motor vehicles, inside the residence hall, art galleries, inside buildings, or around College premises should be reported to Portland Police Department at 207.874.8479.

To report a crime at MECA, call the Institutional Emergency Phone at 207.228.3474.

In addition, you may report a crime and/or incident to the following campus personnel:

  • Don Tuski, President
  • Beth Elicker, Executive Vice President
  • Ian Anderson, Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College
  • Beckie Conrad, Vice President for Institutional Advancement
  • Adrea Jaehnig, Director of Student Life
  • Leeanna Morris, Assistant Director of Student Life
  • Donna Wermenchuk, Payroll and Human Resources Coordinator
  • Doug Doering, Director of Facilities Management

Each department augments with the other within their jurisdictions during mutual investigations, arrest, and prosecutions.

Procedures Victims Should Follow Should an Offense Occur
Any victims of any incidents, including assaults, sex offenses or sex assaults should immediately contact the Portland Police Department, which will immediately respond to assist the victims in getting medical attention, then investigate the crime. At all times, the victim’s rights will be protected and the victim will have input into the course of the investigation. Counseling services will be provided if the victim is receptive to such services.

Reporting of Criminal Activities or Emergencies
Community members, students, faculty, staff, and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety related incidents to the Portland Police Department, Facilities Department, Student Life, faculty and/or staff in a timely manner. To report a crime, non- emergency, security or public safety related matter on campus call 207.775.3052 . To report an emergency dial 911. To report a crime off-campus call the Portland Police Department at 207.874.8479 or 911.

Dispatchers are available at the Portland Police Department 24 hours a day to answer your call. All security incident reports involving residential students and/or off campus students are forwarded to the Student Life Staff Member on call for review. If a sexual assault or rape should occur, staff on the scene, including Portland Police, will offer the victim a wide variety of services. Sexual Assault Response Services in Portland are available by dialing 207.774.3613 or 1.800.313.9900.

The information about “resources” is not provided to infer that those resources are “reporting entities” for MECA. Crimes should be reported to the Student Life Staff to ensure inclusion in the annual crime statistics and to aid in providing timely warning notices to the community, when appropriate. For example, a crime that was reported only to the Sexual Assault Response Services would not be included in the MECA crime statistics.

Exhibition Installation Policies – Porteous Building

Exhibition Installation Policies

Installation Policies:

  • Artwork must be displayed in the designated zones only. To reserve a zone, sign out a space in the binder located outside the ICA.
  • Please seek assistance from the Exhibition Coordinator or Facilities staff for any installations that may be difficult to install, hazardous, or potentially damaging to the building.
  • Artwork that may be controversial, offensive or inappropriate for younger audiences must be discussed, prior to installation, with the Exhibition Coordinator. The Lower Level, Floors 1 & 2 are accessible to the public and require. Work of this nature may be relocated to an area viewable only to the MECA community.
  • Artwork may not be fastened to the flooring in any way.
  • Painting, drawing or using adhesives (tape, glue) directly on the walls or floor is NOT permitted. (In some cases, exceptions may be made for a specific class or project, with prior consent from the Exhibition Coordinator or the Facilities Dept.)
  • Artwork is NOT permitted in the restrooms.
  • Holes in the wall, beyond basic mounting or hanging and/or 1 inch or bigger, must be discussed with the Exhibition Coordinator and approved by the Director of Facilities.
  • Artists are responsible for fully de-installing artwork (including hanging devices) and returning the space to it’s original condition, or it may be removed.
  • If damages are made to any building infrastructure (i.e.: wall, floor, ceiling, window sill, window, sign, etc.) the repair will be handled by the Facilities Department and billed to the student. Such repairs will be handled by the Facilities Department as time and resources permit.
  • Please check with Facilities before turning out lights in display areas.
  • Artists are responsible for maintaining proper presentation of electronic media (e.g. monitoring on/off or looping video/ audio works, changing bulbs).

Please understand that these policies exist to provide all students, faculty and exhibiting artists with a uniform quality of space for their exhibitions. Thank you.

Please Note: Students should take precautions to protect their artwork from damage or theft by making sure their work is properly secured and installed safely, especially on floors open to the public (Lower Level, 1 and 2). Secure display cases are available for smaller artworks or pieces made from valuable materials (i.e. jewelry). Please see Chris Patch, Exhibition Coordinator, if you would like to reserve a case.

Life/Safety Policies:

  • Artwork installed in a manner that places the safety of the MECA community at risk or violates life/safety policies will be immediately removed by the Facilities Department. A discussion with the Dean of the College will follow as soon as possible after the removal of work installed in this manner.
  • Fire exits, fire extinguishers, fire extinguisher signage, fire pull stations, red emergency shutdown buttons, electrical panels and exit lighting shall not be blocked or visually obscured.
  • A straight 4-foot wide corridor shall be maintained in all hallways at all times.
  • No artwork shall be suspended from or in any manner attached to any of the electrical, plumbing, ventilation, or life-safety systems in the College.
  • Should you be running electrical wiring/extension cords on the floor in a travel lane, you must tape it down with gaffer’s tape to meet fire/safety guidelines. (Please see Facilities Department for the proper tape.)

Chris Patch, Exhibition Coordinator
Doug Doering, Director of Facilities
Erin Hutton, Director of Exhibitions & Special Projects

Sexual Misconduct, Anti-Discrimination, and Anti-Harassment Services, Policies, & Procedures

Policy

Maine College of Art will not tolerate any behavior that constitutes sexual misconduct, including sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking, harassment or discrimination by members of the College community or its guests or vendors. The College believes that sexual misconduct, discrimination and harassment threaten human dignity, undermine the integrity of the entire community and represent a failure in ethical and professional behavior. Sexual harassment is perhaps the most well-known form of harassment or discrimination, but Maine College of Art takes all claims of sexual misconduct, harassment and discrimination as seriously as claims of sexual harassment and follows the same procedures for reporting and investigating all forms of sexual misconduct, harassment and discrimination. This policy applies to all members of Maine College of Art community including trustees, students, faculty, employees, staff, volunteers, invited guests or vendors. In addition to any consequences that may arise from a violation of the Maine College of Art’s policy against sexual misconduct, harassment and discrimination, any person who engages in any form of this conduct in violation of this policy may also be subject to civil and/or criminal liability. This conduct is prohibited by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act as amended in 2008 and the Maine Human Rights Act.

Title IX Coordinator

The Title IX Coordinator for the Maine College of Art is Beth Elicker, Executive Vice President of the College. She can be reached at 207.699.5045 or belicker@meca.edu. Any complaints or concerns about sexual misconduct, including sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking should be reported as soon as possible to Beth Elicker. Any other member of the faculty or staff who receives a report of any form of sexual misconduct must report it as soon as possible to Beth Elicker.

Definitions

A. Harassment
Harassment means oral, written, graphic or physical conduct relating to an individual’s personal characteristics including but not limited to gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, disability, genetic information, HIV status, race, age, religion, national or ethnic origin, or military/veteran’s status which has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with the victim’s education or employment or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment. Prohibited harassment may include, for example, racial, religious or ethnic slurs, negative comments about surnames, nicknames emphasizing stereotypes, and/or the imitation of a person’s mannerisms, speech, or movements.

B. Nondiscrimination
It is the policy of Maine College of Art not to discriminate on the basis of gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, disability, genetic information, HIV status, race, age, religion, national or ethnic origin, or military/veteran’s status in its educational programs, admissions policies, employment policies, financial aid, or other College administered programs. This policy is enforced by Federal Law under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. It is also enforced under Maine law through the Maine Human Rights Act at 5 M.R.S.A. section 4551 et. seq.

C. Sexual harassment
Sexual harassment is defined under Title IX and the Maine Human Rights Act as unwelcome sexual advances; requests for sexual favors; sexual contact, gestures, comments; or other physical or verbal conduct of a sexual nature. Current law provides that such conduct is unlawful when:

  1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or educational benefits;
  2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for academic or employment decisions affecting that individual; or
  3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s academic or professional performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive employment or educational environment.

In line with its policy on sexual harassment, the College condemns the sexual exploitation of professional relationships among and between faculty, students, administrative staff and/ support staff. All faculty and staff should be aware that consenting romantic or sexual relationships may constitute sexual harassment under this policy. Because of the power differential in such relationships, it should not be assumed that consent will act as a defense against a claim of sexual harassment.

The College requires that a faculty or staff member in a romantic or sexual relationship with an individual over whom they exercise any form of authority or decision making must act immediately to eliminate this conflict of interest by removing him/herself from any decision affecting the other individual, including but not limited to grading, evaluating, supervising or in any way influencing any of the terms or conditions of that individual’s education and/or position of employment. Faculty members should report such a relationship to the Dean of the College and work with the Dean to eliminate the conflict of interest as soon as possible. Staff members should report such a relationship to the Executive Vice President or their supervising Vice President for the same purpose.

All new faculty, staff and students are required to attend a sexual harassment information session at the beginning of the academic year. In addition, returning faculty, staff and students are strongly encouraged to attend the information session annually. Maine College of Art also sends a written notice of its sexual harassment policy to the entire College community on an annual basis.

D. Sexual Assault or Sexual Violence

Sexual Assault or Sexual Violence is having or attempting to have sexual intercourse with another individual: (1) by use of force or threat; (2) without effective consent; or(3) where the individual is incapacitated or physically or mentally unable to make informed or reasonable judgments. For purposes of this definition, sexual intercourse includes vaginal, anal or oral penetration, no matter how slight, with any body part or object, or oral penetration involving any form of mouth to genital contact. For purposes of these policies, Sexual Assault or Sexual Violence includes rape, fondling, incest or statutory rapes as those crimes are defined by the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting Program. This definition conforms to the Clery Act definition and the definition of rape under Maine law.

E. Non-Consensual Sexual Contact

Non-Consensual Sexual Contact is contact with the intimate parts of another individual for the purposes of sexual gratification through the (1) the use of threat or force; (2) without effective consent or (3) where the individual is incapacitated or physically or mentally unable to make informed, reasonable judgments.

F. Sexual Exploitation

Sexual Exploitation is taking non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for one’s own benefit or the benefit of anyone other than the individual being exploited. Sexual exploitation may also include but is not limited to: (1) secretly observing the sexual actions of another or allowing others to secretly observe the sexual activity without the knowledge or consent of the other party; (2) sharing visual images, audio recordings, videos of another individual without consent; (3) causing an individual to prostitute him or herself through force, intimidation or coercion of any kind; and (4) knowingly exposing another individual to a sexually transmitted disease without their knowledge.

G. Dating Violence

Dating Violence is violence by a person who has been in a romantic or intimate relationship with the complainant. The determination of whether there was a “social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature” is based on the complainant’s characterization of the relationship, the length and type of the relationship, and the frequency of the interaction between the parties. The use of terms such as “hooking up” or “hanging out” instead of “dating” is not determinative. Emotional and psychological abuse is not encompassed in this definition. Dating violence also does not include Domestic Violence.

H. Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence includes asserted violent misdemeanor and felony offenses committed by the complainant’s current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, person similarly situated under domestic or family violence law or anyone else protected under domestic or family violence law.

I. Stalking

Stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for her, his or another’s safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress. “Course of conduct” means two or more acts, including but not limited to acts in which the stalker directly or indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person or interferes with a person’s property. “Reasonable person” means a person under similar circumstances and with similar identities as the complainant. “Substantial emotional distress” means a significant mental suffering or anguish that may but does not necessarily require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

J. Consent

Consent is the affirmative, unambiguous and voluntary agreement to engage in a specific sexual activity during a sexual encounter. Consent given at the start of sexual activity may not be understood to apply to each individual sexual action during the encounter. Each party must clearly consent to each act during the sexual encounter.

Consent may not be inferred from silence.

Consent is not voluntary if it is induced by force, threat or deception.

An individual who is incapacitated by drugs or alcohol, who is asleep, blacked out or unconscious or otherwise physically or mentally incapacitated is not capable of consent and consent may never be assumed. Acts of sexual misconduct and the failure to obtain consent are never excused by incapacitation because of drug or alcohol consumption.

Consent may be withdrawn at any time and if it is, sexual activity of any kind must stop. Consent to one form of sexual activity does not constitute consent to all forms of sexual activity, and consent to sexual activity with one person does not equal consent to engage in sexual activity with anyone else.

Maine law on consent: Minors who are 14 or 15 cannot legally consent to sexual activity if the other party is at least five (5) years older. Minors under 14 can never legally consent to sexual activity. Such sexual acts are felonies under Maine law.

SCOPE

Applicability
The College’s Sexual Misconduct, Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy applies to all faculty, Trustees, staff, administration, supervisors, employees, students, vendors, volunteers and visitors to campus. This includes guests, patrons, independent contractors, or clients of the College. This Policy prohibits sexual misconduct, sexual harassment and discrimination in any College education program or activity, which means all academic, educational, extracurricular, and other programs.

Off-campus Programs
Off–campus programs and activities are covered by this policy and include, but are not limited to, study abroad programs, internships, participation in affiliated programs, student teaching, and applied learning such as on-line courses. Faculty, staff, administration, supervisors, employees, volunteers and students who feel that they have experienced sexual misconduct, including sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking, discrimination and/or harassment while participating in off-campus programs and activities should immediately report such incidents to the program director, the Director of Student Affairs, and/or the Title IX Coordinator. Non-College visitors, guests, patrons, independent contractors or clients who fail to address sexual misconduct, discrimination and/or harassment of which they know or should have known by their personnel on College premises under their control may be subjected to whatever sanctions the relationship with the College permits.

Employment Decisions
This policy is not meant to address differences in opinion regarding validity of employment determinations such as salary recommendations, promotion and tenure decisions, performance evaluations, hiring decisions, job classification decisions, transfers or reassignments, termination or layoff because of lack of work or elimination of a position, and normal supervisory counseling. Furthermore, this policy does not intend to address behaviors that do not constitute sexual misconduct, discrimination or harassment. Offensive workplace behavior that does not violate this policy should be addressed to the appropriate supervisor or office.

Academic Freedom & Freedom of Expression
The College is committed to protecting, maintaining and encouraging both freedom of expression and the academic freedom of inquiry, teaching, service, and research. However, these freedoms come with a responsibility that all members of the education community benefit from these freedoms without intimidation. In recognition and support of academic freedom for faculty in the pursuit of teaching, academic freedom and freedom of expression shall be strongly considered in investigating and reviewing complaints and reports of discrimination, harassment or sexual misconduct. However, raising issues of academic freedom and freedom of expression will not excuse behavior that constitutes a violation of the law or the College’s Sexual Misconduct, Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy.

Responsibility of Supervisors and Others in Positions of Authority
No individual who is in a position of authority over another, either in the employment or educational context, has the authority to discriminate against, harass or engage in acts of sexual misconduct by virtue of his or her role. The University does not in any way, expressly or impliedly, condone sexual misconduct, including sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking, discrimination or harassment by any employee or person in a position of authority, including an administrator, or a supervisor. Furthermore, a supervisor, administrator, faculty member, or person in a position of authority who does not appropriately handle reports or incidents of sexual misconduct, discrimination and/or harassment, or who does not report incidents about which he/she becomes aware to the Title IX Coordinator may be subject to disciplinary action. All members of the College community including students, contract vendors, trustees, employees and others should report any sexual misconduct, discrimination and/or harassment that they experience and/or observe to the Title IX Coordinator. No MECA community member should assume that an official of the College knows about any particular situation of concern involving sexual misconduct, discrimination or harassment. All incidents must be reported to Beth Elicker, Title IX Coordinator.

Responsible Employees
Any employee of the College who is responsible in any way for student welfare and who is not by law, licensure or College regulation designated as a confidential resource, must share any report of discrimination, harassment or sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator. This definition of “responsible employee” includes faculty, administrators, security officers, advisors, staff, RAs and other student employees involved in promoting student welfare. This does not pertain to on-campus counselors who are designated as a confidential resource.

If a responsible employee receives a complaint, before hearing it fully, the responsible employee should be clear with the complainant that (1) they are not a confidential resource, if they are not so designated, and (2) they are obligated to report any incident to the Title IX Coordinator.

Guidance for Reporting a Violation of the Sexual Misconduct, Anti-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy

A. Counseling resources:
Counseling are available to anyone who thinks that he or she has been the victim of harassment, discrimination, sexual misconduct including sexual assault, dating violence, stalking, or domestic violence. Individuals can contact an advocate as a first step in seeking help. These resources provide consistent support and information, exploration of options, connection with local resources, safety planning, and help with legal options, and medical attention. Resources marked with an * are designated confidential.

B. Campus Resources:

a. Title IX Coordinator
The Title IX Coordinator for the Maine College of Art is Beth Elicker, Executive Vice President of the College. She can be reached at 207.699.5045 or belicker@meca.edu.

b. Counseling & Wellness*
The College has an on-site counselor available weekdays for crisis counseling. Free confidential counseling, support, and referral services are available by emailing counseling@meca.edu. After hours and weekends, the student can call the Student Life on-call number 207.228.3474 to request talking with a counselor or to be referred to other resources.

c. Student Life
The Director of Student Life can be reached at studentlife@meca.edu, 207.699.5035 (during office hours). The on-call Student Life staff member can be reached at 207.228.3474 (24/7).

d. Residence Life
The Residence Life Coordinator can be reached at housing@meca.edu, 207.699.5067 (during office hours), or 207.776.4176 (24/7).

C. Off-Campus Resources

a. The Maine Coalition to End Domestic Violence*
Offers 24-hour free confidential support, advocacy, and resources for those affected by relationship abuse available by phone at 1.866.834.4357 and on their website at www.mcedv.org.

b. The Maine Coalition Against Sexual Assault*
Offers 24-hour free confidential support, advocacy, and resources for anyone affected by sexual assault, stalking, or sexual harassment available at 1.800.871.7741 and on their website at www.mecasa.org

c. Sexual Assault Response Services of Southern Maine*
Offers 24-hour free confidential crisis response, support, and advocacy for anyone affected by sexual assault, stalking, or sexual harassment at 1.800.313.9900 or at www.sarsonline.org.

d. Maine Medical Center Emergency Department*: 662 Bramhall Street, 207.622.0111.

e. Portland Police Department: Contact 911 for emergencies or 207.874.8575 for non-emergencies.

D. Confidentiality
Complete confidentiality can only be granted by professional counselors, therapists or clergy. The College will, however, whenever possible, honor a request by the complainant for confidentiality. Any request for confidentiality must be balanced against the College’s obligation to provide a safe and non-discriminatory environment for the entire College community. The College may also be severely limited in its ability to take action against a charged student if strict confidentiality is maintained. The Title IX Coordinator, Vice-President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, and Director of Student Life or Vice-President of Institutional Advancement shall be responsible for evaluating all requests for confidentiality and will consider the severity of the alleged conduct, the ages of the parties, any pattern of misconduct and the rights of the charged student.
In any case where a complaint discloses a serious, immediate or continuing threat to others in the College community, the College will issue a campus wide alert. However, such an alert shall not contain any identifying information about the complainant. In addition, no information about the complainant will be released to the public in any fashion without the consent of the complainant.
The College reserves the right to investigate and resolve a complaint or report of discrimination, sexual misconduct and/or harassment regardless of whether the complainant ultimately desires the College to pursue the complaint. In such cases, the parties shall be informed of the status of the investigation at reasonable times until the College’s final disposition of the investigation.

E. Reporting
Reporting alleged violations of this policy as soon as possible to the appropriate person is very important in order to help safeguard the well-being and rights of both the complainant and the charged party and other members of the College community. Potential complainants, if they are able, should write down details of the incident/s as soon after they occur as possible and be sure to note the names of any persons who may have been witnesses to the incident/s.

  1. Complaints about alleged violations by students should be made to the Title IX Coordinator who will report the complaint to the Director of Student Life.
  2. Complaints about alleged violations by a faculty member should be made to the Title IX Coordinator who shall report the complaint to the Dean of the College.
  3. Complaints about alleged violations by staff, vendors or guests should be made to the Title IX Coordinator.
  4. Complaints about alleged violations by the President of the College should be made to the Title IX Coordinator who shall report the complaint to the Chair of the Board of Trustees.
  5. Complaints about alleged violations of gender equity by the College in any of its programs in violation of Title IX should be made to the Title IX Coordinator.
  6. In all cases involving allegations of Sexual misconduct or other criminal violations the College will also counsel the alleged victim of his or her right to report the incident to the police for criminal investigation. The College will also provide any student who wishes to make a report to law enforcement with assistance in doing so.
  7. In any case involving a counter complaint by the charged party against the original complainant the counter complaint should be made to the Title IX Coordinator as set forth above. Each complaint will be handled pursuant to the procedures set forth below.

F. Retaliation
Retaliation against any member of the College community who reports a possible incident of sexual misconduct, harassment or discrimination is also a violation of the policy and the individual responsible for the retaliation will be subject to disciplinary action by the College.

Complaint Procedure

The College has established the following procedures to provide all members of the College community with the opportunity to seek internal resolution when they think there has been a violation of the sexual misconduct, anti-harassment and anti-discrimination policy.

A. Complaints Against Students

After the Director of Student Life receives the complaint from the Title IX Coordinator, the Director or the Director’s designee will interview the complainant and request that the complaint be reduced to writing. The Director will review the complaint and if the Director determines there is a basis for the complaint, the Director will meet with the charged party and request the charged party to make a written response to the charge. If the charged party does make a written response, the charged party will then be permitted to see a copy of the written complaint from the complainant. If the charged party does not make a written statement, the charged party is not entitled to see any written statement made by the complainant. The complainant will be given a copy of the charged party’s written statement, if the complainant has provided a written statement. The Director will discuss the anti-retaliation and confidentiality policies with both parties.

If the Director determines there is no basis to the complaint and declines to take any action against the charged party, the Director will provide both parties with a written decision to that effect. The complainant may appeal that determination to the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College. The appeal must be in writing and must be made to the Dean within seven days of the Director’s decision not to act on the original complaint.

If either party thinks there is a conflict of interest in having to report to the Director of Student Life, either party can inform the Director of their specific concern and request the Director to excuse herself or himself from their case. If the Director agrees there is a conflict, the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College will appoint someone to act in the place of the Director. If the Director does not agree there is a conflict, and either party continues to think there is, either party can appeal the conflict of interest decision to the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College who will make a final determination. If either party thinks there is a conflict of interest in dealing with the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College, they may appeal that issue to the President of the College whose resolution of the conflict issue will be final.

At any time after the receipt of the complaint the Director, in consultation with senior administrators when appropriate, may take actions necessary to protect the safety of the parties or the community during the pendency of the investigation, including but not limited to changing class and/or work schedules, or issuing no-contact orders. The decision by the Director and/or a senior administrator to take such an action creates no presumption that the charged party has engaged in the alleged discriminatory or otherwise inappropriate conduct.

If it is necessary to gather additional information after meeting with both parties, the Director has seven days from the time the charged party receives notice of the complaint to conduct any further investigation of the complaint. PLEASE NOTE: This time frame and all others referred to in this policy may be extended for good cause by the Director or the Director’s designee, and if a time frame is to be extended, both parties will be notified of the extension by the responsible administrative office of the College.

Possible Actions by the Director of Student Life
Informal Resolution: When the Director of Student Life think it appropriate and after consultation with both parties, the Director may suggest Informal Resolution to resolve the complaint.

PLEASE NOTE: Informal resolution is never an option available to the Director when the complaint involves allegations of sexual misconduct even if both parties would agree to the process.

During the Informal Resolution process the Director or the Director’s designee will meet with both parties and may or may not meet with them together. A face-to-face meeting of the parties is not required. Either party may end the informal process at any time and request that the complaint be handled through the formal process. After the meetings, if the Director thinks it is appropriate, the Director will propose a possible resolution to both parties. If both parties agree to the resolution proposed by the Director, it will be put in writing and signed by both parties. If the parties do not agree to the resolution, or the Director otherwise decides it is appropriate to terminate the Informal Resolution process, the Director may then (1) impose discipline or (2) convene the Hearing Committee.

Imposition of Discipline: If the Director of Student Life determines that the charged party has violated the anti-harassment and/or discrimination policies and has also determined that the Informal Resolution process is not appropriate or that the Informal Resolution Process has been attempted and has failed, the Director may impose discipline for the violation of the policy. The Director may impose:

  • Disciplinary Warning
  • Disciplinary Probation
  • Disciplinary Suspension for two weeks or less (as defined in the Student Conduct Code)
  • Other remedies deemed appropriate by the Director without convening the Hearing Committee.

If either party disagrees with the Director’s decision to impose a Disciplinary Warning, Disciplinary Probation or Disciplinary Suspension for two weeks or less, or another remedy deemed appropriate by the Director, either party may appeal the Director’s decision to the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College. The appeal must be given to the Dean within seven days of the receipt of the Director’s decision by the charged party. The appeal must be in writing and must clearly set forth the reason for the appeal. The decision of the Dean will be final.

Hearing Committee: If the Director of Student Life determines that the appropriate discipline for a charged party is either Disciplinary Suspension for longer than two weeks or Disciplinary Expulsion or in any case involving allegations of sexual misconduct, the Director will so inform the parties and ask the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College to convene the Hearing Committee.

At the start of each academic year, the President will appoint 16 members to the Hearing Committee: six representatives from the faculty, six representatives from the staff and four representatives from the student body. All appointed members will receive orientation and training.

When the Director of Student Life requests the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College to convene the Hearing Committee, the Dean will select two faculty members, two staff members, and two student members from among the appointed representatives to sit on that panel, and the Committee will meet within seven days of the date when the Dean receives the request from the Director of Student Life or designee. The Dean will Chair the Hearing Committee and be a voting member. Whenever the complaint involves sexual misconduct, sexual violence or any other form of violence or the use of a weapon, student members shall not be selected for the panel. The case will be heard by the two faculty selected and the two staff members selected.

The Director of Student Life or the Director’s designee will present the case to the Hearing Committee and is not a voting member of the Committee. If the Hearing Committee should determine that further investigation is warranted or that additional information is needed, it will be conducted or provided by the Director of Student Life or the Director’s designee. The Director of Student Life in consultation with the Chair may present documentary evidence to the Hearing Committee. All evidence presented shall be in a form that complies with the applicable provisions of the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”). In all cases, the College will endeavor to complete all investigations and conduct any hearing that is necessary within sixty days of the initial complaint. If this is not possible, the parties will be informed and kept updated on the timeline for completion of the process.

The parties may provide the Chair with copies of any documents they would like presented to the Hearing Committee. The Director and the Chair shall have discretion to determine what, if any, documentary evidence shall be presented to the Hearing Committee.

The Hearing Committee may call witnesses but it is not required to do so. The parties may also submit names of possible witnesses to the Chair of the Hearing Committee and the Chair, and the Director of Student Life will decide which, if any, witnesses will appear before the Hearing Committee. If witnesses do appear before the Hearing Committee, the parties may question those witnesses within the discretion of and only indirectly through the Chair. If more than one witness is called before the Committee, all witnesses will be sequestered and will not be permitted to hear other witnesses testify. Once they have testified, the witnesses will be excused from the Hearing Committee room. If the complaint involves a charge of sexual assault or coercion, the parties are not required to appear in the Hearing Committee room together at the same time.

The complainant and the charged party will be provided with the documents, if any, that will be introduced and a list of the witnesses who will be called at the hearing at least 48 hours before the time of the hearing

The Hearing Committee meetings are not open to the public. Either party may have an advisor present with him or her. The advisor may be an individual from the College community, including an academic advisor, a fellow student or a member of the Maine College of Art faculty or staff. The College may but is not required to postpone a scheduled hearing date if the advisor cannot attend on that date provided the College has given the parties at least five days’ notice of the date of the hearing. Advisors may also be parents , other relatives or attorneys. Advisors may not participate orally or in writing at the hearing. Any advisor who disrupts the Hearing or fails to follow these guidelines may be removed from the Hearing by the Chair. The Rules of Evidence as used by the state and federal courts do not apply and the hearing shall not be recorded.

The Hearing Committee shall make its decision based only on the evidence presented to it during the hearing itself, and the standard for making a determination that the violation has occurred and that discipline should be imposed shall be by a preponderance of the evidence. All members of the Hearing Committee shall vote and decisions are determined by a vote of the majority. The Chair will issue a written decision which shall include Findings of Fact to the parties at the same time within seven days of the close of the Hearing Committee’s meetings on the complaint.

Sanctions
If the Hearing Committee determines that the charged party has violated the Sexual Misconduct, Anti-Discrimination, and Anti-Harassment Policies, the Hearing Committee may impose discipline for the violation of the policy. The following sanctions are available: Disciplinary Warning; Disciplinary Probation; Loss of Privileges; Restitution; Discretionary Sanctions; Residence Hall Suspension; Residence Hall Expulsion; College Suspension; College Expulsion; Revocation of Admission and/or Degree; Withholding Degree. Definitions of these sanctions can be found in the Code of Student Responsibility: Section VIII Sanctions.

Failure to comply with sanctions imposed through the College’s student conduct process, or with specific conditions related to the safety and security of any person(s) or property while a case is pending, may result in immediate, indefinite suspension or expulsion from the College without benefit for further process.

The decision of the Hearing Committee may be appealed to the President of the College by either party. The President may consider the Appeal or act through a designee. The appeal must be in writing and it must be filed in the President’s Office within seven days of the date upon which the parties received the Hearing Committee’s decision. The appeal (1) must be based on new information or evidence which was not and could not have been considered by the Hearing Committee and/or (2) must allege some significant procedural errors or conflict of interest by the Hearing Committee or one or more of its members that significantly impacted the outcome of the Hearing. The President shall not conduct a full rehearing of the case during the appeal and may meet with either party to the original complaint but is not required to do so. The President may consult with the Chair of the Hearing Committee as well as any members of the Administration not involved in the original decision of the Hearing Committee in making a final determination on the appeal. The President will issue a written decision to both parties within seven days of the receipt of the appeal in the President’s Office. The President’s decision shall be final.

PLEASE NOTE: All written decisions issued under this policy and involving students shall comply with the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

B. Complaints Against Faculty Members

After the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College receives the complaint from the Title IX Coordinator, the Dean or the Dean’s designee will meet with the complainant and request the complainant to submit the complaint in writing. The Dean will also meet with the charged party and request the charged party to make a written response to the complaint. If the charged party makes a written response, the Dean will give the charged party a copy of the written complaint. If the complainant did not make a written complaint and the charged party responds in writing, the complainant will not be given a copy of the charged party’s written response. The Dean will discuss the anti-retaliation and the confidentiality policies with both parties. If either party thinks there is a conflict of interest in having to report to the Dean, they should so inform the Dean and ask the Dean to recuse himself or herself from hearing the complaint. If the Dean agrees, the Dean will request the President to appoint another individual to hear the complaint.

If the Dean does not agree that there is a conflict of interest and either party is still concerned, either party may appeal the decision of the Dean to remain on the case to the President. This appeal must be made within two (2) days of the Dean’s decision and the President will issue a decision on the alleged conflict of interest within seven (7) days of receiving the appeal. The President’s decision is final. At any time after the receipt of the complaint the Dean, in consultation with other senior administrators, if appropriate, may take whatever actions he or she may deem necessary to protect the safety of the parties or the community, including but not limited to changing class and/or work schedules, issuing no-contact orders or suspending a party from his or her duties with pay pending a resolution of the complaint. The decision by the Dean and any other senior administrator to take such an action creates no presumption that the charged party has engaged in the alleged discriminatory or otherwise inappropriate conduct.

The Dean of the College or the Dean’s designee will conduct any necessary investigation and that investigation will be completed within seven (7) days of the Dean’s receipt of the complaint unless for good cause the Dean determines that more time is needed for the investigation. If the deadline is extended by the Dean, both parties will be notified.

If after an investigation the Dean of the College decides that there is no basis to the complaint, the Dean will notify both parties in writing. Within seven (7) days of the receipt of this decision either party may appeal the decision to the President who will make a final determination as to whether or not there is a basis to the complaint.

Possible Actions By the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College

Informal Resolution: When the Dean thinks it appropriate and after consultation with both parties, the Dean may suggest Informal Resolution to resolve the complaint. PLEASE NOTE: Informal resolution is never an option available to the Dean when the complaint involves allegations of sexual misconduct even if both parties would agree to the process. During the Informal Resolution process the Dean or the Dean’s designee will meet with both parties and may or may not meet with them together. Either party may end the informal process at any time and request that the complaint be handled through the formal process. A face-to-face meeting of the parties is not required. After the meetings, if the Dean thinks it is appropriate, the Dean will propose a possible resolution to both parties. If both parties agree to the resolution proposed by the Dean, it will be put in writing and signed by both parties. If the parties do not agree to the resolution, or the Dean otherwise decides it is appropriate to terminate the Informal Resolution process, the Dean may then convene the Hearing Committee.

Hearing Committee: If Informal Resolution is not appropriate or the Informal Resolution process fails, the Dean of the College will then ask the Executive Vice President to convene a panel of the Hearing Committee. The Executive Vice President will act as Chair and will be a voting member of the panel, and will also select three faculty members and three staff members from among the appointed representatives to sit on the panel.

The Dean or the Dean’s designee will present the case to the Hearing Committee and is not a voting member of the Committee. If the Hearing Committee should determine that further investigation is warranted or that additional information is needed, it will be conducted or provided by the Dean or the Dean’s designee. The Dean in consultation with the Chair of the Hearing Committee may present documentary evidence to the Hearing Committee. The parties may provide the Chair with copies of any documents they would like presented to the Hearing Committee. The Dean and the Chair shall have discretion to determine what, if any, documentary evidence shall be presented to the Hearing Committee. All evidence presented shall comply with the applicable provisions of the Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). The College will endeavor to complete all investigations and any hearing that may be necessary within sixty days of the receipt of the initial complaint. If the College is not able to meet this deadline, it will inform both parties of keep them both informed as to the new timeline.

The Hearing Committee may call witnesses but it is not required to do so. The parties may also submit names of possible witnesses to the Chair of the Hearing Committee, and the Chair, in consultation with the Dean, will decide which, if any, witnesses will appear before the Hearing Committee. If witnesses do appear before the Hearing Committee, the parties may question those witnesses within the discretion of and only indirectly through the Chair. If more than one witness is called before the Committee, all witnesses will be sequestered and will not be permitted to hear other witnesses testify. Once they have testified, the witnesses will be excused from the Hearing Committee room. If the complaint involves a charge of sexual misconduct, the parties are not required to appear in the Hearing Committee room together at the same time.

A list of the documents, if any, to be presented to the Committee and the witnesses, if any other than the parties, to be called shall be provided to the parties at least 48 hours prior to the time of the hearing.

The Hearing Committee meetings are not open to the public. Either party may have an advisor present with him or her. The advisor may be an individual from the College community, including an academic advisor, a fellow student or a member of the Maine College of Art faculty or staff. The College may but is not required to postpone a scheduled hearing date if the advisor cannot attend on that date provided the College has given the parties at least five days’ notice of the date of the hearing. Advisors may also be parents, other relatives or attorneys. Advisors may not participate orally or in writing at the hearing. Any advisor who disrupts the Hearing or fails to follow these guidelines may be removed from the Hearing by the Chair. The Rules of Evidence as used by the state and federal courts do not apply and the hearing shall not be recorded. The Dean will inform the charged party and the members of the Hearing Committee of the possible actions the Hearing Committee may take should it determine there has been a violation of the sexual misconduct, anti- harassment and anti-discrimination policy.

The Hearing Committee shall make its decision based only on the evidence presented to it during the hearing itself, and the standard for making a determination that the violation has occurred and that discipline should be imposed shall be a preponderance of the evidence. All members of the Hearing Committee shall vote and decisions are determined by a vote of the majority. The Chair will issue a written decision which shall include Findings of Fact to the parties within seven days of the close of the Hearing Committee’s meetings on the complaint.

The decision of the Hearing Committee may be appealed to the President of the College by either party. The President may consider the Appeal or act through a designee. The appeal must be in writing and it must be filed in the President’s Office within seven days of the date upon which the parties received the Hearing Committee’s decision. The appeal (1) must be based on new information or evidence was not and could not have been considered by the Hearing Committee and/or (2) must allege some significant procedural errors or conflict of interest by the Hearing Committee or one or more of its members that significantly impacted the outcome of the hearing. The President may meet with either party to the original complaint but is not required to do so. The President may consult with the Chair of the Hearing Committee as well as any members of the Administration not involved in the original decision of the Hearing Committee in making a final determination on the appeal. The President will issue a written decision to both parties within seven days of the receipt of the appeal in the President’s Office. The President’s decision shall be final.

PLEASE NOTE: All written decisions issued under this policy and involving students shall comply with the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

C. Complaints Against Staff, Vendors or Guests

When a complaint is made against a vendor or a guest to the College, the Executive Vice President who is also the Title IX Coordinator will decide what actions, if any, are to be taken and the Executive Vice President’s decision will be final. The Executive Vice President may consult with any members of the senior administration before reaching a decision on any such complaint.

After the Executive Vice President receives the complaint, the Executive Vice President will meet with the complainant and request the complainant to submit the complaint in writing. The Executive Vice President will also meet with the charged party and ask the charged party to provide a written statement in response to the complaint. If the charged party provides a written response, the charged party will also be given a copy of the complainant’s written statement. If the complainant provided a written statement, the complainant shall also receive a copy of the charged party’s written statement. The Executive Vice President will discuss the anti-retaliation and the confidentiality policies with both parties.

If either party thinks there is a conflict of interest in having to report to the Executive Vice President, they should so inform the Executive Vice President and ask the Executive Vice President to excuse himself or herself from hearing this complaint. If the Executive Vice President agrees, the Executive Vice President will request the President to appoint another individual to hear the complaint. If the Executive Vice President does not agree that there is a conflict of interest and either party is still concerned, either party may appeal the decision of the Executive Vice President to hear the complaint to the President. This appeal must be made within two days of the Executive Vice President’s decision and the President will issue a decision on the alleged conflict of interest within seven days of receiving the appeal. The President’s decision is final.

At any time after the receipt of the complaint the Executive Vice President, in consultation with other senior administrators, if appropriate, may take whatever actions he or she may deem necessary to protect the safety of the parties or the community, including but not limited to changing class and/or work schedules, issuing no-contact orders or suspending a party from his or her duties with pay pending a resolution of the complaint. The decision by the Executive Vice President and/or any other senior administrator to take such an action creates no presumption that the charged party has engaged in the alleged discriminatory or otherwise inappropriate conduct.

The Executive Vice President or the Executive Vice President’s designee will conduct any necessary investigation and that investigation will be completed within seven days of the Executive Vice President’s receipt of the complaint unless for good cause the Executive Vice President determines that more time is needed for the investigation. If the deadline is extended by the Executive Vice President both parties will be notified.

If after an investigation the Executive Vice President decides that there is no basis to the complaint, the Executive Vice President will notify both parties in writing. Within seven days of the receipt of this decision either party may appeal the decision to the President who will make a final determination as to whether or not there is a basis to the complaint.

Possible Actions By the Executive Vice President for Complaints Against Staff

Informal Resolution: When the Vice President thinks it appropriate and after consultation with both parties, the Vice President may suggest Informal Resolution to resolve the complaint. PLEASE NOTE: Informal resolution is never an option available to the Vice President when the complaint involves allegations of sexual misconduct even if both parties would agree to the process. During the Informal Resolution process the Vice President or the Vice President’s designee will meet with both parties and may or may not meet with them together. A face-to- face meeting of the parties is not required. After the meetings, if the Vice President thinks it is appropriate, the Vice President will propose a possible resolution to both parties. If both parties agree to the resolution proposed by the Vice President, it will be put in writing and signed by both parties. If the parties do not agree to the resolution, or the Vice President otherwise decides it is appropriate to terminate the Informal Resolution process, the Vice President may then convene the Hearing Committee.

Hearing Committee: If Informal Resolution is not appropriate or the Informal Resolution process fails, the Vice President will then ask the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College (“the Chair”) to convene a panel of the Hearing Committee. The Dean will act as Chair and will be a voting member of the panel, and will also select three faculty members and three staff members from among the appointed representatives to sit on the panel.

The Vice President will present the case to the Hearing Committee and will not be a voting member. If the Hearing Committee should determine that further investigation is warranted or that additional information is needed, it will be conducted or provided by the Vice President or the Vice President’s designee. The Vice President in consultation with the Chair may present documentary evidence to the Hearing Committee. The parties may provide the Chair with copies of any documents they would like presented to the Hearing Committee. The Vice President and the Chair shall have discretion to determine what, if any, documentary evidence shall be presented to the Hearing Committee. All evidence presented shall comply with all applicable provisions of the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”). ). The College will endeavor to complete all investigations and any hearing that may be necessary within sixty days of the receipt of the initial complaint. If the College is not able to meet this deadline, it will inform both parties of keep them both informed as to the new timeline.

The Hearing Committee may call witnesses but it is not required to do so. The parties may also submit names of possible witnesses to the Chair, and the Chair, in consultation with the Vice President, will decide which, if any, witnesses will appear before the Hearing Committee. If witnesses do appear before the Hearing Committee, the parties may question those witnesses within the discretion of and only indirectly through the Chair. If more than one witness is called before the Committee, all witnesses will be sequestered and will not be permitted to hear other witnesses testify. Once they have testified, the witnesses will be excused from the Hearing Committee room. If the complaint involves a charge of sexual assault or coercion, the parties are not required to appear in the Hearing Committee room together at the same time.

A list of the documents, if any, to be presented to the Committee and the witnesses, if any other than the parties, to be called shall be provided to the parties at least 48 hours prior to the time of the hearing.

The Hearing Committee meetings are not open to the public. Either party may have an advisor present with him or her. The advisor may be an individual from the College community, including an academic advisor, a fellow student or a member of the Maine College of Art faculty or staff. The College may but is not required to postpone a scheduled hearing date if the advisor cannot attend on that date provided the College has given the parties at least five days’ notice of the date of the hearing. Advisors may also be parents, other relatives or attorneys. Advocates may not participate orally or in writing at the hearing. Any advisor who disrupts the Hearing or fails to follow these guidelines may be removed from the Hearing by the Chair. The Rules of Evidence as used by the state and federal courts do not apply and the hearing shall not be recorded. The Vice President will inform the charged party and the members of the Hearing Committee of the possible actions the Hearing Committee may take should it determine there has been a violation of the sexual misconduct, anti- harassment and anti-discrimination policy.

The Hearing Committee shall make its decision based only on the evidence presented to it during the hearing itself, and the standard for making a determination that the violation has occurred and that discipline should be imposed shall be a preponderance of the evidence. All members of the Hearing Committee shall vote and decisions are determined by a vote of the majority. The Chair will issue a written decision which shall include Findings of Fact to the parties at the same time within seven days of the close of the Hearing Committee’s meetings on the complaint.

The decision of the Hearing Committee may be appealed to the President of the College. The President may consider the Appeal or act through a designee. The appeal must be in writing and it must be filed in the President’s Office within seven days of the date upon which the parties received the Hearing Committee’s decision. The appeal (1) must be based on new information or evidence that was not could not have been considered by the Hearing Committee and/or (2) must allege some significant procedural errors or conflict of interest by the Hearing Committee or one or more of its members that significantly impacted the outcome of the Hearing. The President may meet with either party to the original complaint but is not required to do so. The President may consult with the Chair of the Hearing Committee as well as any members of the Administration not involved in the original decision of the Hearing Committee in making a final determination on the appeal. The President will issue a written decision to both parties within seven days of the receipt of the appeal in the President’s Office. The President’s decision shall be final.

PLEASE NOTE: All written decisions issued under this policy and involving students shall comply with the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

D. Complaints Against the President of the College
When the Chair of the Board of Trustees receives a complaint against the President of the College from the Title IX Coordinator, the Chair of the Board or the Chair’s designee will meet with the complainant and request that the complaint be put in writing. The Chair of the Board will meet with the President and request a written response to the complaint from the President. If the President provides a written response and the complaint has put the complaint in writing, both the complainant and the President shall receive copies of each other’s written statements. The Chair of the Board or the Chair’s designee will inform both parties of the anti-retaliation and the confidentiality policies.

At any time after the receipt of the complaint the Chair of the Board may request a senior member of the administration to take whatever actions he or she may deem necessary to protect the safety of the parties or the community, including but not limited to changing class and/or work schedules, issuing no-contact orders or suspending a party from his or her duties with pay pending a final determination on the complaint. Any such actions involving the employment status or the terms of employment of the President of the College can only be carried out after a vote of the Board of Trustees. The decision by the Chair of the Board, the Board of Trustees and/ or the senior administrator to take such an action creates no presumption that the President has engaged in the alleged discriminatory or otherwise inappropriate conduct.

If the Chair of the Board or the Chair’s designee determines that additional investigation is required, the Chair of the Board or Chair’s designee may request a member of the senior administration to undertake the necessary investigation. The senior administrator shall report the results of the investigation only to the Chair of the Board or the Chair’s designee. If the President objects to the senior administrator selected to conduct the investigation based on a perceived conflict of interest, the President may present the conflict of interest and request the Chair of the Board or the Chair’s designee to select a different administrator to conduct the investigation. The Chair of the Board or the Chair’s designee shall consult with two other members of the Board of Trustees chosen by the President and make a final determination on which administrator shall conduct the investigation.

If the Chair or the Chair’s designee determines there is a basis for the complaint, the Chair shall convene a subcommittee of the Board of Trustees to review the complaint and to determine what, if any, disciplinary action should be taken against the President. This subcommittee shall consist of four members of the Board of Trustees and be chaired by the Chair of the Board who shall be a voting member. The Chair of the Board or the Chair’s designee shall select two members of the subcommittee, and two members of the subcommittee shall be chosen by the President. The results of any investigation conducted shall be presented to the subcommittee by the senior administrator who conducted the investigation at the request of the Chair of the Board or the Chair’s designee.

The subcommittee may meet with the parties but is not required to do so. The subcommittee meetings are not open to the public. If the President is asked to appear before the subcommittee, the President may be accompanied by a member of the Maine College of Art faculty or staff or senior administration or an attorney. If a member of the faculty or staff is requested to appear before the subcommittee, he or she may be accompanied by a member of the faculty or staff of Maine College of Art or an attorney. If a student is requested to appear before the subcommittee, he or she may be accompanied by member of the faculty or staff , a fellow student from Maine College of Art, a parent or other relative or an attorney, . Advocates for any party may not participate orally or in writing in the subcommittee Hearing. Any advocate who disrupts the hearing in any way or fails to observe these guidelines may be removed from the Hearing by the Chair.

The subcommittee has the discretion to consider documentary evidence and may call witnesses. Both parties may supply the subcommittee with copies of documents they would like to have considered and with the names of witnesses they would like the subcommittee to call. It is entirely within the discretion of the subcommittee as to whether or not those documents will be considered or those witnesses asked to appear before the subcommittee. If witnesses are called before the subcommittee, parties may question those witnesses within the discretion of and only indirectly through the Chair. If more than one witness is called before the subcommittee, all witnesses will be sequestered and will not be permitted to hear other witnesses testify. Once they have testified, the will be excused from the subcommittee Hearing room. If the charges involve sexual misconduct, the parties are not required to be in the subcommittee Hearing room at the same time. The Rules of Evidence as used in state and federal courts do not apply and the hearings will not be recorded.

The subcommittee will, whenever possible, reach a decision within 14 days of the receipt of the complaint by the Chair of the Board of Trustees. The decision of the subcommittee must be based only on the evidence presented to it at its meetings and must be based on a preponderance of the evidence. All committee members must vote and the decision shall be based on a majority vote. If the decision involves disciplinary action against the President of the College, the Chair of the Board or Chair’s designee will inform the President of the College personally of that decision as soon as possible after it is made. The complainant will also receive a copy of the subcommittee’s written decision at the same time.The subcommittee’s written decision must also include Findings of Fact.

Either party may appeal the decision of the subcommittee to the full Board of Trustees. The Chair of the Board or the Chair’s designee and the members of the subcommittee will not vote on the appeal. Appeals must be filed with the Chair of the Board in writing within seven days of the issuance of the decision by the subcommittee. The Chair of the Board will present the appeal to the full Board of Trustees and the Board will attempt to issue its final written decision within one month of its receipt of the appeal. The Board may request to speak with the complainant or the President but it is not required to do so. The meetings of the full Board of Trustees when it is acting on an appeal are not open to the public. The decision of the full Board of Trustees is final.

PLEASE NOTE: All written decisions issued under this policy and involving students shall comply with the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

AIDS Policy

Maine College of art has established an AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) policy in order to protect both the rights of individuals infected with HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) as well as the health and safety of all others at the institution. Maine College of Art will not require HIV testing of either its students or its employees. Those who would like more information on HIV testing may contact off-campus health-care centers: refer to “Counseling and Health resources” at the back of this handbook. Information about an individual’s HIV status may only be included in medical or health care records and not in general student or employee records. Furthermore, it is against the law to disclose HIV test results to anyone without the consent of the person tested. This means that no one, under any circumstances, may discuss or share records of HIV test results with anyone other than individuals designated in writing by the tested person. Disclosing someone’s HIV test results without written consent may result in disciplinary action under College policy. In addition, Maine law states that anyone who discloses another’s test results may be sued for actual damages and costs, plus a civil penalty, of up to $5,000.

Nondiscrimination Policy

It is the policy of Maine College of Art not to discriminate on the basis of gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, disability, genetic information, HIV status, race, age, religion, national or ethnic origin, or military/veteran’s status in its educational programs, admissions policies, employment policies, financial aid, or other College administered programs. This policy is enforced by Federal Law under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. It is also enforced under Maine law through the Maine Human Rights Act at 5 M.R.S.A. section 4551 et. seq.

Inquiries regarding compliance with these statutes may be directed to the Executive Vice President, Maine College of Art, 522 Congress St, Portland, Maine 04101, 800.639.4808 or 207.775.3052, or to Director, Office of Civil Rights, Department of Education, J.W. McCormack POCH, Room 701, Boston, MA. 02109- 4557, 617.223.9662 or the Maine Human Rights Commission, 51 State House Station, Augusta, Maine 04333-0051, 207.624.6050.

The Title IX Coordinator for Maine College of Art is the Executive Vice President.

Security & Crime Prevention Programs

During orientation in September students are informed of services offered by Maine College of Art. Students are told about crime on-campus and in surrounding neighborhoods. Similar information is presented to new employees. A common theme of all awareness and crime prevention programs is to encourage students and employees to be aware of their responsibility for their own security and the security of others. In addition to seminars, information is disseminated to students and employees through security alert posters, bulletin boards, and articles. When time is of the essence, information is released to the College community through security alerts posted prominently throughout campus, through memos sent over the College’s electronic mail system and physical means such as posters. The following is a listing of the crime prevention programs and projects in use at Maine College of Art.

Counseling Services
Counseling services are provided on campus, free of charge, to any student, victim of rape or sexual assault who desires this service.

Printed Crime Prevention Materials
The Department of Student Affairs prints and distributes numerous brochures and handouts relating to rape prevention, crime prevention, residence hall safety tips, and emergency reporting procedures. These handouts are also posted on residence hall bulletin boards and additional handouts are found at: http://www.sarsonline.org/defhelp_handouts.php.

These handouts are sponsored by Sexual Assault Response Services of Southern Maine.

Procedures for Campus Disciplinary Action
The accuser and accused will have the same rights to have others present at any hearing, including the assistance of an advisor.
The accuser and accused will both be informed of the outcome of any such hearings when the charge is a violent act. Victims must be informed of their option to notify proper law enforcement authorities, and their option to be assisted in doing so. If a sex offense or sexual assault is reported to any College official other than Maine College of Art, the victim will be informed of their option to notify proper law enforcement authorities and will be assisted in doing so if requested. Note: The evidence of any sex offense or sexual assault is critical in the investigation and must be secured as soon as possible.

Policy for Reporting The Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics

The Executive Vice President prepares this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. The full text of this report can be located at http://www.ope.ed.gov/security/. This report is prepared in cooperation with the local law enforcement agencies surrounding our main campus and alternate sites and residence life. Each entity provides updated information on their educational efforts and programs to comply with the Act. Campus crime, arrest and referral statistics include those reported to the designated campus officials (including but not limited to directors, deans, department heads, advisors of students/student organizations, athletic coaches), and local law enforcement agencies. Staff members at the Counseling and Wellness Office informs their clients of the procedures to report crime to the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the College on a voluntary or confidential basis, should they feel it is in the best interest of the client. A procedure is in place to anonymously capture crime statistics disclosed confidentially during such a session. Each year, an e-mail notification is made to all enrolled students that provides the access to this report. Faculty and staff receive similar email notifications. Copies of the report may also be obtained at the library, welcome desk, Facilities Management, Admissions, and Student Affairs. All prospective employees may obtain a copy from Human Resources.

Policy Statement Addressing Counselors

As a result of the negotiated rulemaking process which followed the signing into law, the 1998 amendments to 20 U.S.C. Section 1092 (f), clarification was given to those considered to be campus security authorities. Campus “Professional Counselors”, when acting as such, are not considered to be a campus security authority and are not required to report crimes for inclusion into the annual disclosure of crime statistics. As a matter of policy, they are encouraged; if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis for inclusion into the annual crime statistics. Professional Counselor: An employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing psychological counseling to members of the institution’s community within the scope of his or her license or certification.

Residence Hall Security Awareness
Crime prevention, safety, and security programs are presented in each residence hall at the beginning of each semester.

Access to Campus Facilities
Most MECA buildings and facilities are accessible to the campus community, guests, and visitors during normal business hours 8:00 a.m – 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Access to Campus Residence Halls
Access is granted to residents via an electronic access control system. Guests may gain access by calling a resident living in the hall and being escorted in by that individual. Exterior doors to residence halls are locked 24 hours a day. Emergencies may necessitate changes or alterations to any posted schedules.

Sex Offense or Sexual Assault Awareness, Education, and Prevention
For individual assistance in the area of sex offense or sexual assault prevention, students may consult any of the sex offense or sexual assault victim advocates: Counseling and Wellness counselor or members of local Portland Area counselors. Students believed to be in violation of Maine College of Art and/or the Residence Life policies meet with Student Life Staff. Students found responsible for violating policy can be sanctioned with the following: warning, probation, termination of housing contract, and/or suspension. Other education sanctions can also be imposed.

Maine Sex Offender Registry
In accordance to the “Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act” of 2000, the Maine College of Art is providing a link to the Maine Sex Offender Registry. This act requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement information provided by a State concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires sex offenders already required to register in a State to provide notice of each institution of higher education in the State at which the person is employed, carries a vocation, or is a student. In Maine, convicted sex offenders must register with the Maine Sex Offender Registry maintained by the Department of State Police. At Maine College of Art, we provide information about any registered sex offenders in our area. The State of Maine Bureau of Identification is the base for the Maine Sex Offender Registry program. Our local law enforcement agencies, the Portland Police Department and the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office also provide information regarding registered sex offenders. Please use the link below to view all registered sex offenders in the area of the Maine College of Art:
www.informe.org/sor/

Timely Warnings
In the event that a situation arises, either on or off campus, that, in the judgment of the President, any Vice President or officer of the College, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a campus wide “timely warning” will be issued. The warning will be issued through MECA e-mai;, posting on all entrances, MECA Café, and residence halls. Depending on the particular circumstances of the crime, especially in all situations that could pose an immediate threat to the community and individuals, College officers will post a notice on campus-wide bulletin boards providing the College community with more immediate notification. Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to a member of the Student Life staff or by calling 207.228.3474.

Technology Electronic Communications Policy

Technology Electronic Communications Policy

Definitions of Terms

Account: Any I.D. and password combination issued by the Maine College of Art for access to electronic communication systems or computer resources.

User: Any person who uses a Maine College of Art electronic communication system or computer resource.

Electronic resources: Computer files and software, including but not limited to those which reside on disks and other storage media, individual computers, networked servers, or other electronic communications systems.

Electronic communications systems: Computers and networks systems used in communicating or posting information or material by way of electronic mail, bulletin boards or web pages or other such electronic resources. Also includes, but is not limited to, remote internet access services and direct connections to the campus network.

System administrator: A person responsible for managing and operating an electronic communication system for the use of others.

General Statement of Principles
The Maine College of Art encourages the creative and innovative use of information technology to enhance its teaching, research, and public service mission. Users will not have their right to access denied or abridged due to the individual’s race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin or citizenship status, age, disability, or veteran’s status. The College respects the intellectual labor and creativity of others and seeks to protect the free and peaceful expression of ideas. All members of the College share responsibility for maintaining an environment where actions are guided by mutual respect, integrity, and reason.

The Maine College of Art expects all members of its community to use network systems with proper regard for the rights of others and the College. Abuse of these privileges will be subject to disciplinary action, as established by the operating policies and procedures of the College. The College reserves the right to limit access in response to evidence of violations of school policy or federal, state or local laws. All members of the College community are bound by federal, state and local laws relating to civil rights, harassment, copyright, security, pornography, privacy, and other statutes relating to electronic media.
It should be understood that this policy does not preclude enforcement under the laws and regulations of the United States of America, the State of Maine or local communities.

Who is Covered by this Policy
All users of Maine College of Art electronic communications systems are subject to the provisions of this policy, including those who rely on remote or off-campus access to these systems.

Use of these systems implies consent with this policy, as well as other applicable College policies and local, state and federal laws. For individuals whose network accounts are primarily for representing units or special projects, further policies may apply as governed by the needs of the unit or project.

Individual Privileges
The following individual privileges are extended to all users of electronic communication systems. However, it is understood that each of these privileges is conditioned upon acceptance of the accompanying responsibilities.

Free Expression: There shall be no restrictions placed on the fundamental rights to free speech except those necessary to protect the rights of others and to preserve the order necessary for the College to function as an institution of higher learning. Given the diverse cultural backgrounds of users, the College cannot protect individuals against exposure to materials that they may consider offensive. Nevertheless, the College reserves the right to take restrictive actions in response to complaints that posted material creates a hostile environment for individuals or classes of individuals. The College also has the right to take restrictive action when a user violates school policy or federal, state or local laws.

Privacy: Users may expect to keep personal electronic mail correspondence reasonably confidential. However, users should be sensitive to the inherent limitations of shared network resources in protecting privacy. Some examples of this may include printing personal messages on a shared printer, leaving a message or account open on a computer in a public computer lab, etc. Specific personal electronic communications and computer files will not be searched deliberately, except in an emergency or as part of a formal investigation by an authorized authority. Users are advised that backup of content contained in User accounts is the sole responsibility of the user. The Maine College of Art assumes no responsibility for damages or loss of productivity caused by the inability to retrieve information from the College’s electronic communications systems.

Due Process: The College will use due process in cases of discipline resulting from rules violations. The College’s administrative procedures promote fundamental fairness, although they do not follow the traditional common law adversarial method of a court of law. System administrators are authorized to take any actions deemed necessary to preserve the integrity of the system, including immediate temporary suspension of access by any user allegedly involved in a violation pending the outcome of an investigation. See below for the procedure for addressing violations of this policy.

Individual Responsibilities
Users of the Maine College of Art’s network systems accept responsibilities that include, but are not limited to, the following specific examples.

Respect for Intended Use of Resources: Users are responsible for all actions taken on their network account. Individual password security is the responsibility of the user and he/she should take precautions against others obtaining unauthorized access to his/her personal account. If the user allows another individual access to his/her account, the user assumes full responsibility for the actions of this individual while logged into his/her account. The College’s electronic communication systems are to be used only for the furtherance of the College’s mission and not for personal benefit.

Respect for Privacy of Others: Users shall not access anyone else’s electronic resources, including files and mail, without specific permission from the owner. Permission does not include sharing account information as designated above, but allows for collectively reading e-mail and sharing files using network services. The user shall not take advantage of another’s inexperience or negligence to gain access to any computer account, data, software, or file for which he or she has not received explicit permission to access.

Respect for Shared Nature of Resources: Users will not encroach on others’ use of the College’s computers and network facilities. No user should attempt to modify the College’s system or network facilities or to crash systems. Users should avoid activities that unreasonably tax systems resources, including but not limited to: sending an excessive number of messages either locally or over the Internet; participating in electronic chain letters, frivolously printing multiple copies of documents, files or data; excessive game playing; modifying system facilities, operating systems, or disk partitions; or damaging or vandalizing The College’s computing facilities, equipment, software, or computer files.

Respect for Rights of Others: The computing resources of the Maine College of Art will not be used to harm or threaten to harm the safety or environmental health of another individual or individuals. The user must comply with School policies and federal, state and local laws regarding discriminatory harassment. Examples of violations include, but are not limited to: harassment, defamation, violation of privacy, intentionally placing a person or persons in reasonable fear of imminent physical harm, giving or causing to be given false reports of fire or other dangerous conditions, or harassment or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin or citizenship status, age, disability, or veteran status.

Respect for Intellectual Property: Respect for intellectual labor and creativity is vital to the academic discourse and enterprise. This principle encompasses respect for the right to acknowledgment, right to privacy, and right to determine the form, manner, and terms of publication and distribution. Examples of violations include, but are not limited to: copying copyrighted software without express written permission of the copyright owner; failing to obtain necessary licensing for software or to adhere to all licensing provisions (installation, use, copying, number of simultaneous users, term of license, etc.); plagiarism or inadequate attribution of the intellectual property of others; posting of texts, images or audio works in disregard of copyright restrictions; or unauthorized publication or distribution of another’s work or writing.

Respect for Integrity of System or Network: Accounts shall not be used for unauthorized access and/or attempts to access computers, computer software, computer data or information, or networks without proper authorization, regardless of whether the computer, software, data, information, or network in question is owned by the College. Abuse of networks or computers at other sites using Maine College of Art resources will be treated as an abuse of computing privileges at the College. Users are prohibited from attempting to circumvent or subvert any system’s security measures.

Reporting Violations
If a user believes that a violation of this policy or criminal act has occurred, the user should contact the Technology Department. The College will take appropriate action in accordance with established procedures. Infractions that may be violations of federal, state, or local laws will be reported by the College to the appropriate authorities.

In some situations, it may be necessary to suspend account privileges to prevent ongoing misuse while the alleged violation is under investigation. The system administrator reserves the right to immediate temporary suspension of the account(s) of anyone suspected of a violation, pending the outcome of investigation by the appropriate office listed above. In the case of minor, first time offenses, the system administrator may choose to resolve the situation informally without reporting the violation to other College officials. Appeals of any disciplinary decision will be handled according to existing law, College policies, and disciplinary procedures.

Administration and Implementation
Systems administrators will manage network systems in a manner that is consistent with the system’s importance for campus communication and the need for privacy of personal electronic mail messages. In connection with their responsibilities, professional staff members may on occasion need access or monitor parts of the system and thereby be given access to the contents of certain electronic mail messages. System administrators will respect the privacy of personal communications encountered on the systems. However, if, during the course of routine duties, a system administrator encounters information that indicates that a breach of this policy or criminal act has been or is about to be committed, they will report the existence and source of this information to the proper authorities.

Administrators are not responsible for monitoring user activity or content on any network system. However, when they become aware of violations, either through the normal course of duty or by a complaint, it is their responsibility to refer the matter to the Dean of the College for investigation and possible discipline. To forestall an immediate threat to the security of a system or its users, system administrators may immediately suspend access of the people involved in the violation while the incident is being investigated.

They may also take other actions to preserve the state of files and other information relevant to an investigation. Specific personal electronic communications and computer files will not be searched deliberately to seek evidence of malfeasance except when the appropriate authorities feel it is necessary in order: to enforce policies regarding harassment and the safety of individuals; to prevent the posting of proprietary software or texts, images, or audio works in disregard of copyright restrictions or contractual obligations; to safeguard the integrity of computers, networks, and data either at the College or elsewhere; and to protect the College against seriously damaging consequences.

In general, electronic mail is considered the private information between the sender and recipient account holder. There may be exceptional circumstances where the College may release electronic mail to other parties. These situations may include, but are not limited to, the death of the account holder, when an absent or terminated employee has received mail associated with his/her job responsibilities, or during the course of a criminal investigation by authorized legal authorities.

The College recognizes that all network system users are bound by federal, state, and local laws relating to civil rights, harassment, copyright, pornography, privacy, security and other statutes relating to electronic media. Nothing in this policy should be interpreted as precluding enforcement of the laws and regulations of the United States of America, State of Maine or any locality in the State of Maine.

MyMECA Access Information
MyMECA gives you direct 24-hour access to your grades, course schedule, financial aid, tuition invoice, transcript, announcements and more. To access MyMECA for the first time, you must set-up your account password. https://docs.google.com/a/meca.edu/file/d/0BxvoTczjB-o2UF9MVmFGZUNPSXM/

Facilities Management Studio Guide

Facilities Management

Facilities, Porteous Building
207.699.5082

The college takes all practical steps to provide a safe and healthy working community, in compliance with federal, state and local laws. For example, each year, first year students participate in a mandatory safety training session. In addition, this studio safety guide provides an overview of some of the hazards connected with making art, as well as policies and guidelines on maintaining a safe studio practice. In addition, material safety data sheets (MSDS) are on file for materials used in each department. Ask your faculty, department technician, environmental coordinator (EC), or department chair where they are located. A central file of MSDS sheets is maintained in the Facilities office. If you have questions about materials you are using, read the MSDS for those materials. You are working with chemistry and materials that have the potential to be highly toxic and dangerous; it is your responsibility to be safe and to maintain a healthy studio environment.

Chemicals can enter the body through skin contact, ingestion through the mouth, and through inhalation. Skin contact and inhalation are the most common methods of entry. Our body has defensive barriers, but many art products contain acids, caustic alkaloids, peroxides, bleaches and organic solvents, any of which may cause deterioration of body defenses. Constant exposure can cause both severe short- and long-term damage. The breakdown of these defenses may occur immediately; or slowly, over an extended period of time.

Disruptions of the digestive system can occur when your hands, contaminated with art chemicals, come in contact with your mouth. This often occurs when food, cigarettes, or soft drinks are exposed to these chemicals in your studio. Eating and drinking is not permitted in the studios. All materials that have been removed from their original, labeled container need to be placed in a secondary container that is labeled.

Inhaling materials also contributes significantly to the disruption of your digestive and respiratory systems. Once inhaled, materials also find their way into your bloodstream. Some of these materials, such as glacial acetic acid (a “stop bath” in photography), welding fumes, wood dust, clay glazes, glass grinding materials and other noxious materials, can cause damage to your lungs and sensitive airway linings.

Prolonged and repeated exposures to chemicals can lead to chronic health problems. High-risk groups include smokers, heavy alcohol drinkers, and people with chronic diseases of the heart, lungs, kidney, and liver. Pregnant and lactating women are a very high-risk group because even small amounts of certain chemicals may damage a fetus or be transmitted through the milk to the nursing child. MSDS sheets provide important information about any health risks that may be associated with the use of particular products or materials.

When working in the studios, follow all “use-of-equipment” rules carefully. Students are not permitted to operate certain studio equipment without having first been trained and cleared by a college technician or instructor. Be especially attentive to rules and notices posted on the bulletin boards found in many studios and workshops. Important information on repairs, etc., may be found there. Important information may also be found on the equipment itself. Finally, follow the guidelines for all studios and those related to your particular field(s) of study.

Studio Safety Guide

Summary Environmental Management Plans
Summary environmental management plans (SEMP) have been written for the ceramics, metalsmithing & jewelry, painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture departments. Each SEMP is designed to be a guide for instructors, students and technicians on the environmental regulations that apply to each department. Additional information pertaining to environmental compliance is available in MECA’s Environmental Management Plan, which is located in the Facilities office.

Hazardous waste determinations have been done for all departments which identify waste streams and correct disposal methods. The plan also identifies the responsibilities (associated with environmental compliance) of the department’s technician, who is referred to as the department’s environmental coordinator. Environmental coordinators in these six departments assist the facilities director in overseeing each department’s operations to ensure they are in compliance with local, state and federal environmental regulations. Each department’s environmental coordinator relies on the students and instructors of each class to follow the guidelines listed in each SEMP. By following these guidelines, each department will maintain compliance with these regulations.

Chemical Spills
There are two types of spills, an “incidental spill” or one requiring an “emergency response.” An “incidental spill” is defined as a spill where a person is knowledgeable with the material and the amount spilled is small and easily cleaned up with materials in the spill kit. The type of response and necessary precautions that should be taken for an “incidental spill” is reviewed with each student during the annual hazard communication training, which explains the types of spills that can be or should not be handled by students. Students should notify the instructor or department technician when a spill occurs to find out how to dispose of the spilled chemical and clean up debris.

If the student is in doubt as to the classification of a spill, they should notify the instructor, technician or facilities director immediately. Always err on the side of caution. Students should never place themselves in harm’s way.

All other spills are considered to require an “emergency response.” “Emergency response” spills are releases of chemicals of such magnitude and risk that they are considered out of control and extend beyond the current training of the students, college personnel or facilities director to respond to effectively. They may also be spills that are released down a drain. All emergency spills should be immediately reported to the instructor, department technician or Facilities Director.

Guidelines for All Studios

  • There is no eating and drinking in the studios. Violations may jeopardize a student’s use of studio space.
  • Do not expose food or beverages to art materials, or use containers for both food and art material storage.
  • Keep your area/studio clean. Studios are to be kept in good order. Solvent, flammable and corrosive material containers are to be kept covered at all times and stored in appropriate cabinets or lockers when not in use.
  • All materials must be labeled and stored safely.
  • All waste solvents and other waste chemicals are to be disposed according to the department’s SEMP.
  • Rags contaminated with chemicals are to be thrown away only in the designated rag disposal containers provided.
  • Do not mix chemical waste with trash.
  • Never pour chemicals down the drain!
  • Label chemicals properly. Any chemical that has been transferred from its manufacturer’s container must be labeled using an HMIS label with the name of the material and the appropriate hazard warnings. Department technicians can provide labels and assist you in filling in the information. If you cannot immediately obtain an HMIS label, a temporary label may be made using a felt tip pen or marker.
  • Use proper ventilation. This is not only for your protection but to protect the air quality of those around you. If you are not sure what constitutes proper ventilation in any given situation, ask your faculty or a member of facilities.
  • Use approved materials only. The use of any chemical/industrial materials not supplied by the college is prohibited unless prior approval has been obtained from your instructor(s) or the departmental EC.
  • Ask for help. Be sure to check with the technician or instructor if you are unsure of any procedure. Immediately report any problem or unsafe condition to the technician or instructor.
  • Be sure to follow all guidelines for using personal protective equipment such as eye protection, earplugs, etc. for the studio you are working in.

Ceramics
Some clay dusts and glazes are toxic. Dusts such as silica and talc are listed as carcinogens and can cause disabling, lung-scarring and sometimes fatal diseases. Some glazes also contain toxic metal compounds. Symptoms may take years to develop and may promote susceptibility to other diseases. During kiln ring, toxic fumes and gases are produced. These can include carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and chlorine released from the clay or glazes. All gas or electric kilns are located in well-ventilated areas. Safety in the ceramics studio consists of avoiding exposure to dangerous chemicals, dust and safety around kilns and moving parts. Because everyone’s body is unique, even officially tolerable levels of a material may be intolerable for you. Pay attention to the early signals your body sends: if you develop a rash, nausea or dizziness, stop what you are doing and take a break. See the chart of hazardous compounds at the back of the studio safety guide for more information.

Safety Rules for the Ceramics Area

  • Keep work areas clean. Cluttered areas invite accidents.
  • Clean up wet glaze spills before they dry.
  • Avoid procedures that produce dust. Keep materials wet. Work with pre-mixed clay (when possible).
  • Wear proper apparel such as coveralls or a jumpsuit over your regular clothing.
  • Do not wear loose clothing, rings, bracelets etc. that can get caught in moving parts (such as a potter’s wheel). Non-slip footwear is recommended.
  • Protect your face and eyes. Use goggles during mixing, chipping and grinding.
  • Rubber gloves must be worn when mixing or using glazes in the glaze lab.
  • Only the procedures outlined in the departmental SEMP are to be used to mix glazes. These have been designed for your health and safety, and to comply with USEPA and MEDEP regulations.
  • Electrically ground all equipment. If equipment has a three-prong plug, it should be plugged into a three-slot receptacle. If an adapter is used to accommodate a two-slot receptacle, the adapter must be attached to the receptacle’s faceplate. Never remove the third prong of a plug.
  • Use the process ventilator in the glaze lab and clay mixing areas. Always ensure that the space you are working in is well ventilated.
  • Materials and belongings must be stored above floor level so that all floors can be regularly and thoroughly cleaned.
  • No dry sweeping is allowed in the ceramics area. Wet mopping or wet vacuuming is the only way to clean floors.
  • No eating, drinking or smoking is allowed in the ceramic areas.
  • Learn about the chemistry of the materials with which you are working by reading labels, charts and the material safety data sheets (MSDS).

Personal Safety Around Kilns

  • Loose clothing and hair can easily catch fire.
  • Use only the specifically designated kilns for raku firing or other processes that generate visible smoke. This will prevent false fire alarms.
  • Assume anything on or around a kiln is hot.
  • Keep your face and hands back from spy ports.
  • Be careful looking into a yellow-hot kiln. The radiation may damage your eyes and even some types of glasses. Ultraviolet and infrared rated safety glasses are a good idea for everyone, and they make the parametric cones easier to see.
  • If you are exposed to excessive heat for long periods, leave the kiln studio every so often, drink lots of liquids and eat a bit of high-energy food.
  • A kiln with a reduction atmosphere produces some carbon monoxide.
  • If you start to feel dizzy, get out of the kiln room and seek medical help immediately.
  • Alcohol, drugs and medication impair control of the ring and clear thinking in case of a problem or emergency.
  • All participants in raku firings must wear fire-resistant clothing.

Kiln Safety

  • Check the structural condition of the kiln before any firing. Report any problems to the instructor or technician.
  • Clean the kiln before and after the firing.
  • Make sure the stacking of ware is stable and level.
  • Do not leave combustible materials anywhere near the kilns.
  • Only students who have been authorized by an instructor may sign up for and fire kilns.
  • Never touch controls or make adjustments to kilns that you are not firing.
  • Exhaust fans must be turned on during all firings.
  • Kiln shelves and stilts must be returned to proper storage.
  • Goggles must be worn when chipping and washing kiln shelves. Use process ventilation.

Graphic Design and Digital Media
Hazards in graphic design and digital media are primarily the result of long hours at a computer terminal. Studies show that repetitive motion (like typing, using a mouse, etc.) can cause physical disorders like carpal tunnel syndrome, etc. Additionally, long hours at the computer also cause problems with posture, etc. Tests are not conclusive about the long-term exposure to monitors, etc., but if your eyes or anything else gets sore the best plan is to take a break!

Safety Rules for Graphic Design and Digital Media

  • Keep your work area clean: cluttered areas and benches invite accidents.
  • Use toxic materials like spray mount or spray fixative only in a designated spray-booth in the Porteous building.
  • Check your workstation and be sure that it is ergonomically correct—your shoulders should not be hunched up while working on a keyboard, your back should be straight and your head in a comfortable position.
  • Take time every half-hour or so to do some basic arm, hand, shoulder and neck stretches.

Care & Operation of Equipment

  • Do not spill liquids, etc. on or near any of the computer terminals.
  • If something is not working let the technology support staff know right away.
  • Follow instructions posted near machines for proper steps to turn equipment on or off.
  • When in doubt ask someone in technology or your faculty.

Metalsmithing & Jewelry
Metalsmithing, jewelry and enameling use a broad range of processes and materials, which can be potentially harmful. For example, cutting, ling, and sanding can create dusts; soldering, brazing, enameling, and melting metal create toxic fumes. The infrared light from these processes can also be a threat to vision. Repetitive hammering required for metalsmithing can be a serious threat to hearing, as well as the potential cause of repetitive motion disorders. Corrosives for cleaning, etching, and patination must be handled with extreme caution.

Safety in the metals studio consists of understanding and respecting the machines, avoiding dangerous materials and processes, and protecting oneself from invasion by particles, fumes or sharp objects. Because everyone’s body is unique, even of officially tolerable levels of a material may be intolerable for you. Pay attention to the early signals your body sends: if you have a dry mouth, an odd taste, a rash, nausea or dizziness, stop what you are doing and take a break. See the chart of hazardous compounds at the back of the studio safety guide for more information.

Safety rules for Metals

  • Keep your work area clean: cluttered areas and benches invite accidents.
  • Do not work by yourself. Have someone else with you at all times in the studio or shop.
  • Wear proper apparel. Do not wear loose clothing, gloves, necklaces, rings, bracelets or other jewelry that may get caught in moving parts.
  • Bare feet are not allowed in anystudio or shop. Sandals, open-toe shoes, or high heels should not be worn. Non-slip safety shoes are recommended.
  • All hair longer than shoulder length must be tied back and away from the face at all times.
  • Always use safety glasses.
  • No machines or tools should be used prior to instruction from faculty member.
  • A dust mask must be worn whenever grinding, sanding, cutting or for any activity that produces particulate matter. Use proper ventilation where toxic fumes may be generated.
  • Use hearing protection when around loud machinery or processes.
  • Do not work or operate tools while under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or medication.
  • Don’t use power tools in damp or wet locations or expose them to rain. Keep your work area well lit.
  • Keep children and visitors out of work areas.
  • Report any problems with tools immediately to the faculty or technician. Do not repair tools or replace blades, bits, etc., unless you have been authorized and trained by the faculty or technician.
  • Make your workshop tamper-proof (and childproof at home) with padlocks, master switches, and by removing starter keys.
  • Return all tools to designated storerooms or tool rooms.

Care & Operation of Equipment:

  • Do not operate any tools or equipment without prior instruction from faculty or technicians.
  • Use the right tool. Don’t force a tool or attachment to do a job for which it was not designed.
  • Read the instruction manual before operating a tool.
  • Electrically ground all tools where required. If a tool is equipped with a three-prong plug, it should be plugged into a three-slot electrical receptacle.
  • Remove adjusting keys and wrenches before operating equipment. They can become lethal projectiles.
  • Maintain tools in top condition. Keep tools sharp and clean for safe performance.
  • Follow instructions for lubricating and changing accessories.
  • Avoid accidental starting. Make sure switch is in the “off” position before plugging in the power cord. Do not use equipment that is tagged or labeled as inoperative or under repair.
  • Never stand on a tool. Serious injury may occur if the tool is tipped or if the cutting edge is accidentally contacted.
  • Feed work into a blade or cutter only against the direction of rotation of the blade or cutter.
  • Secure your work. Use clamps or a vise to hold your work. This is safer than using your hand and leaves both hands free to operate the tool.
  • Don’t overreach. Keep proper footing and balance at all times.
  • Never leave a tool running unattended. Turn off the power. Don’t leave a tool until it comes to a complete stop.
  • Disconnect tools before servicing or when changing accessories such as blades, bits, t-cutters, or while a motor is being mounted or repaired.

Painting
There are significant health hazards connected with the use of pigments as well as the use of chemical thinners, solvents, etc. Even ready-to-use paints can be dangerous to handle and precautions need to be taken. Safety in the painting studio consists of avoiding exposure to dangerous chemicals and processes and maintaining good housekeeping. Every attempt should be made to properly discard combustibles, such as newspapers, paper, trash, solvent-contaminated rags, etc. Combustibles in the presence of flammable solvents and paints can result in personal injury. Because everyone’s body is unique, even of officially tolerable levels of a material may be intolerable for you. Pay attention to the early signals your body sends: if you develop a rash, nausea or dizziness, stop what you are doing and take a break. See the chart of hazardous compounds at the back of the studio safety guide for more information.

Safety Rules for Painting Studios

  • Use gloves when handling varnishes, lacquers, thinners and epoxy resins.
  • Disposable latex gloves are good for working with paints of low toxicity. Highly toxic paints (such as those containing chromium, lead, cadmium and zinc) should be used with caution, adequate personal protection, and under circumstances approved by the instructor.
  • Spray paints and fixatives are to be used only in designated spray booths, and with proper ventilation.
  • No heaters, hot plates, or open flames of any kind are allowed in the studios.
  • No melting of waxes of any kind.
  • No storage of flammable materials such as: hay, newspaper, oily rags, etc.
  • No pastels or chalks may be used in any elective classroom. Pastels may only be used in major’s studios while wearing a dust mask, and only with the express permission of the major instructor and with the consent of the students working nearby.
  • Odorless paint thinner or odorless mineral spirits are the only solvents that may be used to thin paint or to clean painting materials. Other solvents such as ‘Citrisolve’, ‘Turpenoid’, turpentine, lacquer thinner and plain (not odorless) mineral spirits are not allowed in any studio.
  • The largest container of odorless mineral spirits allowed in 2D studios is 1 pint.
  • All unused solvent or medium containers must be made of plastic or metal, clearly labeled as to exact content, and stored in a container with a tightly closing top. All paint and solvent containers should be tightly closed when not being used. Unlabeled or improper containers may be removed by the EC.
  • Use the smallest amount possible of any solvent.
  • Do not use solvents to clean your hands. Wear barrier cream or gloves when working and follow this with soap and water. Use solvent resistant gloves wherever possible.
  • Use the mildest solvent that will do the job for thinning paints and cleaning brushes.
  • For example, baby oil or mineral oil may be used to clean brushes. Higher-flashpoint solvents such as Gamsol or odorless mineral spirits are good choices of solvents.
  • Carefully washing your hands after using these materials is crucial to ensuring that hazardous materials connected with them are not inhaled or accidentally ingested.
  • No sinks may be used to dispose of painting wastes. Solvent or media waste is to be disposed of in marked drums only.
  • No painting rags or trash is permitted to accumulate in the studio space. This presents a life/health/safety issue to yourself as well as others and in addition is a violation of federal, state, and local laws that can result in financial penalties to the college and or shutdown of the department until, violations are corrected. Criminal charges can be brought, particularly in cases of willful negligence.
  • No breakable glass containers may be used to store solvents or mediums.
  • Cover all palettes that contain paint unless you are using them.
  • Always make sure that there is ample ventilation.
  • Leave at least 18’ from the bottom of curtains to the floor.
  • Most solvents are flammable – be sure that you are familiar with the location of your studio re-extinguisher. All re-extinguishers are mounted and identified with signs.

Photography
Prolonged and repeated exposures to photographic chemicals, as with any chemical sub-stance, can lead to chronic health problems. Many of the chemicals used in photographic processing can cause severe skin problems, and in some cases, lung disease. The greatest hazard occurs during the preparation and handling of concentrated stock solutions and chemicals. Developers are highly toxic and are taken in by ingestion and absorption. Remember, not all chemicals have distinctive odors or emit a readily detectable vapor. Safety in the photography darkroom and studio consists of avoiding exposure to dangerous chemicals and practicing safety around equipment. Because everyone’s body is unique, even of officially tolerable levels of a material may be intolerable for you. Pay attention to the early signals your body sends: if you develop a rash, nausea or dizziness, stop what you are doing and take a break. See the chart of hazardous compounds at the back of the studio safety guide for more information.

Safety Rules for the Photography Darkrooms

  • Use common sense. Pace yourself when working in the darkroom. Take frequent outside rest periods so that intense, prolonged exposure to any potentially toxic materials is reduced.
  • Protect yourself from chemical absorption through the skin. Never put your hands into photographic chemicals unless you are wearing the appropriate gloves.
  • Do not splash chemicals. Splashing is a common cause of eye contamination. Gently place prints into each solution to prevent splashing.
  • Wipe up all spills immediately to prevent people from slipping and falling and to prevent chemical exposures by inhalation.
  • If you are mixing chemicals from powders or liquid concentrates, or if you are toning, you must wear safety goggles. When mixing acids with water, always add the acid to water, never the reverse. When water is added to concentrated acids (such as glacial acetic acid used to mix a stop bath) a violent reaction may occur causing the mixture to boil and splatter about the room.
  • If you do get chemicals in your eyes, flush them with a gentle, constant flow of water for at least fifteen (15) minutes. Report the accident immediately and seek medical attention as quickly as possible after flushing the eyes.
  • Be sure that waste chemicals are discarded into the correct containers.
  • It is mandatory that disposal information (posted on bulletin boards) and label instructions be followed exactly. Failure to follow instructions could result in a serious violation of state and federal environmental regulations. If you do not know exactly what to do, consult the technician before discarding any photographic waste.
  • Wear an acid-proof apron when working in the studio. Protect your face, eyes and hands when any chemical is used.
  • Process and mix only in approved spaces.

Photography studio safety:

  • Never eat, drink or smoke in the studio.
  • Do not overload individual electrical circuits.
  • Secure the camera to a tripod.
  • Avoid overcrowding the studio area with people or objects.
  • Use appropriate heat resistant gloves when using studio lights.
  • Keep all cables clear of foot traffic and gaff them down.
  • Avoid long shoots using an excessive number of lights.
  • Secure light stands and tripod legs with sandbags where needed.
  • Never move a light while it is turned on.
  • Be careful when moving freestanding lights, as they are top-heavy.
  • Avoid lifting heavy equipment without assistance.

Safety Rules for Portable Lights:

  • Do not use attachments that are not recommended by the equipment manufacturer.
  • Do not use electrical or electronic equipment near water: for example, near a sink, or laundry tub, in a wet basement, or near a swimming pool, etc.
  • Don’t place equipment on an unstable cart, stand, or table.
  • Slots and openings in electronic equipment are provided for ventilation. These openings must not be blocked or covered. Do not place the equipment on a bed, sofa, rug, etc. or on or over a radiator or heat source.
  • Never push objects of any kind into the equipment’s ventilation slots as they may touch dangerous voltage points or short out parts. This could result in re or electric shock.
  • Never spill liquid of any kind on the equipment.
  • The equipment should be operated only from the type of power source indicated on its label.
  • Most equipment is equipped with a 3-wire grounding type plug (a plug having a third, grounding pin). This plug will only fit into a grounding type outlet. This is a safety feature. Do not defeat the safety purpose of the 3-wire plug by removing the grounding pin.
  • Do not crush, or walk on, the equipment’s power cord. Do not locate equipment where the cord will be abused, such as in doorways or high traffic areas.
  • Follow all warnings and instructions marked on the equipment. Do not overload wall outlets and extension cords as this can result in re or electric shock.
  • Do not attempt to service the equipment yourself, as opening or removing covers may expose you to dangerous voltage or other hazards.
  • Unplug the equipment from the wall outlet and bring it to the technician immediately if it is not working properly.
  • Do not attempt to lift heavy equipment by yourself.
  • Turn the power switch off before plugging or unplugging a piece of equipment.
  • Keep equipment off the ground, if possible, to prevent accidental tripping.
  • Never eat or drink around equipment.

Printmaking
The various chemicals, solvents and inks used in printmaking processes can present various health hazards. For example, aromatic hydrocarbons and other lacquer solvents must be used with adequate ventilation. Inks (black and white) usually contain carbon black, which may cause skin cancer years later. Common toxic pigments may include chrome yellow (lead chromate), zinc yellow (zinc chromate), milori green (lead chromate), and cadmium colors. Most solvents used in printmaking are skin irritants. Commonly used powders including magnesium carbonate, citric acid powder, French chalk etc. May cause skin and/or respiratory problems. There may also be exposure to lacquer thinner, alcohol and acids. Although these materials are used in relatively small amounts they are potentially dangerous if used incorrectly. Hazards in silk-screening are minimized at MECA because only water-based inks are used. However, there are toxic materials contained in photo-emulsion and emulsion removers. Also, advanced silkscreen classes utilize photo chemicals such as developers, stop bath and fixers. (see the chart of hazardous compounds at the back of this safety guide for more particular information about working with or avoiding chemical compounds.) Safety in the printmaking studio consists of avoiding exposure to these various chemicals and processes. Because everyone’s body is unique, even of officially tolerable levels of a material may be intolerable for you. Pay attention to the early signals your body sends: if you develop a rash, nausea or dizziness, stop what you are doing and take a break. Remember, not all chemicals have distinctive odors or emit a readily detectable vapor. See the chart of hazardous compounds at the back of the studio safety guide for more information.

Safety Rules for Printmaking Studios:

  • Use gloves when handling chemicals such as gum arabic, tannic plate etch, citric plate etches, cellulose gum, micro-gum prosol and image remover.
  • Be careful when working with acid! Goggles, face-shields, aprons, and gloves should always be worn! One rule to always follow: always add acid to water, never the re- verse. (Treatment for exposure to acid is to flush clear water on the affected eyes, skin or clothing for a minimum of 15 minutes, followed immediately with medical attention by a doctor of a nurse.)
  • Chemical powders are a hazard and may require the use of a dust mask. Be respectful of the breathing space of others when using these powders: keep them localized to the task.
  • The lithography chemical, lacquer base, requires or application of plate or stone must be done at a designated process ventilation area.
  • Trays in the acid hoods must be kept covered to prevent unneeded exposure to fumes and reduce evaporation.
  • Spray paints and fixatives are to be used only in designated spray booths, and with proper ventilation.
  • Carefully washing your hands after using these materials is crucial to ensuring that hazardous materials connected with them are not inhaled or accidentally ingested.
  • Rags impregnated with ink or solvents may represent both a health and regulated hazard. Be sure they are discarded into the special reproof containers provided for this purpose.
  • No storage of flammable materials such as: hay, newspaper, oily rags, etc. No rags or trash may be allowed to accumulate in studios. No breakable glass containers may be used to store solvents or mediums.
  • All unused solvent or medium containers must be made of plastic or metal, clearly labeled as to exact contents, and stored in a container with a tightly closing top.
  • Most solvents are flammable — be sure that you are familiar with the location of your studio re extinguisher. All fire extinguishers are mounted and identified with signs.
  • Caution must be used in the operation of print equipment. For example, intaglio printing requires a great deal of pressure and it is necessary to operate the presses properly. Students must be alert and knowledgeable when operating print equipment and seek assistance when in doubt.
  • The printmaking studio is only available to beginning students when there is a monitor present who is trained in the proper use of equipment. Always seek assistance when necessary.

Sculpture, Woodworking and Furniture Design
Sculpture employs a vast range of materials and processes, from more ‘traditional’ materials like plaster, wood, stone, steel and bronze to plastics, resins, found objects and non-traditional materials including foodstuffs, clothing, waste materials, etc. Therefore, it is particularly important that you consider the safety or toxicity of the materials you may be using before bringing them into your studio. Certain materials used in sculpture have toxic properties. The hazards of silica and asbestos are well documented, and these substances are found in some stones and clays. Some metals, when heated, give off fumes that can cause fevers, headaches and nausea. When in doubt about the safety of any material, check with your faculty immediately. Sculptors must be very thorough in considering potential hazards connected with materials. For example, even ready-to-use lead paints are dangerous to handle
and precautions need to be taken such as wearing rubber gloves. Safety in the sculpture studios and woodshop consists of avoiding exposure to dangerous chemicals, airborne debris and practicing safety around equipment. Because everyone’s body is unique, even officially tolerable levels of a material may be intolerable for you. Pay attention to the early signals your body sends: if you develop a rash, nausea or dizziness, stop what you are doing and take a break. See the chart of hazardous compounds at the back of the studio safety guide for more information; listed below are some broad categories of materials and general hazards related to each.

Acids/Patinas
One of the greatest hazards in bronze patina is the use of acid, which can cause severe skin burns. Eye damage from splashed acid can also be dangerous. One rule to always follow: always add acid to water, never the reverse. Treatment for exposure to acid is to flush clear water on the affected eyes, skin or clothing for a minimum of 15 minutes, followed immediately with medical attention by a doctor or nurse.
Chemicals/Solvents
Solvents are used to dissolve and mix oils, resins, and varnishes and to clean brushes, etc. Almost all solvents are poisonous if swallowed or inhaled in sufficient quantity. Similar properties exist among many different solvents. If one member of a class of solvents
is toxic, usually another safer solvent can be used. Remember: water is the preferred universal solvent. Solvent-saturated rags can also result in spontaneous combustion and must be air-dried (with good ventilation present) and not stored wet. Prior to using any solvent, review its MSDS, and read the precautions and warning labels on the container. Familiarize yourself with the side-effects that could result from long-term or short-term overexposure to the properties of that solvent. Wear proper gloves, eye protection and a respirator with the appropriate cartridge and always use paints, glues, etc. in a designated spray booth.

Dusts
Dusts such as silica, asbestos and talc are listed as carcinogens and can cause disabling, lung-scarring and even fatal disease. Dust is created during the carving of plaster, wood, stone, etc. and is also present during various mold-making processes such as lost-wax investment. Symptoms may take years to develop and may promote susceptibility to other diseases. Follow studio procedures and wear appropriate personal protection equipment, especially gloves, when working with clay and toxic materials.

Fibers
Most of the hazards with fiber come from dust. Cotton, flax and hemp dusts can
cause lung ailments years after exposure. Hazards in dyeing come from both the dyes and mordants, as well as from other dyeing assistants. Direct dyes for cotton, linen and rayon are often made from benzene-type derivatives. Fiber reactives or cold water dyes can cause severe respiratory allergies. Inhalation of these materials can also cause serious damage to the nasal passages and respiratory system. Using proper ventilation greatly reduces the risks. Properly storing materials after each use will eliminate the hazards connected with exposed or unattended raw ber materials.

Glass
When working with glass, your personal safety needs to be considered. Dust is also of significant concern when grinding, etc. Proper ventilation, sturdy gloves and safety glasses are essential.

Glue, Paint, and Finish
Gluing, painting and finishing may be part of the sculpture-making process and include possible exposure to solvents and chemicals. Wear proper gloves, eye protection and a respirator with the appropriate cartridge and always use paints, glues, etc. in a designated spray booth.

Metal and Casting
Both the materials and the environment for metalworking can be hazardous. Hazards include dusts formed while grinding or polishing, fumes from welding or soldering, or vapors from casting, plating or cleaning. Any abrasive process, such as grinding or using a wire brush, can produce airborne debris that can damage the eyes and lungs. Welding, brazing and soldering can produce lead and other metallic fumes. Polystyrene produces toxic smoke and fumes if used improperly during “lost wax” casting. Pickling solutions are caustic and most cleaning solvents are toxic to some degree. Additional hazards of metalworking arise from the use of a wide variety of tools and machinery, from simple hand tools to the overhead hoist, lathes, etc. Virtually every accident (or “close call”) is the result of inattention or improper use of the machinery and tools. Fire hazards are also present: propane gas cylinders are especially insidious because they are so common that it is easy to forget they contain flammable gas under pressure. Finally, in the casting process, metal is melted and poured into a suitable negative mold. The fumes of many of these metals and alloys are toxic. This is especially true of the lead found in brass and pewter. In addition, lead is sometimes added to molten bronze. Inhalation of these fumes can cause lead poisoning. The sand used in the shell-molding process has a high silica content and the dust should not be inhaled. In the lost wax process, the fire-resistant plaster or clay used as a negative mold contains many additives that are hazardous. These include solvents, acids and silica our, which can cause rapidly developing silicosis. A major concern in casting is exposure to intense heat. Safety glasses, welder’s helmets, high temperature clothing and similar specialized items are provided by the college and must be used where required by the instructor. It is highly recommended that each student purchase an approved pair of safety shoes.

Wax Fumes
When melted, wax emits organic vapors. In petroleum-based waxes this vapor can cause lung damage and asthma. This is less true for paraffin and beeswax, which tend to have less toxic organic vapors. Use a good respirator with cartridges for organic vapors.
Wood
Working with wood presents various hazards from issues of safety around machinery (table saws, etc), to toxic dusts and ying debris put off during sanding. Some woods themselves are highly toxic, especially exotic woods. Check with your faculty if you are uncertain and always wear proper protection and handle machinery with care.

Safety Rules for Sculpture & Woodshop

  • Keep your work area and studio space clean and organized: cluttered areas invite accidents and violate federal, state, and local life/health/safety codes. Said violations may result in financial penalties and department shutdown until violations are corrected.
  • Do not work by yourself. Have someone else with you at all times in the studio or shop.
  • Wear proper apparel. Do not wear loose clothing, gloves, necklaces, rings, bracelets or other jewelry that may get caught in moving parts. Bare feet are not allowed in any studio or shop. Sandals, open-toe shoes, or high heels should not be worn. Non-slip safety shoes are recommended.
  • Wear protective hair covering to contain long hair.
  • Always use safety glasses.
  • Use a dust mask if a cutting operation is dusty.
  • Use proper ventilation where toxic fumes may be generated.
  • Use hearing protection when around loud machinery or processes.
  • Do not work or operate tools while under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or medication.
  • Don’t use power tools in damp or wet locations or expose them to rain.
  • Keep your work area well lighted.
  • Keep children and visitors out of work areas.
  • Report any problems with tools immediately to the faculty or technician. Do not repair tools or replace blades, bits, etc., unless you have been authorized and trained by the faculty or technician.
  • Make your workshop tamper-proof (and childproof at home) with padlocks, master switches, and by removing starter keys.
  • Return all tools to designated storerooms or tool rooms.

Care & Operation of Equipment

  • Do not operate any tools or equipment without prior instruction from faculty or technicians.
  • Use the right tool. Don’t force a tool or attachment to do a job for which it was not designed.
  • Read the instruction manual before operating a tool.
  • Electrically ground all tools where required. If a tool is equipped with a three-prong plug, it should be plugged into a three-slot electrical receptacle.
  • Remove adjusting keys and wrenches before operating equipment. They can be-come lethal projectiles.
  • Maintain tools in top condition. Keep tools sharp and clean for safe performance. Follow instructions for lubricating and changing accessories.
  • Avoid accidental starting. Make sure switch is in the “off” position before plugging in the power cord. Do not use equipment that is tagged or labeled as inoperative or under repair.
  • Never stand on a tool. Serious injury may occur if the tool is tipped or if the cutting edge is accidentally contacted.
  • Feed work into a blade or cutter only against the direction of rotation of the blade or cutter.
  • Secure your work. Use clamps or a vise to hold your work. This is safer than using your hand and leaves both hands free to operate the tool.
  • Don’t overreach. Keep proper footing and balance at all times.
  • Never leave a tool running unattended. Turn off the power. Don’t leave a tool until it comes to a complete stop.
  • Disconnect tools before servicing or when changing accessories such as blades, bits, cutters, or while a motor is being mounted or repaired.

Chart of Hazardous Compounds
Acetone
Headache, drowsiness, irritation. This is one of the least toxic solvents. Precautions: adequate ventilation, extremely flammable.

Acetylene
Mild narcotic in small doses, large doses cut off oxygen. Precautions: use caution and check equipment for leaks.

Aerosol sprays
Fine mists containing possible toxic materials can travel long distances or remain suspended in the air for long periods before settling, commonly flammable and toxic. Precautions: spray booths must be used. Be sure to direct spray away from anyone’s breathing space. Store cans away from fire, at a temperature that does not exceed 120°f. Empty cans should be disposed of in the trash promptly. Use non-aerosol products if available.

Ammonia
Irritant to the eyes, caustic to lungs, serious when in strong solution. Precautions: use diluted soap and water.

Aqua Regia
Most caustic of all acids. Precautions: wear protective clothing. Store in a well marked loosely stoppered bottle.

Asbestos
Made up of fibers the body cannot dissolve. This product is a carcinogen whose effects can take 20-30 years to develop. Precautions: do not use! – use substitutes.

Benzene
Intoxication, coma, respiratory failure. Precautions: do not use: carcinogen; cumulative poison by all methods of entry; use an alternate solvent.

Cadmium
Affects brain, nervous system, lungs, kidneys. Precautions: avoid if possible and use only with strong ventilation.

Chlorinated hydrocarbons
Dissolves the fatty layer of the skin. Causes liver and kidney damage. Precautions: avoid if possible. Ventilate. Wear neoprene rubber gloves.

Copper oxides
Can irritate lungs, intestines, eyes and skin. Precautions: ventilate when heating copper alloys. Wear gloves when handling a lot.
Cyanides
Mists inhaled or falling on skin are poisonous. Precautions: ventilate well; wear protective clothing.

Fluorides
Can form hydrofluoric acid in the lungs. Precautions: ventilate, avoid breathing fumes.

Lead
Damages brain, central nervous system, red blood cells, marrow, liver, kidneys. Fumes are especially dangerous. Precautions: avoid if possible. Ventilate well, minimize handling and wash well after contact.

Ketones
Skin, eye and respiratory tract irritants. Can cause peripheral nerve damage. Precautions: ventilate very well; wear rubber gloves.

Liver of Sulfur
When heated to decomposition, it can create hydrogen sulfide, a source of brain damage and suffocation. Precautions: do not allow mixture to come to a boil.

Mercury
Damages brain, nervous system and kidneys. Precautions: avoid fumes and skin contact. Ventilate very well and wear protective clothing.

Polyester resins
Skin irritants. Some release toxic fumes when mixed with their binders; some are explosive.
Precautions: wear gloves and ventilate. Store according to directions.

Silver compounds
Absorbed into the skin as vapor or dust, can cause night blindness. Precautions: wear gloves and ventilate well.

Sulfuric acid & Sparex (sodium bisulfate)
Irritates skin and respiratory tract. Damages clothing. Precautions: ventilate. Keep container covered. Neutralize with a solution of baking soda and water.

Tellurium
Fumes generated in refining gold, silver, copper and in welding. Irritates skin and gastrointestinal system. Precautions: ventilate. Early symptom is ‘garlic breath’ and a metallic taste in the mouth. Be alert for this.

Toluene & Toluol
Causes hallucination, possible liver and kidney failure, intoxication, lung, brain and red blood cell damage. Precautions: avoid if possible. Ventilate well – inhalation can cause death.

Turpentine
Skin irritant, brain and lung damage possible. Precautions: ventilate well and Wear gloves. Do not ingest as may be fatal.

Zinc compounds
Dust and fumes attack the central nervous system, skin and lungs. Precautions: ventilate well.

Waste Management Procedures
College policy and procedure complies with federal, state and municipal regulations regarding hazardous waste disposal. These procedures are outlined below. Any questions should be directed to the Director of Facilities.

There are three categories of wastes that require special handling at MECA:
Hazardous waste — as defined by Federal and Maine law
Universal waste — as defined by Federal and Maine law
Prohibited wastewater — waste which may not be poured down drains, according to MECA’s wastewater discharge permit. Pouring prohibited wastewater down sink drains can result in significant fines and, more importantly, can cause serious injury to workers of the city of Portland’s wastewater treatment plant.

The wastes generated by each department’s routine operations have been identified in the
SEMP and the department’s technician can direct you to proper disposal methods. Occasionally, you may have a waste, which is not addressed by the SEMP. These may be wastes generated by new products or methods or simply leftover product you don’t want to keep. Your department’s technician, and/or the facilities department, can assist you in determining the proper disposal method.

Make every attempt to properly label every container. Improper disposal of a hazardous waste or prohibited wastewater can result in fines, environmental damage, or worse, serious safety consequences.

You are responsible for products you bring to MECA. Do not leave any unused products at MECA without arranging for their use or disposal. You may give unwanted, but still usable, products directly to another student. You may not abandon products or wastes at MECA without permission from your department’s technician or the facilities department.

Additional Safety Considerations:
5th Floor Spray Booth: this facility must be maintained in a clean and uncluttered condition. Rules are posted. Violations will result in the ventilation being shut down until corrections are made. The Departmental EC, the Facilities Director and an environmental firm will conduct periodic inspections.

Violations will be noted and brought to the attention of the individual(s) involved and their department. Recommendations will be provided to help resolve violations. All violations will be considered a serious matter as they potentially affect your health and safety as well as others around you. In addition violations of departmental SEMPS violate federal, state, and local laws and can result in: Financial penalties, Departmental or institution shutdown , and possibly criminal charges based on willful negligence.

Porteous Visitor Policy

The Porteous Visitor Policy is in place to enhance the safety and security of everyone who uses the Porteous building.

Visitor is defined as anyone who is not a member of the staff, faculty or student body of MECA.

Visiting Hours
Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 8:00 pm
Saturday and Sunday, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
Visitors are not permitted access to Porteous outside of these hours

Sign-in/Sign-out Procedures

  • ALL visitors MUST sign in at the reception desk. They may be requested to show I.D. should security not know them.
  • ALL visitors will be issued a badge: blue for Library and yellow to visit other non-public areas of the building.
  • Visitors to first floor galleries are not required to sign-in or wear a badge.
  • Visitors who desire access to any non-public area of the building must be met at the reception desk by an employee or student of the college. This person will serve as escort, is responsible for signing the visitor in and remaining with them until they leave the building.

Visitors are not permitted to use the facilities and equipment of the college unless specific approval has been given by a staff member. In order to avoid misunderstandings in this area, that approval must be communicated to Doug Doering, Director of Facilities Department, and to personnel at the reception desk. Visitors in the building without an escort or using the facilities without approval will be asked to leave until such time as they are able to satisfy the above criteria.

Class models must identify themselves as such; sign in and show I.D. if requested. They do not need a badge or escort. EVERYONE entering the building after the doors are locked must sign in and show I.D. if requested. Please do not take this request to show I.D. personally.

Summer Note: BFA students are not permitted in the building unless they are a student, tech or instructor in a summer course, or are working for a department. They are permitted to visit the Library and galleries.

Department heads running summer programs are responsible for providing the Facilities Department and the reception desk with personnel lists.

Questions may be directed to Doug Doering, Director of Facilities department.

MECA Tobacco-Free & Smoke-Free Campus Policy

Background:
Maine College of Art is committed to providing a healthy learning and work environment. There is considerable evidence that smoke is harmful not only to smokers but also to non-smokers. Every student, employee, contractor/vendor, and visitor should be able to breathe clean air, as well as the right to avoid exposure to the effects of smoke and tobacco. MECA therefore established the following Tobacco-Free and Smoke-Free Policy.

Policy Statement:
MECA is a Tobacco-Free and Smoke-Free Campus. This policy applies to all faculty, staff, students, contractors, vendors, and visitors. The use of tobacco and all tobacco products including non-FDA approved nicotine delivery devices, such as electronic cigarettes is not permitted in any MECA owned or leased property or vehicles or within 20’ of any building entrance, loading dock, or ventilation system.

Responsibilities:
It is the shared responsibility of all members of the campus community to respect and abide by the policy.

Administrators, deans, directors, supervisors, and event sponsors will communicate the policy within their areas of responsibility.

MECA will provide access to tobacco cessation resources to MECA students and employees.

Implementation:
The successful implementation of this policy depends on the courtesy and cooperation of the entire MECA community.

Signs will be posted at all buildings’ entrances and displayed in prominent, visible areas to inform all individuals entering or occupying MECA property that the use of tobacco products are prohibited

The policy will be communicated in appropriate college publications and contracts. MECA publications include but are not limited to electronic notifications, handbooks, brochures, and other college generated material.