BFA Course Schedule: Fall 2020

BFA Course Schedule: Spring 2021

    Code
    Course
    Credits
    PR 100

    PR 100 Intro to Printmaking Techniques

    This studio course is an introduction to a variety of printmaking processes including collagraph, xerox lithography, and drypoint. The class focuses on learning basic printmaking techniques and developing elements of design and concept. Students will investigate the complex and varied roles of printed art in terms of technique, concept, format and function. Class assignments utilize the inherent characteristics of printed art forms; repetition, permutation, appropriation, and public accessibility, as a means to expand formal and material language, develop personal imagery, and experience new studio processes. Students will gain familiarity with safe and professional printmaking practices and develop a language for printmaking critique. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week. No prerequisite.

    No Prerequisites

    3 credits
    PR 133

    PR 133 (AE) Silkscreen: Making Multiples and Marketing Methods

    Screenprint allows rapid, agile application of images to widely varying surfaces, including paper, plastic, canvas, fabric, and wood. Its technical versatility makes it an essential point of exchange in the free flowing traffic of images and ideas across disciplines. This course provides a technical introduction to the medium, including the study of color, design, and transparency and layering. Assignments will introduce materials and methods best suited to fast and cheap dissemination as well as limited edition fine art printing. Students will learn painterly, drawn, hand cut, photographic and digital methods to create prints. Directed projects and readings will highlight how artists have used screenprint as a distinct art form and profitable way to approach the marketplace. Contemporary and historical examples of creative entrepreneurship will be introduced. Students will apply knowledge to design, produce and disseminate artwork and/or complementary items that highlight, promote and/or package artworks, functional objects, and other creative endeavors, highlighting aspects of their work such as aesthetics, material makeup, sustainability, and identity of the maker/designer. This highly individualized course will benefit students focusing on one or more of the following: fine art, design, craft, political activism, and entrepreneurship in other fields. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week. No prerequisite.

    No Prerequisites

    3 credits
    PR 201

    PR 201 Intaglio Printmaking l

    The representational, sculptural and textural possibilities of inked and printed metal are literally limitless. This studio course is an introduction to a variety of intaglio printmaking techniques including drypoint, hardground and softground etching, and aquatint. Students will learn editioning and monoprinting methods while developing their grasp over elements of design, conveying concepts, and capitalizing on materiality. The evolution of an image through a developing series of states is a concern of this course. This includes the ‘multi-part print project’ and its many structures: folios, editions, artists’ books and installation. Students will gain familiarity with safe and professional printmaking practices and develop a language for printmaking critique. Once basic methods of getting marks below the surface of copper plates are familiar, a range of image-expanding options such as chine collé (printing while collaging), and color printing processes are covered. Field trips will support the student's understanding of local printmaking studio resources as well as offer opportunities to see prints by well-known and emerging artists first-hand. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week. No prerequisite.

    No Prerequisites

    3 credits
    PR 240

    PR 240 The Book as Visual Object

    This rigorous, in-depth examination of the book as an art form will introduce students to traditional bookbinding materials, structures and techniques. Regular assignments or "prompts" will present an opportunity to apply and translate those structures incorporating them into one's own studio practice. Emphasis will be on encouraging participants to tailor what is presented in class to suit their own needs and aesthetic and to explore the endless possibilities of the book. The semester will be comprised of weekly hands-on demonstrations, guided studio time, critiques and periodic field trips. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week. No prerequisite.

    No Prerequisites

    Additional Notes : Not open to first year students

    3 credits
    PR 242

    PR 242 (PE) Topics in Print: The Archive Surprises (Mining Material, Methods, and Meaning)

    Archives brim over with expected and unexpected elements, both of which are capable of setting off entirely new directions in any artist, craftsperson, or designer’s practice as well as broadening and/or deepening explorations already underway. Students will conduct research at several local archives and learn research methods for utilizing physical and online archives in order to mine source material, including letters and other texts, imagery, photographs, scientific data and specimens, objects/artifacts, film, and oral histories. We will make multiple visits to The University of New England’s Maine Women Writer’s Collection, which includes an extensive collection of artist books as well as troves of archival material related to: health, LGBTQIA+, Maine life and culture, native people, nature and the environment, suffrage, the Arctic, and WWII. Visits to other archives at University of New England may include The National Elder Perspective Archive, known as the Caregiver Diaries; The Peter J. Morgane Research Collection on the Cetacean Brain; and Randall J. Cushing Collection of WWI and WWII Letters. The University of Southern Maine will also be a rich resource, particularly the African American Collection; Judaica Collection; and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer + Collection, all housed at USM’s Jean Byers Samson Center for Diversity in Maine. We will consider the ethical and legal aspects of appropriation and recontextualization as well as study artists and designers who have both created their own archives as well as those who utilize archives in research yielding work in a range of media. Students will generate self-directed work utilizing materials and methodologies introduced in the class, and have the option of working in print media or other disciplines to create the work the research inspires/incites/extends. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week.

    Prerequisites : Open to any student majoring, or one PR class, or any course with a Public Engagement component at MECA.

    3 credits
    PR 300

    PR 300 Intaglio Printmaking II

    Students enrolled in Intaglio Printmaking II will investigate the complex and varied potential of intaglio prints in terms of concept, format and function. Students will dig deeper into familiar techniques, while learning new methods in etching, collagraph, and mezzotint. Intaglio II students will work in a more self-driven manner than introductory students, while also benefiting from opportunities to participate in collaborative projects such as exchange portfolios. Research projects will yield presentations offered to the class in topics chosen by the student based on their interests in historical and contemporary printmaking. Intaglio II students will begin exploring context and installing works in the world in alignment with where they see their work existing on the spectrum spanning from limited edition or one-of-a-kind fine art prints to site-specific installation or broadly disseminated reproductions of intaglio prints. Multiple plate printing will be introduced. Field trips will support the student's advanced exploration of intaglio printmaking. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week.

    Prerequisites : PR 201

    3 credits
    PR 301

    PR 301 Printmaking Majors Studio

    The emphasis of this course is on the development and enhancement of your studio practice and the production of a cohesive body of work. The primary focus will be on your work, looking specifically at how you articulate your ideas, the quality and quantity of your work and your contextualization of what you make. Student work is refined through a rigorous critique process and individual studio meetings with faculty. Moving through a range of assignments and projects, students build skills and acquire the knowledge to critically position their work within the larger historical and conceptual framework that defines print. Studio assignments, readings, topical seminars, writing assignments, research presentations, digitechs, critique, visiting artist workshops and special projects present students with new ideas and ways of making. Students will increase their communication and critical thinking skills through critiques, studio visits and artists talks, where you will present your work and the broader ideas surrounding it. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week.

    Prerequisites : Two (2) PR 100 or 200 level classes in the first 2 years.

    3 credits
    PR 302

    PR 302 Printmaking Majors Studio

    The emphasis of this course is on the development and enhancement of your studio practice and the production of a cohesive body of work. The primary focus will be on your work, looking specifically at how you articulate your ideas, the quality and quantity of your work and your contextualization of what you make. Student work is refined through a rigorous critique process and individual studio meetings with faculty. Moving through a range of assignments and projects, students build skills and acquire the knowledge to critically position their work within the larger historical and conceptual framework that defines print. Studio assignments, readings, topical seminars, writing assignments, research presentations, digitechs, critique, visiting artist workshops and special projects present students with new ideas and ways of making. Students will increase their communication and critical thinking skills through critiques, studio visits and artists talks, where you will present your work and the broader ideas surrounding it. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week.

    Prerequisites : PR 301

    3 credits
    PR 351

    PR 351 Introduction to the Discipline

    Students develop the skills and acquire the knowledge to critically position their work within the larger historical and contemporary framework that defines (or more accurately fails to define) print, a highly expansive discipline that is perhaps best characterized as a state of mind or world view than a defined set of methods and techniques. The course objectives are covered through readings and topical seminars, including writing assignments, research and presentations. Individual studio meetings, and potential field trips to Boston, New York, and/or other locations, assist students in defining their interests and goals. Visiting artist workshops and collaborative projects allow students to broaden their range of technical skills and expand their definition of printed art forms. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week.

    Prerequisites : Two (2) PR 100 or 200 level classes in the first 2 years.

    3 credits
    PR 401

    PR 401 Printmaking Majors Studio

    The emphasis of this course is on the development and enhancement of your studio practice and the production of a cohesive body of work. The primary focus will be on your work, looking specifically at how you articulate your ideas, the quality and quantity of your work and your contextualization of what you make. Student work is refined through a rigorous critique process and individual studio meetings with faculty. Moving through a range of assignments and projects, students build skills and acquire the knowledge to critically position their work within the larger historical and conceptual framework that defines print. Studio assignments, readings, topical seminars, writing assignments, research presentations, digitechs, critique, visiting artist workshops and special projects present students with new ideas and ways of making. Students will increase their communication and critical thinking skills through critiques, studio visits and artists talks, where you will present your work and the broader ideas surrounding it. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week or 6 credits/semester; 12 hours/week option.

    Prerequisites : PR 301-302

    3 credits
    PR 402

    PR 402 Printmaking Majors Studio

    The emphasis of this course is on the development and enhancement of your studio practice and the production of a cohesive body of work. The primary focus will be on your work, looking specifically at how you articulate your ideas, the quality and quantity of your work and your contextualization of what you make. Student work is refined through a rigorous critique process and individual studio meetings with faculty. Moving through a range of assignments and projects, students build skills and acquire the knowledge to critically position their work within the larger historical and conceptual framework that defines print. Studio assignments, readings, topical seminars, writing assignments, research presentations, digitechs, critique, visiting artist workshops and special projects present students with new ideas and ways of making. Students will increase their communication and critical thinking skills through critiques, studio visits and artists talks, where you will present your work and the broader ideas surrounding it. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week.

    Prerequisites : PR 401

    3 credits
    SEM 353

    3YR Seminar: Fine Art Topics - Practice

    Fine Arts - Contemporary Topics and Practice is a studio/discussion course designed to provide historical ideas, context and ground for students to more clearly define their own studio work and relationship to art history. Group conversations, field trips, in-process critiques, workshops and/or visiting artists will assist students in establishing strategies for studio research in order to isolate, identify, and pursue a meaningful subject(s) within a personal and art historical context. Students will practice voicing their attitudes, opinions and conclusions about the topics discussed in seminar and gain more confidence talking about their own practice within larger issues of history, society, and culture outside of the art world. Scheduled concurrently with other sections of junior seminar, faculty and students will have the opportunity to meet as a larger group when appropriate. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week.

    Prerequisites : Must be majoring.

    3 credits
    SEM 451

    Professional Studio

    This one-semester course is designed to deliver professional development information to seniors through presentations and lectures pertinent to artists and designers. Topics from how to establish a studio/community to various ways of working with individuals and the public; to making a professional identity package and finances plus many more will be explored. In addition to lectures and tutorials, there may also be field trips connected to appropriate topics, as well as visiting artists and professionals such as a CPA and Maine Arts Commission. Class projects are designed to offer specific experiences and skills pertinent to the student’s professional development. Sections will be split to focus on area-specific professional information and assignments. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 2.5 hours/week.\

    Prerequisites : Must be majoring.

    3 credits
    SEM 452

    SEM 452 Senior Synthesis

    This course is taken in the final semester of the senior year. It is an integral course with the studio practice. Students will be led through a guided research and writing process to identify and explore what their inspirations are for their studio work, how those interests are played out historically and what their relevance is to contemporary art and culture. The class will culminate in a fully articulated written thesis that explains and details their thesis work. Students will present their ideas at various points throughout the semester and conversations will be held about the ideas underlying their work both in the classroom and in individualized studio visits. Major requirement: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week.

    Prerequisites : Must be in your senior year.

    3 credits