Due to the recent increase in Covid-19 cases locally and the Omicron variant surge predicted to reach Maine in the coming weeks, Maine College of Art & Design is delaying the start of the BFA and MFA Spring 2022 semester by two weeks. In conjunction with that closure, and in efforts to lower the risk to our communities, the ICA will also be closed. We will reopen with our new exhibition on January 28, 2022.

The Institute of Contemporary Art at Maine College of Art & Design (ICA at MECA&D) (Portland, ME) cultivates engagement and dialogue regarding contemporary visual art practices, aiming to foster discourse on the critical conversations of our time, and to enhance understanding of visual culture. Located in stunning galleries in Maine College of Art & Design’s landmark Porteous Building, the ICA at MECA&D presents an exhibition calendar of ambitious work by living artists, operates as a learning laboratory for MECA&D students, and a center for public programming regarding contemporary art that engages with the local, national and global art community.

Hosting five exhibitions each year accompanied by a dynamic series of public events and artist talks, the ICA at MECA&D also supports MECA&D graduate student exhibitions and Maine College of Art & Design events. We are dedicated to working across platforms collaboratively and thinking with others to inspire creative action, reimagine our future, and create compassionate communities together through visual art.

Hours

  • Wednesday – Sunday, 11:00am – 5:00pm
  • Thursday, 11:00am – 7:00pm

Contact:

ica@meca.edu
207.699.5029

Admission:

ICA at MECA&D is always free. Donations are appreciated.

The ICA acknowledges that the land known as Portland, Maine, on which the galleries stand, is the traditional territory of the Wabanaki Confederacy which includes the Abenaki, Micmac, Penobscot, Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Nations. We recognize our ability to live and work on this land is possible because of the stewardship and sacrifices of tribal individuals and nations both ancestral and modern.

Header Image: Aurelia Wrenn, The Summer's Last Watermelon, 2020