Registration & Academic Advising

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Our office is committed to providing you with the knowledge and guidance you need to navigate successfully through the curriculum here at Maine College of Art.  Each of us is well versed in the specifics of the course requirements at the college, and we are here to answer any questions that you might have.  In addition to course registration and scheduling events, our office hosts several educational events designed to help each student make the most informed decisions possible in view of their own individual plans for academic and professional success.

Below is a list of the services that we provide:   

Office Staff

Anne Dennison
Registrar
In the office 8-4
adennison@meca.edu

207.699.5054
Julie Smith, Assistant
Registrar & Academic Advisor
In the office 9-5
jsmith@meca.edu

207.699.5057

Based on 120 credits for student entering MECA after 2009

  • 121 credits required if matriculated between Fall 2003 and Spring 2007
  • 129 credits required if matriculated between Fall 2002 and Spring 2003
  • 132 credits required if matriculated between Fall 1999 and spring 2002
  • 134 credits required if matriculated prior to   Fall 1999.

Part-time students take less than 12 credits per semester and must follow the prerequisite structure of the program.

At the end of each semester the Registration & Academic Advising Office records your completed courses (course number and semester completed) and credits earned on your degree requirement control sheet, which is given to you during registration. Any questions about the accuracy of your control sheet should be directed to the Registration & Academic Advising Office. Questions regarding course selection should be directed to your Academic Advisor or Faculty Mentor. Please keep your control sheet handy when making enrollment decisions. Tracking your courses in relationship to your requirements is critical in both following the sequential learning necessary to successfully complete all course work and to graduate on time. 

Years One & Two: Synthesis
In your first two years at MECA you will acquire the language and skills common to all art making, whatever the medium. You will learn to be disciplined about your work and will be challenged to take risks and to push your limits. Foundation reviews (critiques) of your work at the end of each semester will give you valuable feedback from both faculty and your peers, helping you to understand and evaluate your strengths and areas for growth.

Art History Requirements 
Students must take 15 credits of Art History courses, as follows:
6 credits   Art History Survey 
3 credits   AH 250 Critical Approaches to Contemporary Art
3 credits   Non-Western Art History 
3 credits   Art History electives of your choice.

Liberal Arts Requirements 
Students must take 30 credits of liberal arts courses, as follows:
6 credits  EN 100 English Composition & EN 105 Introduction to Literature 
3 credits  World History (WH) 
3 credits  Western Philosophy (WP) 
6 credits  Natural Science (NS) 
6 credits  Humanities or Social Science  (HU/SS) 
6 credits your choice (NS, SS, HU, WP or WH; (note: Art History electives do not meet this requirement))

 

Studio Requirements

First year students take 6 credits of studio electives in their first year of study along with:

  • FYL 100 (PE) FY-IN    This seminar involves studio work, academic research, and involvement with a community partner. Its intent is to fully immerse you in art and design, to involve you in the MECA and Portland communities, and to place your creative efforts into a real-world context. FY-In teaches the critical importance of combining research and practice, and serves as an introduction to collaborating with one another and with a community partner. Students read, write, research, make art, discuss and critique while working on specific projects in their section. The course is required of all First Year students: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week.

 

Sophomores take 12 credits of studio electives in their second year of study along with: 

  • SYL 200 – SECOND YEAR LAB            Second Year Lab is designed to immerse students in a sustained project in order to combine and advance objectives from their foundation year, develop the ability to take an idea from inception to completion, and introduce professional skills necessary to be an artist at work. Students will research, write, make, revise, remake, and present their work in a professional context. Within this interdisciplinary class, required of all second-year students, structured parameters create an environment in which students have the opportunity to work both individually and collaboratively while developing the skills to self-direct.  Elective: 3 credits/semester; 6 hours/week. Prerequisite: Foundation courses completed.

Choice of Studio:  3D Fabrication / Drawing Elective above DR 100 / Media Electives

Foundation Studio courses

3 credits    FN 113 Two Dimensional Design
3 credits    FN 115 Three Dimensional Design
3 credits    DR 100 Introduction to Drawing - see Drawing Curriculum below
3 credits    FN 101 Digital Imaging- see descriptions below

 

Digital Imaging Requirements - Students can one class from the following:

3 credits FN 101-B Digital Imaging: Basics
3 credits FN 101-DPT Digital Imaging: Drawing & Painting 
3 credits FN 101-PH Digital Imaging: Photography 
3 credits FN 101-3D Digital Imaging: 3D

The Drawing Curriculum 
The Drawing curriculum at MECA is sequenced to provide progressive challenges within a flexible structure, allowing students to make an educated choice about the path of their studies within this diverse discipline. After beginning with a common perceptual dialog in the required DR 100 Introductory Drawing, students are encouraged to choose courses that match their representational, non-objective or professional aspirations. At each successive level, courses are structured to build upon what came before, culminating in advanced courses in very specific topics. While only one class from each level of drawing is required to proceed to the next, a student may choose to expand their technical expertise by continuing to take second and third level electives at any time in their academic career. 


Year Three & Four: Majoring

Majors

  • Ceramics
  • Graphic Design
  • Illustration
  • Metalsmithing & Jewelry
  • New Media
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
  • Woodworking & Furniture Design

Minors 

  • Art History
  • Drawing
  • Public Engagement

MECA offers ten majors and three minors. Students declare their majors in the spring of their sophomore year. They must meet with the department chair of their chosen major and obtain the chair’s signature to start the approval process.

To enter a major, you must have achieved satisfactory academic progress and be in good academic standing (minimum GPA of 2.0 [C]), have completed their first two years (60 credits), and also have completed a minimum of two semesters of electives in your chosen major department with a grade of at least 2.7 (B-) in your second semester major studio elective. The Registrar will continue the approval process after the spring term grades are recorded. The Registrar will then send a report to the appropriate Program Chair regarding the academic standing of the incoming majors. Program Chairs can decide to allow a student into a major on a probationary basis. This student then must achieve a GPA of 2.0 [C] or better within the studio major in the first term of majoring.  Enrollment in a studio major may occur before the last four semesters if all prerequisites are met and departmental permission is obtained.

A minimum of nine major credit hours per semester is required while majoring. Students must maintain a minimum 2.0 semester GPA in the major studio courses. However, if a student’s major GPA falls below 2.0 during the first semester of the first year of majoring, the student may remain in the major if at least a 2.0 semester major GPA is achieved during each semester thereafter. Failure to maintain a 2.0 major GPA in any other semester will result in the student’s ineligibility to continue in that major.

Prerequisites
Many courses have prerequisites, which are noted at the end of each course description. Be sure you have completed the prerequisites for any courses for which you want to register. In addition, please note that many courses are sequential from fall to spring.

Independent study   
MECA students have the opportunity to design their own independent study course and explore areas of interest not currently offered in our curriculum. To be eligible, a student must be at least a sophomore and have a cumulative GPA of 3.0. Interested students must complete an Independent Study application form, available at the Registration & Academic Advising Office.  The Scholastic Affairs Committee and the Dean of the College will approve all Independent Studies during the semester prior to the semester in which they will be performed; deadlines are strict and are printed in the Academic Calendar. Upon receipt of appropriate approval, the Registrar will automatically register the student in the course and provide documentation to the student. A lab fee will be applied.

Internships    
Internships are available in a wide range of both studio and art administration settings, and provide opportunities for students to explore first-hand the different venues in which their art knowledge and skills may be applied to be eligible, a student must be in good academic standing (cumulative GPA of at least 2.0) Students may receive course credit while gaining professional, hands-on experience and building relationships with practicing professionals not infrequently, internships lead to summer or post-graduation employment opportunities, and become the basis for life and career defining decisions.  (LINK TO MOJO)

If you are interested in doing an internship, contact the Career Services Office for information on available placements. All internship applications must be completed and approved by the Dean of the College during the semester prior to the semester in which they will be performed; deadlines are printed in the Academic Calendar. Upon receipt of appropriate approval, the Registration & Academic Advising Office will automatically register the student in the course and provide documentation to the student.

Curriculum Fair    
The Annual Curriculum Fair, held each spring, marks the beginning of the registration process for the following year. Faculty from each department and area are available to answer questions and discuss courses and majors. Staff from the Registrar’s Office distribute the fall and spring course schedule and registration materials, and are available to assist students.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

MFA. Credit and Academic Calendar  - The Maine College of Art M.F.A. in Studio Arts takes two full years (24 months) to complete sixty credits. From 1998-2009, each year was divided into two twelve-credit semesters. Starting June 2010 the program moved to a trimester system with each full-time trimester equaling ten-credits.  One credit equals 45 hours of combined contact and independent work.

MFA Grading System  - Letter grade system with grade point equivalents.   Plus and minus grades are computed in to grade point averages.  “W” (withdrawal) and “I” (incomplete) are not calculated into the grade point average.  Graduate students shall maintain a 3.0 GPA (A=4.0), satisfy all course requirements as stated in course syllabi, and must be granted committee permission to proceed to the second and final year.

 

Degree Requirement Core Map of the MFA Program at MECA

Trimester 1: Summer

10 credits

 

Trimester 4: Summer

10 credits

Required:

 

Credits

 

Required:

 

Credits

MST 851

Studio I

6

 

MST856

Studio IV

6

MCR861

Perspectives

2

 

MCR864

Perspectives II

2

Elective (1 required)

 

 

Elective (1 required)

 

MEL870

Seminar in Independent Curating

2

 

MEL 870

Seminar in Independent Curating

2

MEL 875

Cinematheque

2

 

MEL875

Cinematheque

2

MEL 873

Open Elective: Artist at Work

 

 

MEL 873

Open Elective: Artist at Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trimester 2: Winter

10 credits

 

Trimester 5: Winter

10 credits

Required:

 

Credits

 

Required:

 

Credits

MST852

Studio II

6

 

MST857

Studio V

6

MST853

Research Methodologies I

2

 

MST858

Research Methodologies II

2

MCR862

Contemporary Art Since 1945

2

 

MCR865

Guided Studies

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trimester 3: Spring

10 credits

 

Trimester 6: Spring

10 credits

Required:

 

 

 

Required:

 

 

MST854

Studio III

6

 

MST859

Studio VI

6

MST862

Studio in Focus

2

 

MST860

Studio Thesis

2

MCR867

Art Since Now

2

 

MCR866

Thesis Composition

2

More information can be found on the MFA portion of the MECA web site

ART EDUCATION

Information forthcoming.

Each graduate will:

  • Effectively communicate ideas visually, orally and in writing.
  • Understand one's personal creative process, and apply appropriate materials and design methodologies to content.
  • Create a self directed and distinct body of work.
  • Demonstrate core proficiencies within one's chosen discipline.
  • Apply critical, analytical and creative thinking to problem solving.
  • Appropriately contextualize one's work into a broader historical and cultural framework.
  • Have command of information literacy skills in order to develop and carry out research to support academic and studio inquiries.
  • Understand and implement best professional practices within one's field of study.

 

FOUNDATION PROGRAM

Formal
Students who have successfully completed the two-year Foundation Program share a common vocabulary of principles of design in two and three dimensions. They are experienced examiners of visual forms, and can articulate interactions of figure/ground, interval, scale and texture, and how these qualities affect perception and form. Students acquire an applied understanding and vocabulary of color characteristics of hue, value, saturation, and temperature. They understand how craft impacts the effectiveness of work.

Technical
Students who have completed Foundation have experience working with both additive and subtractive materials to fabricate three-dimensional objects, have mastered basic drawing skills with a range of materials, and are familiar with basic woodworking techniques and safety practices.

Conceptual
Students have developed the fundamentals of critical analysis, brainstorming, and transferability of concepts across disciplines and mediums. They understand the link between form and content, and material and content.

Professional
Students develop the ability to see a project through stages of design and idea development, and appreciate the importance of appropriate presentation. They demonstrate strengthened focus, discipline, persistence, and patience. Upon the completion of the second year, students have acquired the fundamentals necessary to declare a major.


LIBERAL ARTS PROGRAM

The goal of the Liberal Arts curriculum at the Maine College of Art is to provide art students with basic skills in critical thinking, writing and reading and to promote intellectual curiosity. The courses help students understand the cultural, historical, scientific, literary, and philosophical context out of which much creative endeavor arises. Rather than absolute answers, we help students ask ever more difficult questions that will inform their lives as artists. When students leave Maine College of Art, it is our goal that they will be ready to direct their own learning and focus their creative and intellectual gifts in an informed manner.

The Liberal Arts department provides art students with a two-pronged approach that complements their studio education: basic skills in reading, writing, critical thinking, mathematics, and the scientific method along with knowledge in a variety of disciplines, cultures, and chronologies that students can use within their creative practice and as well- rounded, well-informed citizens in the twenty-first century.

Formal
Students develop their reading and writing skills, and cultivate a personal, original and dynamic voice in writing and speaking. Students gain the ability to discuss the values, beliefs, and cultural productions of societies other than their own. Students have the ability to present ideas clearly, to develop a cogent argument, and to speak with confidence. They use scientific and mathematical methods and principles in a meaningful context, and develop observational skills in the laboratory and through field experiences. Students gain the ability to discuss social and ethical issues related to technological developments in science and develop teamwork skills.

Conceptual
Students gain knowledge of basic principles of Western civilization, with an emphasis on classical antiquity, Christianity, and modern British and American literature. Students gain knowledge of historical and philosophical methodology, including the types of questions historians and philosophers ask and the sources they use. Students have a basic familiarity with worldwide cultural traditions and knowledge in the basic chronology of world and western cultures. Students gain knowledge of the metaphysical and physical dimensions of mathematics, and of scientific theories and methodology. Students explore different theories attempting to answer universal questions (Where do we come from? What are we? What is our place in the world? Where are we going?) in terms of history, philosophy, and science

Technical
Students competently produce several forms of writing, including a thesis, research paper, book report, critical analysis of literature, argument, and personal essay. Students learn library (book and database) research skills. Students increase their reading comprehension and analytical skills, and use correct academic style (MLA, APA or Chicago) in citing sources and bibliographies. Students use laboratory and field study equipment and apply mathematical concepts and scientific theories to practical and creative laboratory and field projects.

ART HISTORY


The Maine College of Art graduate who has completed the 15 credits of required Art History courses is competent to demonstrate knowledge in the history of world art including western and non-western art history. All students take two semesters of Art History Survey, a minimum of one non-western art history course, one elective art history course, and one semester of Critical Issues, a 200-level critical theory course. At the completion of their degree, students will have gained knowledge in art history ranging from ancient to contemporary art.

Formal
Students demonstrate the ability to verbally describe, discuss and analyze a work of art; evaluate art critically; place works of art in historical, stylistic or cultural context; describe and analyze a work of art in writing; lead a group discussion; and give a presentation on a research topic.

Conceptual
Students gain an awareness of the history of world art; knowledge of at least one area of non-western art; and an understanding of how critical theory applies to art.

Technical
Competency requires writing a research paper, and demonstrating a basic understanding of library research, web browsing, word processing; and proper citation practices. Professional museum and gallery visits provide first-hand experience.

Professional
Experience of having visited a museum.

CERAMICS


Formal
Ceramics is a hybrid medium; it embraces a range of formal principles from two- and three-dimensional design, as well as the concerns of sculptural and functional art making. These complex interrelationships help define the contemporary dynamic of the medium. Students learn about the ways form addresses space. They learn about balance, stance, profile, symmetry and asymmetry, rhythm, movement and scale. Students learn about the formal issues of the vessel: the relationship of inside volume to outside form and the relationship of inside surface to outside surface. They also learn about the relationship between form and function, the importance of craftsmanship and attention to detail, color relationships and the effect of glazes and slips upon the surface of form, and how to orchestrate the two-dimensional processes of drawing and painting on a three-dimensional form.

Conceptual
Students learn to organize and apply the formal principles of design in the service of content. They learn to work in a self-directed manner and to define areas of personal interest. Students develop the critical insight to objectively examine their own work and the work of their peers. Students learn to write an artist statement that clearly articulates their process of making and reflects an understanding of the sources of influence within and beyond the art world. Students also learn to research artists with whom they share ideas and content. Students learn to relate their work to historical and contemporary issues.

Technical
In the throwing class students learn the sequential process of centering, opening and throwing the clay into an increasing complex range of vessel forms. In the handbuilding class students learn tile making, coil building, slab construction, mold making and slip casting techniques. Students learn the safe operation of departmental equipment including the clay mixer, slab roller, potter’s wheels, extruder, and spray booth. Students learn methods for the safe operation of gas and electric kilns. They also learn about the design and construction of these kilns. Students learn to fire their own artwork. Students are required to know the fundamental properties of ceramic materials. Once this basic knowledge is acquired, students learn to formulate and test clay bodies, glazes, and slips. Students learn to apply this technical information to developing clay bodies and glazes appropriate for their artwork. Students are required to maintain a safe studio practice and comply with the college’s environmental plan.

Professional
An integrated curriculum incorporates career preparation practices into both years of the Ceramics major. The sequence of professional experiences begins in the junior year with an emphasis on the documentation of studio work. Ceramics Majors are required to photograph work with the goal of developing a professional portfolio prior to graduation.

High quality visual documentation is the basis for application to publications, exhibitions, and other professional activity. Majors are encouraged to gain professional experience by applying for juried exhibitions outside of the college. They are required to research graduate schools, artist-in-residence programs, and grant opportunities; each student then presents information to the class. Seniors are required, after reviewing a variety of formats and styles, to prepare a professional resume. Seniors are required to prepare a substantial artist statement that summarizes the process of developing their final body of work. The artist statement has proven to be a valuable component of the last semester: it is a portable document that students have regularly incorporated into applications for career opportunities. An annual field trip to an artist’s studio acquaints seniors with the realities of setting up a studio after graduation.

GRAPHIC DESIGN


Formal
Students leave the institution with a working understanding of tools & technology (including, but not limited to, drawing, printing, photography, and time-based and interactive media), and their roles in the creation, reproduction, and distribution of design. They gain a working understanding of design for production and the ability to create the design of letterforms to photographic image making, print design, web design & motion graphics.

Conceptual
Students develop an awareness of the history and theory of graphic design and contemporary design practices. They are able to develop design interventions, possess the skills to identify a design need or incentive, and are adept at research and information gathering, analysis, concept development, design strategy development, exploration of alternative solutions, design prototyping & implementation. They demonstrate an awareness of contemporary issues, cultural context, authorship and audience perception, have a command of relevant critical language, and are able to think conceptually.

Technical
Students gain a thorough understanding of what graphic design can be (a strategy, object or structure) and an awareness of the transferability and versatility of their education into the related fields of design, motion design, web design, art direction, pre-press, publishing and all areas of the fine and graphic arts, and into the field of teaching. Students leave the institution with the ability to use design strategies to explore ideas outside the discipline.

Professional
An open-mind and self-affirming attitude are hallmarks of the Graphic Design graduate. They have learned how to create and develop visual form in response to design incentives, including an understanding of principles of visual organization/composition, information hierarchy, representational strategies, and typography and style. They demonstrate a working understanding of design for production and the ability to design both in and outside the computer. Students gain a working understanding of collaborative practices in contemporary design, and experience a professional work environment, through an internship or other workplace experience, with a graphic design studio or a designer. They understand the business of being an artist/designer, and are able to write a resume and cover letter, conduct portfolio interviews, get an internship, and freelance. They have developed a body of work and presented it in an exhibition, along with a written, designed process book.

ILLUSTRATION


Formal
Students will gain an understanding of the expressive nature of illustration in a variety of media. Students will learn how to communicate ideas visually, solve problems and think critically. Students will be able to develop techniques and skills to service content.

Conceptual
Students acquire knowledge about the history of illustration, contemporary theories and practice, and relevant critical language. Students generate a variety of assignments leading up to a self-directed body of work and articulate their work within a historical and contemporary context. Students gain competency and confidence in working for potential clients as well as directing and executing their ideas. and being aware of contemporary illustrators who continue to define the discipline. Through research and imitation, they acquire a working knowledge of the concepts and techniques of the illustrators who have made a significant contribution to this discipline and define its current practice.

Technical
Students gain competency in drawing skills including anatomy and figure, and representational and abstract. Students are able to explore with a variety of mediums and tools in 2D and 3D, such as pen and ink, paint, computer, clay, collage, pastel, and scratchboard. Experimentation is encouraged. Students develop an understanding of the nature of taking risks with their work and their relationship to it. They become experts in drawing, with familiarity in many types of drawing: systems drawing, perspective, visual conceits, process, sketching (tracing, thumbnails, roughs) observational drawing (life forms, objects, space), and conceptual drawing.

Professional
Students write an artist statement and professional resume, create a website to promote their work, design and print a postcard for mailing, and develop a client list to send sample work to. Students develop the ability to document their work digitally. Students gain confidence and are provided with the opportunity to meet with and seek out professionals in the field for opportunities of work and internships. Students gain an understanding of how to seek clients, price work, and run a freelance business as an illustrator. They have a sense of the contemporary illustration market and the breadth of skills needed to be successful in this field. Students gain an awareness of the transferability and versatility of their education into the related fields of graphic design, art direction, pre-press, publishing and all areas of the fine and graphic arts.


METALSMITHING & JEWELRY


Formal
Students gain an understanding of the expressive nature of both two- and three-dimensional form in relationship to the human body and independent objects such as hollowware. Students have grounding in formal design language, problem-solving skills, and critical thinking. They develop the ability to choose appropriate techniques, materials and formal design language to develop a visual vocabulary in service to content.

Conceptual
Students acquire knowledge about the history of jewelry and metalsmithing, the field’s contemporary theories and practices, and relevant critical language. Students gain skills to develop a self-directed body of work and articulate their work within both a historical and contemporary context. Students develop an understanding of the potential and limitations of non-ferrous metals and any other materials used, along with their social, cultural and conceptual implications. Students gain competency and confidence in their own process of working: how to generate, develop, and execute ideas.

Technical
Students gain competency and confidence in technical skills that include: soldering, fabrication techniques, forming, raising, multiple finishing methods, stone setting and fine goldsmithing skills in non-ferrous metals, enameling, and chasing and repousse. Students gain knowledge of the potential and limitations of non-ferrous metals’ physical characteristics and structural value, and any related health and safety concerns. Students understand standard safety procedures regarding chemicals and toxic materials. They are competent in proper tool usage and care. Students encounter and develop an understanding of the nature of risk-taking with their work and their relationship to it.

Professional
Students learn to write an artist statement, professional resume, cover letter and artist bio. They work with a professional photographer to gain optimum visual documentation of their work. They seek out and research opportunities in the field through the use of the web, professional organizations, publications and periodicals, and gain an understanding of how to approach a gallery. Students gain experience in applying for juried exhibitions, displaying work in a professional and effective manner, and mastering the basic business practices needed to run a sole proprietorship, i.e. bookkeeping for tax purposes, pricing work, studio start-up costs, registering yourself as a business in any given state, and using a CPA to advantage.

NEW MEDIA


Formal
Students learn to research and gather information, analyze and conceptualize ideas, design strategy development, and explore alternative solutions, design prototyping & implementation. Students gain an awareness of contemporary issues and cultural studies, and a command of relevant critical language. Students become grounded in a formal visual language, problem-solving skills, and critical thinking. Students develop the ability to choose appropriate techniques, media, materials and formal language to develop a visual vocabulary in service to content. They learn to develop, recognize, and articulate a method for developing a personal body of work. They develop a working understanding of collaborative practices in the studio as well as in a professional setting. Students develop a quality body of work reflecting their personal vision, which culminates in the thesis show and is presented with a written and designed process book.

Conceptual
Students gain skills to develop a self-directed body of work and articulate their work within a historical and contemporary context. They develop an understanding of the potential and limitations of new media and materials used, and their social, cultural and conceptual implications. Students gain competency and confidence in their process of working: the generation, development, and execution of ideas. Students have a thorough understanding of conceptual thinking and awareness of cultural context, authorship and audience perception. Students have an awareness of the transferability and versatility of their education into the related fields of new media, motion design, web design, art direction and teaching, and the ability to explore ideas outside the discipline.

Technical
Students gain competency and confidence in technical skills that include: interactive media, video art and editing production, web design and development, 3D model and image making, game design, installations, sound art, and generative art. Students develop a working understanding of tools & technology, including their roles in the creation, reproduction, and distribution of content. Relevant tools and technologies include, but are not limited to, drawing, printing, photography, and time-based and interactive media.

Professional

Students learn to write an artist’s statement, professional resume, cover letter and artist’s bio. Students learn to seek out and research opportunities in the field through the use of the internet, professional organizations, publications and periodicals. Students gain an understanding of how to approach a gallery and apply for juried exhibitions, and learn how to display their work in a professional and effective manner.

PAINTING


Formal
Students develop their perceptual skills, including but not limited to: translation of space, light, form and visual relationships onto a two-dimensional surface. Students gain the ability to interpret color and understand its components enough to manipulate it with control, and develop an understanding of the nature of process with their work and their relationship to it. Students learn to choose appropriate techniques, materials, and formal design language to develop visual vocabulary in service of content, and the ability to maintain a disciplined studio practice.

Conceptual
Students gain the ability to translate personal concepts into visual form and research strategies to support development of personal concepts. Students participate in independent and group critical discourse and leave the institution with a comprehensive understanding of the history of painting, contemporary painting movements, and familiarity with topical issues of contemporary art. Students are able to develop a self-directed body of work and critically present work in relation to art history, cultural influences, material culture, and personal context..

Technical
Students gain competency and confidence in the manipulation of fundamental painting materials including oil paints and mediums. Techniques in oils are easily translated to acrylic and other water-based media. Manipulation of fundamental painting techniques and brushwork effects (e.g., glazing, scumbling, staining, impasto, blending and dry brush) are practiced. Students learn to choose the appropriate tools for a desired outcome. Students possess craftsmanship and technical skills in: creating painting supports and grounds, studio setup, care and maintenance of tools and materials, awareness of standard safety procedures, hazardous materials, and the environmental hazards inherent in painting.

Professional
Students create an artist statement, build a resume, and prepare slide and digital documentation of their work. Students prepare for graduate school, apply for grants and residencies, participate in group exhibitions, and learn about marketing work and sales strategies. Students gain knowledge of general business practices, gain experience in applying for juried exhibitions and gain access to gallery directors to learn about how to approach galleries. Students have the ability to seek out and research job and exhibition opportunities through the use of the web, professional organizations, publications and periodicals, and access to other professional artists through visiting artist program.

PHOTOGRAPHY


Formal
Students bridge lessons learned in Foundation-level classes with techniques and content developed in photography. From 3-D design, they harvest knowledge of how light, surface and form create spatial relations. In 2D Design, students gain an understanding of composition and the process of looking critically and objectively at their work. Students understand how formal decisions and processes inform content and develop skills and techniques that allow students to use the camera as an artistic tool.

Technical
Students learn the preparation procedures for all mixed chemistry with safe and proper handling procedures to EPA standards. Students experience all camera formats, from 35mm, medium format, digital, pinhole, and 4x5 and 8x10 view cameras. Students gain an understanding of basic film development, in silver gelatin, black & white, and color printing. Students learn how to control contrast range within the negative through choices of developer and time manipulation. Students obtain a working knowledge of digital exhibition printing using Photoshop, InDesign, Epson, Image Print and Nikon scanning software. Students learn various print presentation skills that include black & white and color print retouching, dry mounting, window matting, grometting and other frameless techniques. Students also learn traditional and non-traditional book binding skills. The culmination of these processes fosters a solid photographic proficiency and literacy exposing students to the many options available to problem solve formal and conceptual concerns, and to express their ideas, emotions and beliefs.

Conceptual
Students learn the history of photography and how it relates to contemporary art and critical theory. Visual literacy and the ability to articulate criticism is stressed through slide lectures and critiques. Exposure to a broad range of ideas and practice allows students to understand the many possibilities of photographic expression. This, in turn, allows students to develop their own photographic vision and vocabulary. They gain the skills to develop, edit and sequence a self-directed body of work and place their ideas within a historical and contemporary context.

Professional
Students gain the skills to create a professional portfolio that includes a thesis or personal essay about their work, artist statement, resume, and cover letter. Students learn how to develop a personal web page, and how to generate 35mm slides and a digital presentation of their work. Students gain experience in applying for national juried exhibitions and are expected to perform several lectures and gallery talks on their work during their senior year. Students engage in the production of creating a final thesis exhibition.

PRINTMAKING


Formal
Students exploit the print matrix in purposeful experimentation of variation, permutation, and systematic experimentation. Students use print as means to rethink drawing practice and question formal habits or preconceptions about making images. Students have a general understanding, across all techniques, of formal principles of layering, transparency, color separation and integration (clear grasp of optical and physical mixing of inks). Students are versatile in integrating fabricated (hand-drawn) imagery with sampled (photo/digital) imagery with high degree of visual coherence and material integrity, and understand the impact of series, sequence, and multiples on visual imagery.

Technical
Students gain technical proficiency in a broad range of print techniques including, but not limited to, relief, intaglio, monoprint, screenprint, book arts, stone and positive plate lithography, digital print, and alternative/experimental processes, including, paper plate lithography, photo transfers, pronto plates, solar plates, and print gocco. Students acquire understanding and technical mastery of editioning (ability to generate a series of hand pulled prints from multiple matrices) as a professional, creative, and collaborative practice. Students develop the ability to integrate contemporary photo/digital media, either into print-based works or as purely digital output and are facile with pre-press processes (such as linescreens and color separation) necessary to integrate sampled imagery. Students develop the ability to integrate disciplines from outside traditional print into studio practice: examples include drawing/ painting, installation, photo-transfer processes, sculpture/casting, motion graphics, web-based art, etc., and proficiency in exhibition practices and conventions.

Conceptual
Students develop a basic understanding of print’s history and current relevance, and an understanding of printmaking’s role within the canon of fine art and as a vehicle for vernacular culture, social dissent, and cultural identity. Students gain a familiarity with how contemporary artists have exploited the “high-art“ and “low-art” legacy of printmaking and learn to draw conceptual inferences from formal or technical decisions. Students explore layering as a tool to create visual and conceptual hierarchies within a given piece, come to grasp critical context for sampling and appropriation within a postmodern paradigm, and develop the ability to integrate self-directed research practice into studio work. Students learn to critically discuss and interpret studio works within the context of historical and contemporary print and to articulate printmaking vocabulary into other disciplines (examples: investigations of multiple form in sculpture and installation, strategies of dissemination or alternative delivery in web-based or graphic design, investigations of the social dimensions of printed matter in public and community based art.) Students come away with the ability to write clearly about their personal artistic practice and to examine methods of inquiry for art making and research, artistic influences and relationships to historical and contemporary printmaking. Students are given the opportunity to work in a variety of collaborative situations including public and private schools, youth organizations, community programs, and with visiting artists.

Professional
Students come away with a full grasp of editioning conventions, presentation, and curation of printed works. Examples include designing, organizing, and producing an exhibition of prints for a gallery, collaborative event, or publication. Students engage with conventional exhibition practices as well as alternative means of distribution and access to printed imagery (public projects and installations, publications and exchange portfolios, correspondence art, etc.) Students develop competency with general professional practices: resume preparation, press releases, promotional materials and portfolios, and documentation of work (both slide and digital).

SCULPTURE


Formal
Students learn to employ the principles of design in order to create work that is spatially and/or environmentally dynamic. Students learn to select and develop media that will fortify content. Students examine and understand the contextual opportunities for sculpture, and their relationship to subjective expression.

Conceptual
Students learn to seek new visual and intellectual themes in one’s work and develop the ability to challenge themselves technically, formally, and conceptually. Students develop communicative skills in critical thinking and writing and understand the discipline of sculpture from both historical and contemporary perspectives. Students understand and examine subjective decisions in relationship to historical and contemporary perspectives in art and learn to identify contemporary sculptors who are making significant contributions to the discipline. Students establish personal, self-sustaining work habits.

Technical
Students acquire a solid range of skills with regard to traditional and contemporary sculpture techniques. Students acquire the ability to support content through the choice appropriate techniques, process, scale, and context.

Professional
Students write an artist statement, a professional resume, cover letter and artist bio. Students learn to create a professional portfolio of studio work in both slide and digital formats. Students gain experience in applying for residencies and juried exhibitions, presenting work in an exhibition, writing a press release, creating an exhibition card, and curatorial text, and organizing a public reception. They learn how to create proposals for grants, art commissions, exhibitions, and self-created residencies, and how to seek out and research opportunities in the field through use of the web, professional organizations, publications and periodicals. Students gain an understanding of the business aspects of sculpture including promotion, contracts, issues of self-employment, and artists’ rights. Students establish confidence in one’s ability to develop and present personal work.

WOODWORKING & FURNITURE DESIGN


Formal
Students have grounding in formal design language and visual thinking skills as taught in the Foundation years and reinforced in the major. Students understand basic design principles with a particular focus on the expressive nature of three-dimensional form.

Technical
Our students possess confidence in using machine and hand tools that range from a table saw, band saw, mortise, lathe, drill press, planer, jointer, router and sanders. Students have a range of manual and machine skills in furniture making and competency in a broad range of techniques and processes. Students investigate a wide range of materials; wood in all forms and species, plastics, aluminum, bronze and steel casting, fabrication and welding, upholstery and various fibers. Students are adept at full-scale drawing and model-making techniques.

Conceptual
Students understand the history and theory of furniture design, are aware of contemporary issues, and have a command of relevant critical language. Students develop a personal voice manifested in a self-directed body of work and arrived at through a conscious design development process. Students develop critical skills relevant to their work and the work of their peers.

Professional
Students are familiar with professional organizations, associations and periodicals. They can identify models, case studies, ethics and standards within their own work as well as that of their peers. Students write an artist statement, resume, and thesis statement, and learn to document and photograph their work. Students gain experience in presenting and exhibiting their own work in a professional setting. Seniors gain experience developing an exhibition of current student work within the major.

Enrollment Rules

Students are not permitted to attend classes until all outstanding College bills are paid. Students may not register for courses until adequate proof of immunization is filed with the Registration & Academic Advising Office. A student will not receive a grade for a course unless he or she is properly registered for it. A student may receive a failing grade for a course he or she stops attending unless a drop form or exit form has been completed and submitted. 
    
It is the student’s responsibility to submit the necessary forms and to be aware of credit-load status and refund period deadlines. Students who are not achieving satisfactory academic progress will not be allowed to continue their enrollment at Maine College of art. Any student who creates a disruption or interferes with instruction of a class may be removed from that course. Any student, who causes harm to another student, or to faculty or staff, may be asked to leave the College. Students receiving financial aid are governed by the policies outlined in the catalog.

The Registrar may revoke full or partial registration at any time for lack of proper immunization records, non-payment of financial obligations to the school, or failure to complete academic prerequisites, including failure to participate in required reviews. The College reserves the right at any time to change the course offerings, fees, calendar, rules and regulations governing admission and registration. 

Directory Information & Disclosure Policy / Solomon Amendment
The College normally will not supply non-related organizations with personally identifiable student information, including “directory information.”  Active students who wish to have directory information withheld from release must do so in writing on a “per-academic-year” basis. Please remember: active students must renew a request for non-disclosure each year to keep such requests in effect.

One exception to this policy is the result of a federal law known as the “Solomon Amendment” which requires the College to release directory information to military recruiters upon request. For this purpose, directory information is defined as: name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, level of education, academic major, degrees received, and educational institution in which a student most recently was enrolled. Information not required or permitted by the Solomon Amendment and not considered directory information under FERPA will not be released without written permission of the student.

 

BFA

Mid-term Grades:  Midterm grades reflect a student’s academic progress at about six weeks into the semester.  Although midterm grades are not part of a student’s permanent record and will not be reflected in the semester grade point average (GPA), they are important indicators of how they are doing academically.    Midterm grades are meant to encourage students to get in touch with their instructors and to request academic assistance if it is needed. The Registrar will contact any student who receives three or more grades below 2.0 (C) in a semester.

Students Admitted on Probation -The Director of Admissions will determine if a student is to be admitted to the college on Academic Probation and will notify that student in writing. A student who achieves a 2.0 or better in his/her first semester will be removed from Academic Probation. If a student's GPA falls below 1.7 (C-) during their first semester, s/he will be academically dismissed.

Students who fail to comply will be subject to dismissal

Academic Probation 
All students who earn a semester grade point average below 2.0 [C] are placed on academic Probation for the following semester.* Note Students Admitted on Probation must follow policy above.

Academic Dismissal
Students who are not making Satisfactory Academic Progress, as measured by either of the College’s measures, will be academically dismissed. Any student who has attended Maine College of art for at least two semesters and who has earned a semester grade point average (GPA) below 2.0 for the two most recent consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the college. Any student who fails to meet the 67% quantitative standard at the end of the academic year will be academically dismissed without a probationary period.

Plagiarism 
Plagiarism, the use without attribution of languages, images, ideas, or the organization of ideas not one’s own, is a fundamental breach of basic academic principles and is prohibited in all courses. The development of original thinking and intellectual honesty is regarded as central to MECA’s pedagogy. Although in the pursuit of these goals students will continually consult existing works, it is expected that they will acknowledge the debt owed to others by citing all sources. Unless group work is assigned, coursework is normally completed independently. If books, journals, magazines, or any other sources are reviewed and the ideas or language therein used, they must be cited. Students should consult a reference source on proper notation. Evidence of plagiarism will result in a grade of "F" for the assignment and may, at the discretion of the faculty, lead to a grade of "F" in the course. In addition, the Dean of the College may impose further sanctions (such as probation or dismissal). For complete information, see the Student Conduct Code.

ADD / DROP / WITHDRAWAL 

As a BFA student you have the opportunity to make changes to your schedule, see below.

ADD – A student may add a class during the “add / drop period” with the written consent of their faculty member after classes have begun for the semester.

DROP– A student may drop a class during the “add / drop period” without the written consent of their faculty member after classes have begun for the semester, as long as it is done before two weeks.  After this date, students must withdraw from courses they no longer wish to attend.  

 


WITHDRAWAL from a single course after the Drop Period:
A student who withdraws from a course after the Drop Period but during the Withdrawal Period (the fifth through the eighth weeks of the semester,) will receive an automatic grade of "W." The instructor’s signature is not required to withdraw from a course during the Withdrawal Period. This grade will be reflected on your transcript.  After this date the instructor controls the grade. 

Important: Information on this form is used in determining tuition billing and enrollment status for financial aid reporting. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of his-her credit load status, refund deadlines and their effect on tuition billing and financial aid awards.