Fall 2017 Course Schedule 
Spring 2018 Course Schedule

 

    Code
    Course
    Credits
    SC 105

    The Sculptural Imagination: Wood, Metal and Foundry Practices 

    This course is an introduction to the basic techniques involved in woodworking, foundry processes, and welded steel sculpture. We will investigate the materials, methods, and concepts that serve as the foundation for creating sculptural artworks. Through weekly assignments, lectures, demonstrations, and discussions we will explore traditional and experimental approaches to the theory and practice involved in making sculpture. In each of the assignments we will study the historical, cultural, and contemporary applications and implications of these given sculptural techniques. However, the subject matter for all assignments is open to your individual interpretation. Students will learn how to identify materials, proper material usage, learn tools and safety within the Sculpture area, create finished works, and learn articulation of these materials (both physically and audibly) via critiques of finished works. The primary objective for this course is to develop the skills needed to interpret and articulate contemporary modes of creating sculpture that students will encounter as professional artists and creative problem solvers.

    No Prerequisites

    3 credits
    SC 106

    Sculpture in Context: Installation, Multiples, Land Art

    This course is an introduction to the basic techniques involved in the creation of multiples & editions, installation, and land art. We will investigate the materials, methods, and concepts that serve as the foundation for creating three- dimensional artworks. Through weekly assignments, lectures, demonstrations, and discussions we will explore traditional and experimental approaches to the theory and practice involved in making sculpture. In each of the assignments we will study the historical, cultural, and contemporary applications and implications of these given sculptural techniques. However, the subject matter for all assignments is open to your individual interpretation. Students will learn how to identify materials, proper material usage, learn tools and safety within the Sculpture area, create finished works, and learn articulation of these materials (both physically and audibly) via critiques of finished works. The primary objective for this course is to develop the skills needed to interpret and articulate contemporary modes of creating sculpture that students will encounter as professional artists and creative problem solvers.

    No Prerequisites

    3 credits
    SC 250

    Object! Object! Object!

    Our lives are in a constant contact with objects. We design them, we use them, but how do they act upon us? How do the presence and the performance of these objects resonate in tandem with our understanding of the past? This course is designed to increase each students understanding about objects as form as material, and as content. Additionally, process and techniques related to using, mass-producing, and sourcing of objects will be discussed.

    Prerequisites : FN 115

    3 credits
    SC 266

    Sculpture: Machines & Linkages

    This course is intended for intended for the Curious who wonder how things work mechanically generally this involves translating motion between linear, rotary, oscillating, or intermittent movement. An overview on the history of mechanical sculpture is provided to inspire a richness of conceptual thinking, from 1700’s automata to contemporary conceptual sculptors such as Paul Etienne Lincoln, Tim Hawkinson, and Anne Hamilton. Fabrication projects include a short group project and a short individual project, though the course is directed toward a final project of the student’s design, which may be sculpture, installation, animated 2-D collage, performance, costume, toys, etc. Design, drawings, plans, and/or models are expected. We will explore “quick-and-dirty” methods, which expedite our mechanics and introduce more refined methods to consider. Expect to use materials familiar to you along with learning new materials and processes in the wood and metal shops. The objective is to demystify mechanical linkages by understanding simple geometry and to incorporate this knowledge into the production of animated objects in interesting ways. This begins with an introduction to the basic machines (lever, pulley, inclined plane, screw, wheel & axel) as illustrated in Basic Machines and How they Work, published by the Navy. This lets us harness principles of physics that are the foundation for Kinetic Art and Mechanical Movement.

    Prerequisites : FN 115, or any 100 level sculpture class or 100 level metals class.

    3 credits
    SC 267

    Phantom Limb: The Art of Transformational Identity

    This course will cover various techniques involved in the art of transformational identity, makeup, costuming, and sculptural objects relating to the body. Our task will be to authorvisual stories resulting in thoughtful, articulate, and compelling objects, photographs, and films or videos. The bulk of the class involves reading, research, demos, studio time, and discussion on readings and critique. Shape shifting, misunderstood injuries, rapid aging, unidentified missing limbs, horrific imagery, gory details, gender politics, mystical healing, window to the unknown, heroes & villains, monsters & aliens, creatures from...hybrid forms, part man part animal, body extensions, cabinets of curiosities, are a only a few ways of approaching this topic as an artist. The primary objective for this course is to develop the skills needed to interpret and articulate contemporary modes for the creation of sculpture that students will encounter as professional artists and creative problem solvers.

    Prerequisites : FN 115 or any 100-level sculpture course

    3 credits
    SC 321

    Sculpture: Junior Major Studio 

    This course emphasizes the making of sculpture: inspiration, identifying material resources, developing technical skills, craftsmanship and critical awareness of visual and structural integrity. Four complete works and supporting material in the form of three-dimensional studies, experiments and drawings are expected. Students choose materials and subjective references, and works may incorporate resources and inspiration from other disciplines. Students develop productive work habits and learn to take charge of their direction and keep to a schedule. Technical assistance is available to help with new processes. Students work in all three studios of the department.

    Prerequisites : Two SC electives, preferably SC 105 & SC 106

    3 credits
    SC 351

    Introduction to the Discipline

    This course is a seminar that will provide the opportunity to establish a relationship and understanding to the history of sculpture. It will also provide the opportunity to locate your own practice within that history. Special emphasis is placed on seeing and understanding how contemporary sculpture has evolved to its current position. We will examine the shifts in material and the diversity of approaches to sculptural process. Through slide lectures, group conversations, reading, writing, research presentations, workshops, visiting artists lectures, field trips to museums, galleries, and artist studios, students will develop an understanding of the creative process and the ever expanding field of sculpture. Students will begin to identify the historical context of their own interests, and articulate their personal vision, both visually and verbally.

    Prerequisites : Major standing

    3 credits
    SC 421

    Sculpture: Senior Major Studio 

    This course equips students with the wherewithal to sustain artistic growth and emphasizes an independent and significant investigation of personal artistic interests and sensibilities. Students determine the nature of the work they produce, choosing technical means, materials, scale and context. Sculpture is approached as the perceptual and philosophical exploration of form and our interactions with it. Visual organization and craftsmanship, essential to making clear content, are stressed. Four complete works and supporting material in the form of three dimensional studies or experiments and drawings are expected, culminating in the presentation of a written thesis. Students work in all studios of the department.

    Prerequisites : SC 321-322

    3 credits
    SEM 353

    Junior Seminar: Fine Art Topics/Practice

    Fine Arts - Contemporary Topics and Practice is a studio/discussion course designed to provide historical ideas, context and ground for students to more clearly define their own studio work and relationship to art history. Group conversations, field trips, in-process critiques, workshops and/or visiting artists will assist students in establishing strategies for studio research in order to isolate, identify, and pursue a meaningful subject(s) within a personal and art historical context. Students will practice voicing their attitudes, opinions and conclusions about the topics discussed in seminar and gain more confidence talking about their own practice within larger issues of history, society, and culture outside of the art world. Scheduled concurrently with other sections of junior seminar, faculty and students will have the opportunity to meet as a larger group when appropriate.

    Prerequisites : Major standing

    3 credits
    SEM 451

    Professional Studio (Craft, Fine Arts, Digital Media, Illustration and Design)

    This one-semester course is designed to deliver professional development information to seniors through presentations and lectures pertinent to artists and designers. Topics from how to establish a studio/community to various ways of working with individuals and the public; to making a professional identity package and finances plus many more will be explored. In addition to lectures and tutorials, there may also be field trips connected to appropriate topics, as well as visiting artists and professionals such as a CPA and Maine Arts Commission. Class projects are designed to offer specific experiences and skills pertinent to the student’s professional development. Sections will be split to focus on area-specific professional information and assignments.

    Prerequisites : Must be majoring

    3 credits
    SEM 452

    Senior Synthesis

    This course is taken in the final semester of the senior year. It is an integral course with the studio practice. Students will be led through a guided research and writing process to identify and explore what their inspirations are for their studio work, how those interests are played out historically and what their relevance is to contemporary art and culture. The

    class will culminate in a fully articulated written thesis that explains and details their thesis work. Students will present their ideas at various points throughout the semester and conversations will be held about the ideas underlying their work both in the classroom and in individualized studio visits.

    Prerequisites : Major standing

    3 credits